Encyclopedia Astronautica
Martin


American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956), Denver, CO, USA.

Martin established what would become the astronautics group in 1956 for development and production of the Titan I iCBM.

AKA: Glenn L Martin (1912-1961); Martin Marietta (1961-1995); Lockheed Martin (1995-); Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956).
Location: Denver, CO.

More... - Chronology...


Associated People
  • Timmons Timmons, Kenneth P (1919-1994) American engineer. Headed the Skylab Multiple Docking Adapter and External Tank projects. More...

Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Martin Project 7969 American manned spacecraft. Study 1958. Martin's proposal for the Air Force manned space project was a zero-lift vehicle launched by a Titan I with controlled flight in orbit. The spacecraft would be boosted into a 240 km orbit for a 24 hour mission. More...
  • Apollo W-1 American manned spacecraft. Study 1962. Martin's W-1 design for the Apollo spacecraft was an alternative to the preferred L-2C configuration. The 2652 kg command module was a blunt cone lifting body re-entry vehicle, 3.45 m in diameter, 3.61 m long. More...
  • Apollo L-2C American manned spacecraft. Study 1962. Martin's L-2C design was the basis for the Apollo spacecraft that ultimately emerged. The 2590 kg command module was a flat-bottomed cone, 3. 91 m in diameter, 2.67 m high, with a rounded apex. More...
  • Martin Astrorocket American manned spaceplane. Study 1962. Early two-stage-to-orbit shuttle study, using storable propellants, Dynasoar-configuration delta wing orbiter. More...
  • Apollo Experiments Pallet American manned lunar orbiter. Study 1965. The Apollo Experiments Pallet was a sophisticated instrument payload that would have been installed in the Apollo CSM for dedicated lunar or earth orbital resource assessment missions. More...
  • Prime American manned spaceplane. 3 launches, 1966.12.21 (Prime 1) to 1967.04.19 (Prime 3). The Prime (Precision Recovery Including Maneuvering Entry) project was the second part of the USAF START program. More...
  • X-24A American manned spaceplane. 28 launches, 1969.04.17 to 1971.06.04 . The X-24A was the Martin Corporation's subsonic test version of the US Air Force's preferred manned lifting body configuration. More...
  • EGRESS American manned rescue spacecraft. Study 1972. The EGRESS space escape system was based on the proven Encapsulated Ejection Seat System developed for the B-58 bomber in the 1960's. More...
  • X-24B American manned spaceplane. 36 launches, 1973.08.01 to 1975.11.26 . More...
  • X-24C American manned spaceplane. Cancelled 1977. Two X-24C NHFRF (National Hypersonic Flight Research Facility) aircraft were to be built under a $ 200 million budget. More...
  • Tiros N American earth weather satellite. 6 launches, 1978.10.13 (Tiros N) to 2002.06.24 (NOAA 17). Tiros N was part of the ongoing US series of polar-orbiting weather satellites. These were preceded by the TIROS series and the ITOS (Improved TIROS) series. More...
  • SCATHA American communications technology satellite. One launch, 1979.01.30. More...
  • OTV American space tug. Studied 1985-1989. The Orbital Transfer Vehicle was reusable space tug, powered by Lox/LH2 engines and equipped with an aerobrake allowing it to be returned for refueling and reuse at an orbiting space station. More...
  • Flight Telerobotic Servicer American logistics spacecraft. Study 1987. NASA decided to develop a $288-million Flight Telerobotic Servicer in 1987 after Congress voiced concern about American competitiveness in the field of robotics. More...
  • Lacrosse American military side-looking radar all-weather surveillance radar satellite. Operational, first launch 1988.12.02. More...
  • Magellan American Venus probe. One launch, 1989.05.04. The primary objectives of the Magellan mission were to map the surface of Venus with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and to determine the topographic relief of the planet. More...
  • Mars Direct American manned Mars expedition. Study 1991. In 1991 Martin Marietta and NASA Ames (Zubrin, Baker, and Gwynne) proposed 'Mars Direct' - a Mars expedition faster, cheaper, and better than the standard NASA plan. More...
  • HGV American spaceplane. Study 1992. The Hypersonic Glide Vehicle was a USAF project discussed openly in 1987 to 1988, which may have flown as a black project in 1992-1993. More...
  • Wind American earth magnetosphere satellite. One launch, 1994.11.01. Wind was designed to provide continuous measurement of the solar wind, particularly charged particles and magnetic field data. More...
  • Mars Global Surveyor American Mars orbiter. One launch, 1996.11.07. Mars Global Surveyor was a polar orbiting spacecraft designed to monitor Martian global weather and provide comprehensive maps of surface topography and the distribution of minerals. More...
  • STEX American tether technology satellite. One launch, 1998.10.03. STEX's (Space Technology EXperiments) main equipment was provided by the Naval Research Laboratory. More...
  • MCO American Mars orbiter. One launch, 1998.12.11, Mars Climate Orbiter. The Mars Climate Orbiter was to have accomplished mapping and weather studies of Mars and served as a relay for data from the Mars Polar Lander. More...
  • Mars Polar Lander American Mars lander. One launch, 1999.01.03. The Mars Polar Lander had the mission of studying Martian volatiles (frozen water and carbon dioxide) and climate history. The Martian polar regions were the best places to conduct these studies. More...
  • LMI Russian communications satellite. One launch, 1999.09.26. Lockheed Martin Intersputnik's LMI-1 satellite was a joint Russian-American venture. LMI-1 provided communications services to Eastern Europe and Central Asia. More...

