Encyclopedia Astronautica
MSG



msg.jpg
MSG
European earth weather satellite. 2 launches, 2002.08.28 (MSG 1) and 2005.12.21 (MSG 2). MSG (Meteosat Second Generation 1) was a European (EUMETSAT consortium) geostationary weather satellite.

The 3.2m diameter cylindrical satellite had a dry mass of about 1000 kg and carried about 1010 kg of propellant. MSG was to allow quicker and more accurate weather forecasts in Europe than in the past. It carried two major instruments.

  • SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager) was a 12-channel imager that was to provide a set of surface and cloud-cover images every 15 minutes at a spatial resolution of 1 km. Four of the channels were in cloud- and soil-reflected visible wavelengths, four infrared channels were to measure temperature of clouds and sea-surface, and the remaining four infrared channels were to provide water vapor, ozone and carbon dioxide contents.

  • GERB (Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget) measured the radiation coming from the Sun and the reflected/emitted radiation from the Earth to obtain the radiation balance.

Raw data from both instruments was directly downlinked to Darmstadt, Germany. The processed data was to be uplinked to the same satellite to be rebroadcast to Europe and other regions.

The satellite also carried receivers for weather-data from remote/mobile sites, and a 406 MHz transponder for search-and-rescue SOS operations conducted by the global COSPAS-Surat organization.

First Launch: 2002.08.28.
Last Launch: 2005.12.21.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Ariane 5 The Ariane 5 was a completely new design, unrelated to the earlier Ariane 1 to 4. It consisted of a single-engine Lox/LH2 core stage flanked by two solid rocket boosters. Preparatory work began in 1984. Full scale development began in 1988 and cost $ 8 billion. The design was sized for the Hermes manned spaceplane, later cancelled. This resulted in the booster being a bit too large for the main commercial payload, geosynchronous communications satellites. As a result, development of an uprated version capable of launching two such satellites at a time was funded in 2000. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Ariane 5 French orbital launch vehicle. The Ariane 5 was a completely new design, unrelated to the earlier Ariane 1 to 4. It consisted of a single-engine Lox/LH2 core stage flanked by two solid rocket boosters. Preparatory work began in 1984. Full scale development began in 1988 and cost $ 8 billion. The design was sized for the Hermes manned spaceplane, later cancelled. This resulted in the booster being a bit too large for the main commercial payload, geosynchronous communications satellites. As a result, development of an uprated version capable of launching two such satellites at a time was funded in 2000. More...
  • Ariane 5G French orbital launch vehicle. Initial version of the Ariane 5, a bit too large for the main commercial geosynchronous communications satellite payloads. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Kourou After the agreement with newly independent Algeria for France to evacuate their launch sites in that country, a location near Biscarosse was selected for French missile testing. However since only launches westwards across the Bay of Biscay could be made from this site, it was unsuitable for France's Diamant orbital launch vehicle. After reviewing 14 potential sites, a location in the South American French colony of Guiana was selected. This would allow over-water launches to a tremendous range of possible orbital inclinations -- from -100.5 deg to 1.5 deg. Being near the equator, it would provide the maximum assist from the earth's rotation for launches into equatorial orbits. The decision was formalized in April 1964 and in July 1966 ELDO chose the site for future launches of the Europa II launch vehicle. More...

MSG Chronology


2002 August 28 - . 22:45 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA3. LV Family: Ariane 5. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5G. LV Configuration: Ariane 5G s/n V155.
  • MSG 1 - . Mass: 2,010 kg (4,430 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Alenia. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: MSG. USAF Sat Cat: 27509 . COSPAR: 2002-040B. Apogee: 35,790 km (22,230 mi). Perigee: 35,784 km (22,235 mi). Inclination: 1.8000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Launch delayed from August 27. MSG 1 (Meteosat Second Generation 1) was a European (EUMETSAT consortium) geostationary weather satellite. After first being parked over 10 E longitude for six months it was later to be moved to zero degree longitude. As of 2007 Mar 7 located at 3.50W drifting at 0.015W degrees per day.

2005 December 21 - . 22:33 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA3. LV Family: Ariane 5. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5GS. LV Configuration: Ariane 5GS V169.
  • MSG 2 - . Mass: 2,034 kg (4,484 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Eumetsat. Manufacturer: Alenia. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: MSG. USAF Sat Cat: 28912 . COSPAR: 2005-049B. Apogee: 35,793 km (22,240 mi). Perigee: 35,779 km (22,231 mi). Inclination: 1.5000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Delayed from mid-February, March 15, June 2005. Meteosat Second Generation spin-stabilized weather satellite. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 0.11W drifting at 0.024W degrees per day..

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