Encyclopedia Astronautica
Bizan



bizanos.jpg
Bizan Orbiter
bizan.jpg
Bizan
Russian manned spaceplane. Study 1982. Bizan was the 1982 Soviet air-launched spaceplane design iteration between the '49' and 'MAKS' concepts. Like the '49', it was air-launched from atop an An-124 transport.

Unlike the '49', it was a single-stage-to-orbit tripropellant concept.

The rocket stage was equipped with Lox/Kerosene engines while the orbiter had reusable Lox/LH2 engines that drew propellant from the rocket stage. The advantage with the single stage was that the stage would land in the ocean across the world from the launch point. In the two-stage System 49, the first stage would crash into a drop zone 2000 km from the launching aircraft.

The rocket stage was equipped with a single NK-43A / 11D112A engine. The 15 metric ton orbiter had two RD-57M / 11D57M engines. The orbiter had a 1000 km cross range and a landing speed of 300 km/hr. One crewmember could stay aloft for mission durations of up to 24 hours. The orbiter was designed for 200 reuses and had a 6.0 m x 2.8 m payload bay. As in the '49' concept, orbits of from 120 to 1000 km altitude and 45 to 94 degrees inclination could be attained.

Characteristics

Crew Size: 1.

Gross mass: 200,000 kg (440,000 lb).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Russian Rocketplanes The story of rocketplanes and spaceplanes in the Soviet Union was one of constant setbacks due to internal politics, constant struggle with little result. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Bizan Russian air-launched orbital launch vehicle. Bizan was the 1982 Soviet air-launched spaceplane design iteration between the '49' and 'MAKS' concepts. Like the '49', it was air-launched from atop an An-124 transport. Unlike the '49', it was a single-stage-to-orbit tripropellant concept. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Molniya Russian manufacturer of rockets and spacecraft. Molniya Design Bureau, Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • Lozino-Lozinskiy, G E, editor, Aviationno-kosmicheskiye sistemy, MAI, Moscow, 1997.

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