Associated Engines
See also
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Martin HATV American orbital launch vehicle. The Martin HATV 1946 design used a single Aerojet engine of unconventional design to achieve single-stage-to-orbit performance. More...
  • Matador American intermediate range cruise missile. Glenn L. Martin Co. surface-to-surface cruise missile (Matador / Project MX-771). More...
  • Viking American sounding rocket. The Viking sounding rocket, originally code-named Neptune, was conceived in 1945 by the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as having the same altitude capability as the V-2 but only one third the mass. Martin was given the contract to develop the rocket, and Reaction Motors the engine. The advanced design featured a gimbaled pump-fed engine, a fuel tank integral with the fuselage. All rockets would be static-tested and certified before launch. The first launch was on 3 May 1949. Viking was abandoned in 1954 as too expensive, but Martin's experience on the design led to the first stage of the Vanguard orbital launch vehicle and the Titan ICBM. More...
  • Titan-Vanguard American orbital launch vehicle. The Martin Company proposed to the Department of Defense that the first stage of the Titan I intercontinental ballistic missile be combined with the Vanguard rocket to provide a launch vehicle capable of placing an instrument package into lunar orbit and on the lunar surface. NASA was instead given the mission and used Atlas/Agena and Atlas/Centaur for this purpose instead. More...
  • Bold Orion 1 American anti-ballistic missile. Two stage vehicle consisting of 1 x B-47 Stratojet + 1 x Sergeant More...
  • Bold Orion American air-launched anti-ballistic missile. Dropped from B-47 medium bombers, the missile consisted of a Sergeant booster and Altair upper stage. More...
  • Bold Orion 2 American anti-ballistic missile. Three stage vehicle consisting of 1 x B-47 Stratojet + 1 x Sergeant + 1 x Altair More...
  • Titan American orbital launch vehicle. The Titan launch vehicle family was developed by the United States Air Force to meet its medium lift requirements in the 1960's. The designs finally put into production were derived from the Titan II ICBM. Titan outlived the competing NASA Saturn I launch vehicle and the Space Shuttle for military launches. It was finally replaced by the USAF's EELV boosters, the Atlas V and Delta IV. Although conceived as a low-cost, quick-reaction system, Titan was not successful as a commercial launch vehicle. Air Force requirements growth over the years drove its costs up - the Ariane using similar technology provided lower-cost access to space. More...
  • Titan 1 American intercontinental ballistic missile. ICBM, built as back-up to Atlas, using two stages instead of one and a half, and conventional tank construction in lieu of balloon tanks. It was also to have been used for suborbital tests of the X-20A Dynasoar manned space plane. For unknown reasons never refurbished for use as space launcher and scrapped after being replaced by the Titan II in the missile role in mid-1960's. More...
  • Mace American intermediate range cruise missile. Intermediate range cruise missile. Only Cape Canaveral launches are listed here, but over 30 launches were also conducted from Launch Area Able-51 by Det 1, 4504th CCTW at Holloman AFB, New Mexico from October 1959 throurgh 1963. More...
  • Titan 3BAS2 American orbital launch vehicle. Configuration of Titan 3B proposed by Martin in mid-1960's. Titan 3B for deep space missions with Centaur upper stage, Algol strapons for liftoff thrust augmentation. Never flown. More...
  • Winged Titan American winged orbital launch vehicle. The only trace of this winged version of the Titan launch vehicle are some drawings in popular magazines ca. 1960. More...
  • Astroplane American winged orbital launch vehicle. Martin concept of 1961 for a horizontal takeoff / horizontal landing, single-stage-to-orbit vehicle that would be powered by nuclear magnetohydrodynamic engines. More...
  • Soltan American orbital launch vehicle. The progenitor of the Titan 3 was this design, which used two, 3 segment, 100 inch diameter solid rocket boosters. The 100 inch segmented boosters had already been ground-fired by Aerojet. However the final decision was to develop the more-capable Titan 3C with 5 segment, 120 inch diameter solid rocket boosters. More...
  • Titan C American orbital launch vehicle. The Titan C, a Titan II booster stage topped by a new liquid oxygen/hydrogen upper stage, was the launch vehicle selected in November 1959 for the DynaSoar orbital flight program. Despite the fact the upper stage engine was secretly tested in 1958-1960, after many political twists and turns, it was cancelled in favor of the Titan 3C in July 1961 More...
  • Titan 2 American intercontinental ballistic missile. ICBM, developed also as the launch vehicle for the manned Gemini spacecraft in the early 1960's. When the ICBM's were retired in the 1980's they were refurbished and a new series of launches began. More...
  • Midgetman American intercontinental ballistic missile. Early 1960's two-stage version of Minuteman. More...
  • Martin Astrorocket American winged orbital launch vehicle. Early two-stage-to-orbit shuttle study, using storable propellants, Dynasoar-configuration delta wing orbiter and booster. More...
  • Nova MM T10RE-1 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Two stage Nova using CD modules; reusable first stage with 18 modules exhausting to a 10% length plug nozzle; expendable second stage with 2 CD module engines. Operational date would have been January 1977. More...
  • Nova MM T10EE-1 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Two stage Nova using CD modules; expendable first stage with 18 modules exhausting to a 10% length plug nozzle; expendable second stage with 2 CD module engines. Operational date would have been November 1976. More...
  • Nova MM S10R-1 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Reusable single stage to orbit Nova using cylindrical shape, 24 CD module engines in zero-length plug nozzle. Operational date would have been June 1978. More...
  • Nova MM S10E-1 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Expendable single stage to orbit Nova using cylindrical shape, 24 CD module engines in zero-length plug nozzle. Operational date would have been October 1977. More...
  • Nova MM R10R-2 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Reusable version of most exotic Martin Nova vairant; single stage to orbit, 30 cd module air augmented engines in annular shroud. Operational date would have been October 1980. More...
  • Nova MM R10E-2 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Expendable version of most exotic Martin Nova vairant; single stage to orbit, 30 cd module air augmented engines in annular shroud. Operational date would have been October 1980. More...
  • Nova MM S10E-2 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Expendable single stage to orbit Nova using conical shape, 30 CD module engines in zero-length plug nozzle. Operational date would have been November 1977. More...
  • Nova MM S10R-2 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Reusable single stage to orbit Nova using conical shape, 30 CD module engines in zero-length plug nozzle. Operational date would have been July 1978. More...
  • Nova MM T10RR-2 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Two stage Nova using CD modules; reusable first stage with 24 modules exhausting to a zero length plug nozzle; reusable second stage with a toroidal plug nozzle engine. Operational date would have been December 1976. More...
  • Nova MM 33 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova single stage to orbit design with 24 new high pressure LH2/Lox engines in the first stage in a plug nozzle arrangement. Operational date would have been April 1975. More...
  • Nova MM T10RR-3 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Two stage Nova using CD modules; reusable first stage with 18 modules exhausting to a 10% length plug nozzle; reusable second stage with 2 CD module engines. Operational date would have been July 1977. More...
  • Nova MM 34 American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova 1 1/2 stage design with 4 new 3 million kgf LH2/Lox engines in the jettisonable booster section and a single 3 million kgf sustainer. Operational date would have been June 1976. More...
  • Nova MM 14A American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova design using 4 300 inch solids as first stage, 5 M-1 in second stage. Operational date would have been April 1973 More...
  • Nova MM 1B American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova design using existing engines; 14 F-1A in the first stage, 2 M-1 in the second. Operational date would have been December 1972 More...
  • Nova MM 14B American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova design using 4 280 inch solids as first stage, 4 M-1 in second stage. Operational date would have been February 1973 More...
  • Nova MM 1C American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova design using existing engines; 18 F-1A in the first stage, 3 M-1 in the second. Operational date would have been February 1973 More...
  • Nova GD-F American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. General Dynamics Nova design using new 3.5 million kgf Lox/Kerosene engines in first stage. Recoverable stage; separation at 3,365 m/s at 89,300 m altitude; splashdown using retrorockets under 8 46 m diameter parachutes 1300 km downrange. Massed estimated based on tank volumes, total thrust, and first stage burnout conditions. More...
  • Nova MM 24G American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. Nova design using new high pressure LH2/Lox engines; 18 in the first stage in a plug nozzle arrangement, 2 in the second. Operational date would have been December 1974. More...
  • Titan II GLV American intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Version for launch of Gemini manned spacecraft. Developed in parallel with ICBM version. Differed in having redundancy features in systems and MDS (Malfunction Detection System) installed. More...
  • Titan 3A American orbital launch vehicle. Titan with Transtage third stage. Core for Titan 3C. More...
  • Lacrosse American tactical ballistic missile. Nuclear-armed short-range ballistic missile briefly deployed by the U.S. Army in the late 1950s. Its rocket motor was the basis for the Doorknob sounding rocket. More...
  • Sprint Nuclear-armed point defense anti-ballistic missile, an incredible high-acceleration weapon that would intercept incoming Soviet ICBMs in the atmosphere within 15 seconds of launch. Deployment limited by arms agreements and only 70 were briefly in service in 1975-1976. More...
  • Titan 3C American orbital launch vehicle. Titan 3A with five segment solid motors. Man-rated design originally developed for Dynasoar spaceplane. More...
  • Titan 3M American orbital launch vehicle. Man-rated launch vehicle designed for MOL and other missions of the 1970's. Malfunction Detection System initiated abort procedures during launch. Also suited for launch of 'bulbous and lifting body payloads'. 7 segment UA1207 motors developed but not used until Titan 4 in 1990's. Cancelled with MOL program in 1969. More...
  • Titan 3L2 American orbital launch vehicle. Variant of Titan with 15 foot Large Diameter Core, 2 x 7 segment strap-ons. Man-rated, optimized for delivery of heavy payloads into LEO. Never developed. More...
  • Titan 3L4 American orbital launch vehicle. Variant of Titan with 15 foot Large Diameter Core, 4 x 7 segment strap-ons. Man rated, optimized for delivery of 40,000 pound manned payloads into 250 nm / 50 deg space station orbit. More...
  • Titan 3C7 American orbital launch vehicle. Variant of Titan 3C with seven segment solid motors. Proposed by Martin for precise delivery of payloads beyond Titan 3C capacity into geosynch orbit. Never flown. More...
  • Titan 3B American orbital launch vehicle. Titan core with Agena upper stage. Found to be more cost effective and higher performance than using Transtage. More...
  • Spacemaster American winged orbital launch vehicle. Martin-Marrietta shuttle Phase A design. X-24B type lifting body orbiter with unique catamaran-configuration booster. More...
