Encyclopedia Astronautica
STSat


South Korean technology satellite. First launch 2003.09.27.

The objective of the Science and Technology Satellite project was development and in-orbit test of an indigenously-developed Korean 100-kg class small satellite bus and demonstration of high performance 3-axis attitude control capability.

The program began in October 1998. Important objectives were the development of advanced technology for future space missions, obtaining experience in high performance scientific payload design, research in space science, and conducting communications technology experiments and oceanography research using land and sea based mobile terminals. The first STSat was launched in September 2003 aboard a Russian booster, and the second was to be lofted in 2007 by an indigenous KSLV-1 launch vehicle.

AKA: Science and Technology Satellite.
Gross mass: 100 kg (220 lb).
First Launch: 2003.09.27.
Last Launch: 2010.06.10.
Number: 3 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
  • Korea South South Korea became familiar with large-scale rocketry through maintenance and modification activities on American-supplied Honest John and Nike Hercules tactical missiles. By the 1990's Korea had developed an independent capability to manufacture solid propellant rocket motors of up to one tonne mass. In 1990 KARI was funded to build the first indigenous sounding rockets, flown as the KSR-I and KSR-II. In December 1997 KARI was allowed to proceed with development of liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket motor for an orbital launcher, but this was abandoned when the South Korean government decided it wanted to be among the top ten spacefaring nations by 2015. The existing program was too limited in growth potential to allow that. Therefore it was decided to leapfrog the technology by contracting with Russian companies. First launch of the KSLV-I launch vehicle from the new space centre took place in 2010. More...

See also
  • Kosmos 3 In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Kosmos 3 Russian orbital launch vehicle. In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...
  • Kosmos 11K65M Russian orbital launch vehicle. Definitive and prolific production version of satellite launcher based on Yangel R-14 IRBM. After further development at NPO Polyot (Omsk, Chief Designer A S Klinishkov), the modified Kosmos-3M added a restartable second stage with an orientation system. This booster was launched form two 'Cusovaya' launch complexes from 1967. The second stage used low thrust rockets using gas generator output to adjust the final velocity of the stage More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • KARI South Korean agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Korea South. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Plesetsk Plesetsk was the Soviet Union's northern cosmodrome, used for polar orbit launches of mainly military satellites, and was at one time the busiest launch centre in the world. The collapse of the Soviet Union put the main launch site of Baikonur in Kazakh territory. It now seems that once the Proton rocket is retired, Baikonur will be abandoned and Plesetsk will be Russia's primary launch centre. Upgrades to existing launch facilities will allow advanced versions of the Soyuz rocket and the new Angara launch vehicle to be launched from Plesetsk. Plesetsk's major drawback was the lower net payload in geosynchronous orbit from a northern latitude launch site. However Russia is planning to remove the disadvantage by looping geosynchronous satellites around the moon, using lunar gravity to make the necessary orbital plane change. More...

STSat Chronology


2003 September 27 - . 06:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC132/1. LV Family: Kosmos 3. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K65M. LV Configuration: Kosmos 11K65M 103.
  • STSat 1 (KaistSat 4, Uribyol 4) - . Mass: 100 kg (220 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KAIST. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: STSat. USAF Sat Cat: 27939 . COSPAR: 2003-042A. Apogee: 696 km (432 mi). Perigee: 676 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.50 min. Summary: Launch delayed from July 28, September 26. Payloads included the FUV Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS); Solid State Telescope (SST); Data Collection System (DCS); and Narrow Angle Star Sensor (NAST)..

2009 August 25 - . 08:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Goheung. LV Family: KSLV. Launch Vehicle: KSLV-I. LV Configuration: Naro KSLV-1. FAILURE: First and second stages operated correctly, but half of payload fairing failed to separate. Extra mass prevented the second stage and payload from reaching orbital velocity, and the satellite reentered over New Guinea..
2010 June 10 - . 18:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Goheung. LV Family: KSLV. Launch Vehicle: KSLV-I. LV Configuration: Naro-1. FAILURE: First stage failure..
  • STSAT-2B - . Mass: 99 kg (218 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Class: Technology. Type: Technology satellite. Spacecraft: STSAT. Summary: Science and Technology Satellite with Lyman-alpha imaging solar telescope and laser altimeter..

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