  • Shuttle HCR American winged orbital launch vehicle. McDonnell-Douglas/Martin Marrietta shuttle high cross-range proposal phase B of December 1970. Swept wing booster, delta wing orbiter. More...
  • Shuttle LCR American winged orbital launch vehicle. McDonnell-Douglas/Martin Marrietta shuttle low cross-range proposal phase B of December 1970. Swept-wing booster, Faget straight wing orbiter. More...
  • Titan 23B American orbital launch vehicle. Basic Titan 3A core, originally developed for Titan 3C, with Agena D upper stage replacing Transtage. New radio guidance system, 1.5 m diameter fairing atop Agena. Payload remained attached to the Agena. More...
  • Titan 33B American orbital launch vehicle. Basic Titan 3A core, except guidance provided by the Agena upper stage. The Agena and its payload were completely enclosed in a new 3.05 m diameter shroud. 'Ascent Agena' seperated after orbital insertion and did not remain attached to the payload. More...
  • Titan 3D American orbital launch vehicle. Titan 3C without transtage. More...
  • Titan 24B American orbital launch vehicle. Stretched first stage, originally developed for the cancelled MOL program, with Agena D upper stage. Radio guidance system, 1.5 m diameter fairing atop Agena. Payload remained attached to the Agena. More...
  • Titan 23C American orbital launch vehicle. Post-MOL standardisation of Titan 3C, with man-rated systems removed, upgraded first stage engines, digital avionics, blowdown solid rocket motor thrust vector control in place of pressure-regulated system, simplified Transtage attitude control system. More...
  • Titan 3E American orbital launch vehicle. Titan 3D with Centaur D-1T upper stage. Used by NASA for deep space missions in 1970's. More...
  • Titan 34B American orbital launch vehicle. Stretched Titan core, originally developed for Titan 3M MOL, with Agena D upper stage. Guidance provided by the Agena upper stage. The Agena and its payload were completely enclosed in a 3.05 m diameter shroud. 'Ascent Agena' seperated after orbital insertion and did not remain attached to the payload. More...
  • Titan 2B American intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Space launch version of Titan 2 ICBM, obtained through minimal modification of ICBM (new wiring and avionics only, and use of existing ICBM re-entry vehicle shroud). Proposed in the late 1980's but never developed. More...
  • Titan 2L American intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Version of refurbished Titan 2 ICBM with two liquid propellant strap-on stages. Proposed in the late 1980's but never developed. More...
  • Titan 2S American intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Version of refurbished Titan 2 ICBM with two to eight Castor 4A solid-propellant strap-on stages. Proposed in the late 1980's but never developed. More...
  • Peacekeeper American intercontinental ballistic missile. 10 nuclear MIRV warheads. In service 1986-2004. More...
  • Titan 34D American orbital launch vehicle. Stretched Titan core designed for use with 5 1/2 segment solid rocket motors. IUS (Interim/Inertial Upper Stage) solid upper stages, Transtage, or used without upper stages. More...
  • Martin Marietta SDV American orbital launch vehicle. The Martin Marietta Class I SDV would lead to the Shuttle-C, using the shuttle aft fuselage with SSME engines to power a cargo canister into orbit. More...
  • Titan 4 American orbital launch vehicle. Developed to handle military payloads designed for launch on Shuttle from Vandenberg before the USAF pulled out of the Shuttle program after the Challenger disaster. Further stretch of core from Titan 34, 7-segment solid rocket motors (developed for MOL but not used until 25 years later). Enlarged Centaur G used as upper stage (variant of stage designed for Shuttle but prohibited for flight safety reasons after Challenger). Completely revised electronics. All the changes resulted in major increase in cost of launch vehicle and launch operations. More...
  • Barbarian MM American heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. The Zenith Star space-based chemical laser missile defence weapon required a launch vehicle capable of placing a 45,000 kg payload into low earth orbit. Martin and Aerojet turned to their work 20 years earlier on advanced Titans for the MOL program. These earlier studies were combined with new concepts for tank construction and materials. The Martin Barbarian was a 4.57 m diameter Titan vehicle (instead of the customary 3.05 m) with four LR-87 engines on the first stage, and a single LR-87 engine on the second stage. More...
  • Titan 2G American intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Space launch version, obtained through minimal refurbishment of decommissioned ICBM's. More...
  • Titan 5 American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed Titan upgrade with cryogenic core as replacement for NLS. More...
  • SICBM American mobile small intercontinental ballistic missile. Developed 1986-1991, but cancelled as unnecessary at the end of the Cold War. More...
  • Commercial Titan 3 American orbital launch vehicle. Commercial version of Titan 34D military booster. It differed in having a lengthened second stage and a 4 m diameter payload shroud to handle shuttle-class or Ariane-type dual payloads. More...
  • Titan 405A American orbital launch vehicle. Version of Titan 4 with no upper stage, configured for launch of lower-mass, higher-orbit SDS and NOSS-2 payloads from Cape Canaveral. More...
  • Shuttle C Block II American orbital launch vehicle. In August 1989 NASA studied a version of the Shuttle-C with two Advanced Solid Rocket Mortors (ASRM's) in place of the standard RSRM's. This would increase the payload by 4500 kg, but also require use of a new 10 m x 30 m payload module. More...
  • Titan 4B American orbital launch vehicle. Titan 4 with Upgraded Solid Rocket Motors replacing UA1207. Developed to improve performance for certain missions, and reduce number of field joints in motor after Challenger and Titan 34D explosions involving segmented motors. More...
  • Titan 403A American orbital launch vehicle. Version of Titan 4 with no upper stage, configured for launch of lower-mass, higher-orbit Lacrosse, SDS and NOSS-2 payloads from Vandenberg. More...
  • ATACMS II American short range ballistic missile. ATACMS Block II is a derivative of the MGM-140 ATACMS (Army Tactical Missile System). The Block II designation applies to ATACMS variants designed to deliver the BAT (Brilliant Anti-Tank) guided submunition. More...
  • MGM-31D American intermediate range ballistic missile. Cancelled. Pershing II RR Reduced Range More...
  • Titan 404A American orbital launch vehicle. Version of Titan 4 with no upper stage, configured for launch of heavy-weight, low altitude KH-12 and Improved CRYSTAL payloads from Vandenberg. More...
  • Titan 404B American orbital launch vehicle. Version of Titan 4B with no upper stage, configured for launch from Vandenberg. More...
  • Atlas IIIA American orbital launch vehicle. The Atlas IIIA was a development of the Atlas using Russian engines in place of the Rocketdyne MA-5 booster/sustainer group used on all previous models. It was the centerpiece of Lockheed Martin's strategy to remain a leader in the commercial launch services industry. However customers never materialized, and it was used for only two launches in 2002-2004 before being replaced by the Atlas V. More...
  • Atlas V American orbital launch vehicle. The Atlas V launch vehicle system was a completely new design that succeeded the earlier Atlas series. Atlas V vehicles were based on the 3.8-m (12.5-ft) diameter Common Core Booster (CCB) powered by a single Russian RD-180 engine. These could be clustered together, and complemented by a Centaur upper stage, and up to five solid rocket boosters, to achieve a wide range of performance. More...
  • Titan 403B American orbital launch vehicle. Version of Titan 4B with no upper stage, configured for launch from Vandenberg. More...
  • Atlas V 401 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V version with a 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and no strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 7,095 kg (15,642 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 4,950 kg (10,910 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas IIIB American orbital launch vehicle. This was the first version of the Atlas to fly using Russian RD-180 engines; and the last version to fly using the original balloon-tank concept for the first stage. It differed from the Atlas IIIA in use of a stretched, two-engine upper stage, and had a brief three-year operational career in 2002-2005 before being superseded by the Atlas V. More...
  • Atlas V 521 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V with 5-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and two strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 10,161 kg (22,401 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 6,485 kg (14,297 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V 501 Atlas V with 5-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and no strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 6,319 kg (13,931 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 3,970 kg (8,752 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V 431 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V with 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and three strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 11,547 kg (25,458 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 7,800 kg (17,196 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V 551 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V with 5-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and five strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 20,520 kg (45,238 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 8,700 kg (19,180 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V 411 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V with 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and one strap-on solid booster. Payloads: 8,763 kg (19,320 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 6,075 kg (13,393 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V 421 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V with 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and two strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 10,168 kg (22,416 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Atlas V Growth Phase 1 American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed growth variant of the heavy-lift version of the Atlas V launch vehicle with three parallel 3.8-m-diameter Common Core Boosters (CCB), a 5-m-diameter wide body version of the Centaur upper stage with a single-engine, and a 5 m diameter payload fairing. Another variant would use a stretched wide body version of the Centaur upper stage with 2 or 4 motors, allowing payloads of up to 13,500 kg to be lofted to earth escape velocity. More...
  • Atlas V Growth Phase 2 American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed growth variant of the heavy-lift version of the Atlas V launch vehicle with three parallel 5-m-diameter wide-body Common Core Boosters (CCB), each with 1 or 2 RD-180 engines; a 5-m-diameter new Lox/LH2 stage with 2 or 4 engines with a total thrust of 180,000 kgf; and a 5 m diameter payload fairing. More...
  • Atlas V Growth Phase 3 American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed Saturn-V class variant of the heavy-lift version of the Atlas V launch vehicle with five parallel 5-m-diameter wide-body Common Core Boosters (CCB), each with 1 or 2 RD-180 engines; a 7-m-diameter new Lox/LH2 stage; and a 7 m diameter payload fairing. More...
  • Atlas V Heavy American orbital launch vehicle. Heavy-lift version of the Atlas V launch vehicle system with three parallel 3.8-m-diameter Common Core Boosters (CCB), and a stretched version of the Centaur upper stage (CIII), which could be configured as a single-engine Centaur (SEC) or a dual engine Centaur (DEC), and a 5 m diameter payload fairing. As of 2004 no work had been authorised to build Atlas V Heavy facilities at either Cape Canaveral or Vandenberg AFB. More...

Associated Programs
  • Discovery The Discovery program was begun by NASA in the early 1990s as the planetary counterpart to the Explorer program. More...
  • Mars Surveyor A series of lower-cost missions devoted to the mapping of Mars from Mars orbit. Designed to accomplish at less cost the mission assigned to the failed Mars Observer. More...

Associated Stages
  • Viking-1 Lox/Alcohol rocket stage. 93.00 kN (20,907 lbf) thrust. Mass 4,500 kg (9,921 lb). More...

Martin Chronology


1988 December 2 - . 14:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39B. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Shuttle. LV Configuration: Space Shuttle STS-27R.
  • USA 34 - . Payload: Lacrosse 1. Nation: USA. Agency: NRO; CIA. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Lacrosse. Decay Date: 1997-03-25 . USAF Sat Cat: 19671 . COSPAR: 1988-106B. Apogee: 447 km (277 mi). Perigee: 437 km (271 mi). Inclination: 57.0000 deg. Period: 93.40 min. Summary: Deployed from STS-27. Operations completed March 1997..

1991 March 8 - . 12:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC4E. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 403A. LV Configuration: Titan 403A K-5 (45F-1).
  • USA 69 - . Payload: Lacrosse 2. Nation: USA. Agency: NRO; CIA. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Lacrosse. USAF Sat Cat: 21147 . COSPAR: 1991-017A. Apogee: 662 km (411 mi). Perigee: 420 km (260 mi). Inclination: 68.0000 deg. Period: 95.50 min. Summary: Still operating December 1997. First West Coast launch of a Titan 4..

1997 October 24 - . 02:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC4E. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 403A. LV Configuration: Titan 403A 4A-18 (K-18, 45F-3).
  • USA 133 - . Payload: Lacrosse 3. Nation: USA. Agency: NRO; CIA. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Lacrosse. USAF Sat Cat: 25017 . COSPAR: 1997-064A. Apogee: 679 km (421 mi). Perigee: 666 km (413 mi). Inclination: 57.0000 deg. Summary: Still operating December 1997..

1998 January 10 - . 00:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5. LV Configuration: Delta 7925-9.5 D252.
  • Skynet 4D - . Nation: UK. Agency: MoD. Manufacturer: Martin. Program: Skynet. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: ECS/OTS. USAF Sat Cat: 25134 . COSPAR: 1998-002A. Apogee: 35,795 km (22,241 mi). Perigee: 35,776 km (22,230 mi). Inclination: 3.9000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Geostationary at 52.8 degrees E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 53 deg E in 1998-1999; moving As of 4 September 2001 located at 34.00 deg W drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 34.33W drifting at 0.016W degrees per day..

1998 December 11 - . 18:45 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7425-9.5. LV Configuration: Delta 7425-9.5 D264.
  • Mars Climate Orbiter - . Mass: 629 kg (1,386 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: JPL. Manufacturer: Martin. Program: Mars Surveyor. Class: Mars. Type: Mars probe. Spacecraft: MCO. Decay Date: 1999-09-23 . USAF Sat Cat: 25571 . COSPAR: 1998-073A. The Mars Climate Orbiter was the second flight of the Mars Surveyor Program. The probe was to enter a 160 km x 38600 km polar orbit around Mars on September 23,1999, and use aerobraking to reach a 373 km x 437 km x 92.9 degree sun-synchronous mapping orbit by November 23 1999. While the Mars Orbit Insertion burn began as planned on September 23, 1999 at 08:50 GMT, no signal was received after the spacecraft went behind the planet. Subsequent investigation showed that the spacecraft had plunged deep into the Martian atmosphere, with its closest approach to Mars being 57 km. It was concluded that the spacecraft burnt up in the atmosphere. It was later found that cutbacks in tracking, combined with incorrect values in a look-up table imbedded deep in the spacecraft software (use of pounds force instead of newtons) were to blame. This failure led to a shake-up of NASA's 'faster, better, cheaper' approach to unmanned spaceflight. Additional Details: here....

1999 January 3 - . 20:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7425-9.5. LV Configuration: Delta 7425-9.5 D265.
  • Mars Polar Lander - . Mass: 576 kg (1,269 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: JPL. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Mars. Type: Mars probe. Spacecraft: Mars Polar Lander. Decay Date: 1999-12-03 . USAF Sat Cat: 25605 . COSPAR: 1999-001A. The Mars Polar Lander was placed by the first burn of the second stage into a 157 x 245 km x 28.35 deg parking orbit. The second stage restarted at 20:55 GMT and shut down in a 226 x 740 km x 25.8 deg Earth orbit. The solid rocket third stage (a Star 48B with a Nutation Control System and a yo-yo despin device) then ignited and put the spacecraft into solar orbit, separating at 21:02 GMT. Mars Polar Lander was to land near the south pole of Mars on December 3, 1999, and conduct conduct a three month mission, trenching near its landing site and testing for the presense of frozen water and carbon dioxide. Attached were two Deep Space 2 Microprobes, penetrators which would impact the Martian surface separately from the lander and return data on subsurface conditions from widely spaced points.

    When the spacecraft reached Mars on December 3, the lander separated from the cruise stage at 19:51 UTC and the two penetrators, Scott and Amundsen, were to separate about 20 seconds later. No further communications were ever received from the spacecraft. Landing had been expected at 20:01 UTC at 76.1S 195.3W, with the penetrators landing a few kilometres from each other at 75.0S 196.5W.

    This failure resulted in a review and reassessment of NASA's 'faster, better, cheaper' approach to planetary missions.


1999 February 7 - . 21:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7426-9.5. LV Configuration: Delta 7426-9.5 D266.
  • Stardust - . Payload: Discovery 4. Mass: 370 kg (810 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: JPL. Manufacturer: Martin. Program: Discovery. Class: Comet. Type: Comet probe. Spacecraft: Stardust. USAF Sat Cat: 25618 . COSPAR: 1999-003A. Stardust was to fly within 100 km of comet 81P/Wild-2 in January 2004 and recover cometary material using an aerogel substance. A return capsule would land on a lake bed in Utah in January 2006, returning the material to earth. The launch went as planned. The second stage ignited at 21:08 GMT and its first burn put the vehicle into a 185 km x 185 km x 28 degree parking orbit at 21:14 GMT. The second stage second burn at 21:25 changed the orbit to planned values of 178 km x 7184 km x 28.5 degrees. The Star 37FM solid third stage ignited at 21:29 GMT and placed the spacecraft into a 2 year period solar orbit. The spacecraft separated at 21:31 GMT. Meanwhile, the Delta 266 second stage burned a third time on its own, until its propellants were depleted, entering a final orbit of 294 km x 6818 km x 22.5 degrees. The Stardust probe flew past Earth at a distance of 3706 km at 1115 GMT on January 15, 2001, and flew near the Moon at a distance of 98000 km at around 0200 GMT on January 16. The gravity assist flyby changed Stardust's heliocentric orbit from 0.956 x 2.216 AU x 0.0 deg to 0.983 x 2.285 AU x 3.7 deg.

1999 April 27 - . 18:22 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC6. LV Family: Athena. Launch Vehicle: Athena-2. LV Configuration: Athena-2 LM-005. FAILURE: Payload shroud failed to separate four minutes after launch.. Failed Stage: S.
  • Ikonos 1 - . Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Ikonos. COSPAR: F990427A. Tracking stations downrange did not pick up the spacecraft. It was later determined that the rocket nose fairing failed to separate four minutes after launch. The extra mass caused the vehicle to reenter over the South Pacific on the first partial orbit. Space Imaging's Ikonos 1 was to have been the first commercial imaging satellite with a high a resolution camera.

2000 August 17 - . 23:45 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC4E. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 403B. LV Configuration: Titan 403B 4B-28 / K-25.
  • USA 152 - . Payload: Onyx F1. Mass: 14,500 kg (31,900 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Lacrosse. USAF Sat Cat: 26473 . COSPAR: 2000-047A. Apogee: 695 km (432 mi). Perigee: 689 km (428 mi). Inclination: 67.9970 deg. Period: 98.53 min. The National Reconnaissance Office satellite was reported to be an Onyx (formerly Lacrosse) radar imaging spacecraft built by Lockheed Martin. The Titan second stage reached a 572 x 675 km x 68.0 deg orbit and separated from the payload. Amateur observers reported the payload has made two small maneuvers and by Aug 23 was in a 681 x 695 km x 68.1 deg orbit.

2001 August 8 - . 16:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7326-9.5. LV Configuration: Delta 7326-9.5 D287.
  • Genesis - . Payload: Discovery 5. Mass: 636 kg (1,402 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA; JPL. Manufacturer: Martin. Program: Discovery. Class: Astronomy. Type: Solar astronomy satellite. Spacecraft: Genesis. USAF Sat Cat: 26884 . COSPAR: 2001-034A. Apogee: 1,175,513 km (730,428 mi). Perigee: 213,681 km (132,774 mi). Inclination: 28.0000 deg. Period: 97,345.15 min. Launch delayed from February 10 and July 30. The Genesis probe flew to the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrangian point and spend two years collecting samples of the solar wind. The collected samples were to be physically returned to Earth in a sample return capsule (air-snatch recovery was planned over Utah) and analysed in ground-based laboratories. The first burn of the Delta second stage put Genesis in a 185 x 197 km x 28.5 deg parking orbit at 1624 GMT. At 1712 GMT a second burn raised the orbit to 182 x 3811 km, and at 1713 GMT the third stage fired to put Genesis on its trajectory to L1 with a nominal apogee of around 1.2 million km. By the first week of November 2001 Genesis arrived at the Earth-Sun L1 point. A malfunctioning thermal radiator caused some concern for the health of the sample return capsule's critical battery, which was overheating, but Genesis began collecting solar wind samples on schedule.

    On September 8, 2004, the Genesis space probe became the first spacecraft to return from beyond lunar orbit to the Earth's surface. The Genesis Sample Return Capsule separated from the spacecraft on September 8, 66,000 km above the Earth. The capsule successfully re-entered the atmosphere over Oregon at 11 km/s, but a wiring error resulted in the drogue parachute release mortar failing to fire at 33 km altitude. The capsule crashed to earth at 90 m/s in the Dugway Proving Ground at 40 07 40 N 113 30 29 W. Although the vehicle was smashed, some of the samples could be retrieved.


2001 September 8 - . 15:25 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas IIAS. LV Configuration: Atlas IIAS AC-160 MLV-10.
  • USA 160 - . Payload: MLV-10. Mass: 5,000 kg (11,000 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Military. Type: Military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. Spacecraft: NOSS-3. USAF Sat Cat: 26905 . COSPAR: 2001-040A. Launch delayed from July 31. First of a new series of naval electronic intelligence satellites for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). The Lockheed Martin Atlas IIAS AC-160 put the vehicle in a transfer orbit. The phrasing of the launch commentary implied that the second burn left the payload in 'transfer orbit', but several observers saw the bright Centaur in the typical final deployment orbit of the earlier NOSS satellites. Therefore it seemed the first burn was to a transfer orbit of around 180 x 1100 km x 63 deg. The second burn at 1629 GMT put the Centaur and payload into an 1100 x 1100 km x 63 deg orbit. The design was apparently quite different from earlier generation NOSS satellites since only one companion satellite was deployed rather than two. Prime contractor for the new satellites was again believed to be Lockheed Martin Astronautics at Denver. The NRL probably continued to have a management and technical role in the program under overall NRO auspices.
  • USA 160 companion - . Payload: MLV-10. Mass: 5,000 kg (11,000 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Manufacturer: Martin. Class: Military. Type: Military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. Spacecraft: NOSS-3. USAF Sat Cat: 26907 . COSPAR: 2001-040C.

2007 March 9 - . 03:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V 401 AV-013.
  • Falconsat-3 - . Mass: 50 kg (110 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Manufacturer: USAF Colorado Springs. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: Falconsat. USAF Sat Cat: 30776 . COSPAR: 2007-006E. Apogee: 559 km (347 mi). Perigee: 558 km (346 mi). Inclination: 35.4000 deg. Period: 95.80 min. Summary: USAF Academy student satellite with ionospheric experiments and plasma atttiude control thrusters..

2007 September 18 - . 18:35 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-XC. LV Configuration: Delta 7920-10C D326.
  • WorldView 1 - . Mass: 2,500 kg (5,500 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: WorldView. USAF Sat Cat: 32060 . COSPAR: 2007-041A. Apogee: 496 km (308 mi). Perigee: 492 km (305 mi). Inclination: 97.5000 deg. Period: 94.50 min. Summary: Spacecraft was equipped with a 0.6-m aperture telescope for high resolution surveillance. Civilian, but primary customer was to be the US National Geospatial Intelligence Agency..

2007 September 27 - . 11:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925H. LV Configuration: Delta 7925H D327.
  • Dawn - . Mass: 1,218 kg (2,685 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Dawn. USAF Sat Cat: 32249 . COSPAR: 2007-043A. Asteroid belt unmanned probe designed to first orbit and survey the asteroid Vesta, and then fly on to the largest asteroid, Ceres. The Delta upper stage boosted the spacecraft and PAM-D solid third stage to 9.01 km/sec and a 185 km x 6835 km orbit. The PAM-D fired at 12:29 GMT and released Dawn after accelerating it to 11.50 km/sec and sending it into a 1.00 AU x 1.62 AU x 0.5 deg solar orbit. The ion engines were ignited on 6 October. Using its ion engines and a Mars flyby in February 2009, Dawn was scheduled to reach Vesta in 2011 and Ceres in 2015.

2007 October 11 - . 00:22 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 421. LV Configuration: Atlas V 421 AV-011.
  • USA 195 - . Payload: WGS SV-1. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 702. USAF Sat Cat: 32258 . COSPAR: 2007-046A. Apogee: 39,016 km (24,243 mi). Perigee: 32,586 km (20,247 mi). Inclination: 0.2000 deg. Period: 1,436.80 min. Summary: First USAF Wideband Global Satcom satellite, designed to replace the DSCS series, was placed by the Atlas booster in an initial 477 km x 66,847 km x 20.1 deg geosynchronous transfer orbit. The satellite carried X-band and Ka-band communications payloads..

2007 December 10 - . 22:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V 401 AV-015.
  • USA 198 - . Payload: NROL-24. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: SDS-3. USAF Sat Cat: 32378 . COSPAR: 2007-060A. Apogee: 39,705 km (24,671 mi). Perigee: 515 km (320 mi). Inclination: 62.6000 deg. Classified National Reconnaisance Office payload; probable primary payload data relay communications. May also have carried SBIRS HEO-2 infrared missile warning sensor and a TWINS-B magnetospheric research experiment. Initial orbit 261 x 16776 km x 60.0 deg.

2007 December 20 - . 20:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925. LV Configuration: Delta 7925-9.5 D331.
  • USA 199 - . Payload: GPS 2R-5M / Navstar 61. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Manufacturer: Lockheed. Program: Navstar. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2R. USAF Sat Cat: 32384 . COSPAR: 2007-062A. Apogee: 20,283 km (12,603 mi). Perigee: 20,082 km (12,478 mi). Inclination: 55.0000 deg. Period: 718.00 min. Summary: Fifth GPS SV with L2C capability..

2008 March 13 - . 10:02 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 411. LV Configuration: Atlas V 411 AV-006.
  • USA 200 - . Payload: NROL-28. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Military. Type: Electronic intelligence satellite. Spacecraft: Jumpseat-2. USAF Sat Cat: 32706 . COSPAR: 2008-010A. Apogee: 35,780 km (22,230 mi). Perigee: 1,112 km (690 mi). Inclination: 63.6000 deg. Classified National Reconnaisance Office satellite placed in a Molniya orbit; orbital parameters are estimated. Believed to be the second in a new series carrying combined signals intelligence and early warning payloads. Probable sensors included the SBIRS HEO-2 infrared missile early warning package and the NASA/Los Alamos TWINS-B magnetospheric research payload.

2008 March 15 - . 06:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
  • USA 201 - . Payload: GPS 2R-19M / Navstar 62 / SVN 48. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2R. USAF Sat Cat: 32711 . COSPAR: 2008-012A. Apogee: 20,223 km (12,565 mi). Perigee: 20,142 km (12,515 mi). Inclination: 55.1000 deg. Period: 718.00 min. The Delta's second stage first cutoff at 06:20 GMT put the stage and payload into a 174 km x 205 km parking orbit. The stage fired again to place the satellite into a 188 km x 20325 km x 40.0 deg transfer orbit. USA 201 fired its apogee motor at 09:21 GMT on 17 March in and placed itself into its operational final orbit.

2008 April 14 - . 20:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 421. LV Configuration: Atlas V 421 AV-014.
  • ICO G1 - . Mass: 6,600 kg (14,500 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: FS-1300. USAF Sat Cat: 32763 . COSPAR: 2008-016A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,774 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 6.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: The satellite was to provide mobile communications services for ICO Global Communications, a successor company to Teledesic..

2008 June 11 - . 16:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920H.
  • Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope - . Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Astronomy. Type: Gamma ray astronomy satellite. Spacecraft: GLAST. USAF Sat Cat: 33053 . COSPAR: 2008-029A. Apogee: 562 km (349 mi). Perigee: 542 km (336 mi). Inclination: 25.6000 deg. Period: 95.70 min. Summary: Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope; renamed Fermi GST after launch..

2008 June 20 - . 07:46 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7320-10. LV Configuration: Delta 7320-10 s/n D334.
  • Jason 2 - . Mass: 506 kg (1,115 lb). Nation: France. Agency: Martin. Class: Earth. Type: Earth resources satellite. Spacecraft: Jason. USAF Sat Cat: 33105 . COSPAR: 2008-032A. Apogee: 1,344 km (835 mi). Perigee: 1,332 km (827 mi). Inclination: 66.0000 deg. Period: 112.40 min.

2008 September 6 - . 18:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7420-10. LV Configuration: Delta 7420-10 s/n D335.
  • GeoEye-1 - . Mass: 1,923 kg (4,239 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: SA-200. USAF Sat Cat: 33331 . COSPAR: 2008-042A. Apogee: 687 km (426 mi). Perigee: 670 km (410 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 98.30 min. Summary: Commercial optical surveillance satellite with an 0.4-meter resolution. Primary customer was the US National Geospatial Intelligence Agency..

2008 October 25 - . 02:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7420-10. LV Configuration: Delta 7420-10 s/n D336.
  • COSMO 3 - . Mass: 1,900 kg (4,100 lb). Nation: Italy. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Cosmo-SkyMed. USAF Sat Cat: 33412 . COSPAR: 2008-054A. Apogee: 623 km (387 mi). Perigee: 622 km (386 mi). Inclination: 97.9000 deg. Period: 97.20 min. Summary: Part of Italy's all-weather military surveillance constellation; carried X-band synthetic aperture radar..

2009 March 7 - . 03:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-10L. LV Configuration: Delta 7920-10L s/n D339.
  • Kepler - . Mass: 1,050 kg (2,310 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Spacecraft: Kepler. USAF Sat Cat: 34380 . COSPAR: 2009-011A.

2009 March 24 - . 08:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
  • USA 203 - . Payload: Navstar 63 / GPS SVN 49. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2R. USAF Sat Cat: 34661 . COSPAR: 2009-014A. Apogee: 20,272 km (12,596 mi). Perigee: 20,093 km (12,485 mi). Inclination: 55.1000 deg. Period: 718.00 min. Summary: Carried the first civil L5 signal..

2009 April 4 - . 08:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 421.
  • USA 204 - . Payload: WGS F2. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 702. USAF Sat Cat: 34713 . COSPAR: 2009-017A. Apogee: 35,452 km (22,028 mi). Perigee: 35,397 km (21,994 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,417.60 min. Summary: Wideband Global Satcom; provided communications for the US Dept. of Defense Central Command (CENTCOM)..

2009 May 5 - . 20:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-XC.
  • USA 205 - . Payload: STSS-ATRR. Mass: 2,000 kg (4,400 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Orbital object surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: SA-200. USAF Sat Cat: 34903 . COSPAR: 2009-023A. Summary: Space Tracking and Surveillance System Advanced Technology Risk Reduction satellite..

2009 June 18 - . 21:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
  • LRO - . Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Spacecraft: LRO. USAF Sat Cat: 35315 . COSPAR: 2009-031A. Summary: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.
  • LCROSS - . Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Spacecraft: LRO. USAF Sat Cat: 35316 . COSPAR: 2009-031B. Lunar impact probe, designed to detect ice in the lunar polar regions. LCROSS and the Centaur stage flew 3270 km from the Moon at 1030 GMT on June 23 and were hurled to a 5820,00 km apogee. On 9 October LCROSS separated from the Centaur. The Centaur impacted in Cabeus crater at 11:31 GMT on 9 October followed by LCROSS at 11:35 GMT. The impacts did not produce the expected spectacular impact plume as expected. However later data reduction did show significant amounts of water.

2009 June 27 - . 22:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2) s/n D342.
  • GOES 14 - . Payload: GOES O. Mass: 3,210 kg (7,070 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Program: GOES. Spacecraft: HS 601. USAF Sat Cat: 35491 . COSPAR: 2009-033A. Apogee: 35,788 km (22,237 mi). Perigee: 35,786 km (22,236 mi). Inclination: 0.5000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite..

2009 August 17 - . 10:35 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
  • USA 206 - . Payload: GPS 50. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2R. USAF Sat Cat: 35752 . COSPAR: 2009-043A. Apogee: 20,228 km (12,569 mi). Perigee: 20,138 km (12,513 mi). Inclination: 54.9000 deg. Period: 718.00 min. Summary: Last launch from LC17A. Final Block IIR-M Global Positioning System satellite..

2009 September 8 - . 21:35 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
  • USA 207 - . Payload: PAN. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: PAN. USAF Sat Cat: 35815 . COSPAR: 2009-047A. Summary: Classified communications satellite, perhaps providing services for the CIA to replace channels hosted on the US Navy's UHF Follow-On series. Stationed in geostationary orbit at 34 deg E..

2009 September 25 - . 12:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-X. LV Configuration: Delta 7920-X s/n D344.
  • USA 208 - . Payload: STSS 1. Mass: 1,122 kg (2,473 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Military. Type: Anti-satellite system target. Spacecraft: STSS. USAF Sat Cat: 35937 . COSPAR: 2009-052A. Summary: Space Tracking and Surveillance System for missile launch and flight monitoring using infrared sensors..
  • USA 209 - . Payload: STSS 2. Mass: 1,122 kg (2,473 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Military. Type: Anti-satellite system target. Spacecraft: STSS. USAF Sat Cat: 35937 . COSPAR: 2009-052A. Summary: Space Tracking and Surveillance System for missile launch and flight monitoring using infrared sensors..

2009 October 8 - . 18:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-X. LV Configuration: Delta 7920-X s/n D345.
  • WorldView-2 - . Mass: 2,615 kg (5,765 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: WorldView. USAF Sat Cat: 35946 . COSPAR: 2009-055A. Apogee: 769 km (477 mi). Perigee: 766 km (475 mi). Inclination: 98.5000 deg. Period: 100.20 min. Summary: Commercial 0.5-meter-resolution, 8-band imaging satellite..

2009 October 18 - . 16:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V 401 s/n AV017.
  • USA 210 - . Payload: DMSP 5D F-18. Mass: 1,200 kg (2,600 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: DMSP Block 5D-3. USAF Sat Cat: 35951 . COSPAR: 2009-057A. Apogee: 858 km (533 mi). Perigee: 843 km (523 mi). Inclination: 98.9000 deg. Period: 101.90 min. Summary: Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. After release of the weather satellite the Centaur AV-017 upper stage was tested, having enough propellant left over to escape the earth's gravity and enter solar orbit..

2009 November 23 - . 06:55 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 431. LV Configuration: Atlas V 431 s/n AV024.
  • Intelsat IS-14 - . Mass: 5,663 kg (12,484 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Program: Intelsat. Spacecraft: FS-1300. USAF Sat Cat: 36097 . COSPAR: 2009-064A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,775 km (22,229 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Communications satellite to replace IS-1R at 24 deg W over the Atlantic. The Centaur AV-024 upper stage maneuvered and then released the satellite into a 6157 km x 39094 km x 22.5 deg geosynchronous transfer orbit at 08:53 GMT. IS-14 then used its own propulsion to reach its operational orbit. Mass 2517 kg unfuelled.

2009 December 6 - . 01:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (5.4).
  • USA 211 - . Payload: WGS 3. Mass: 5,990 kg (13,200 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 702. USAF Sat Cat: 36108 . COSPAR: 2009-068A. Apogee: 64,827 km (40,281 mi). Perigee: 31,268 km (19,428 mi). Inclination: 0.6000 deg. Period: 2,106.00 min. Summary: US Army Wideband Global Satcom, carried X-band and Ka-band communications payloads..

2009 December 14 - . 14:09 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7320-10. LV Configuration: Delta 7320-10 s/n D347.
  • WISE - . Mass: 674 kg (1,485 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Spacecraft: RS-300. USAF Sat Cat: 36119 . COSPAR: 2009-071A. Apogee: 532 km (330 mi). Perigee: 527 km (327 mi). Inclination: 97.5000 deg. Period: 95.20 min. Wide Field Infrared Explorer astronomy satellite, designed to conduct an all-sky survey at infrared frequencies of 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns, detecting objects 100 times fainter than the earlier IRAS and Akari satellites. Primary instrument is a 40 cm telescope cooled to 12 K by a cryostat filled with solid hydrogen. The survey was expected to detect tens of thousands of new asteroids, brown dwarf stars, and planets orbiting nearby stars.

2010 February 11 - . 15:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V s/n AV-021.
  • SDO - . Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Spacecraft: SDO. USAF Sat Cat: 36395 . COSPAR: 2010-005A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,773 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 28.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Solar Dynamics Observatory. The Centaur AV-021 upper stage moved from an initial 175 km x 3706 km x 28.7 deg parking orbit to a 2480 km x 35369 km x 28.6 deg transfer orbitand then released the satellite, which used its own R4D thruster to reach geosynchronous orbit.

2010 March 4 - . 23:57 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2) s/n D348.
  • GOES 15 - . Mass: 3,240 kg (7,140 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Program: GOES. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: HS 601. USAF Sat Cat: 36411 . COSPAR: 2010-008A. Apogee: 35,803 km (22,246 mi). Perigee: 35,770 km (22,220 mi). Inclination: 0.3000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min.

2010 April 22 - . 23:52 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501.
  • USA 212 - . Payload: X-37B OTV 1. Mass: 5,000 kg (11,000 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Spacecraft: X-37. Duration: 224.39 days. USAF Sat Cat: 36514 . COSPAR: 2010-015A. Summary: Reusable unmanned military orbital spaceplane. Landed successfully at Vandenberg at 09:16 GMT on 3 December..

2010 May 28 - . 03:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2).
  • USA 213 - . Payload: Navstar 65 / GPS SVN 62 IIF SV-1. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2F. USAF Sat Cat: 36585 . COSPAR: 2010-022A. Apogee: 20,225 km (12,567 mi). Perigee: 20,188 km (12,544 mi). Inclination: 55.0000 deg. Period: 719.00 min. Summary: First Block IIF Global Positioning System satellite. Supported the L1M and L2M military GPS channels, the L2C civilian channel and a new L5 civilian channel. Also included a nuclear explosion detection system..

2010 August 14 - . 11:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 531.
  • USA 214 - . Payload: AEHF SV-1. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: AEHF. USAF Sat Cat: 36868 . COSPAR: 2010-039A. Apogee: 51,018 km (31,701 mi). Perigee: 12,053 km (7,489 mi). Inclination: 9.9000 deg. Period: 1,224.50 min. First USAF Advanced EHF communications satellite. Placed in an initial 221 x 50179 km x 22.2 deg geosynchronous transfer orbit by the Atlas Centaur upper stage. However the satellite's main BT-4 engine failed, meaning the secondary hydrazine thrusters were used to much more satellite raise the spacecraft to geosynchronous orbit.

2010 September 21 - . 04:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501. LV Configuration: Atlas AV-025.
  • USA 215 - . Payload: NROL-41. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: Lacrosse. USAF Sat Cat: 37162 . COSPAR: 2010-046A. Apogee: 1,105 km (686 mi). Perigee: 1,102 km (684 mi). Inclination: 123.0000 deg. Summary: Believed to be a surveillance radarsat, in an unusual retrograde, higher altitude orbit than previous versions..

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