Encyclopedia Astronautica
Haignere



ihainere.jpg
Haignere
Credit: www.spacefacts.de - www.spacefacts.de
Haignere, Jean-Pierre (1948-) French test pilot cosmonaut. Flew on Mir Altair, Mir EO-27. Was married to astronaut Claudie Andre-Deshays.

Educated Salon; ETPS; Patuxent. Total EVA Time: 0.26 days. Number of EVAs: 1.


ESA Official Biography

Jean-Pierre Haigneré

BIRTHPLACE AND DATE: Paris, France, 19 May 1948.

EDUCATION: Graduated as an engineer from the French Air Force Academy at Salon de Provence in 1971. Qualified as a fighter pilot at Tours in 1973. In 1981, graduated from the Empire Test Pilots School (ETPS) at Boscombe Down, England, where he won the "Hawker Hunter" and "Patuxent shield" awards. Studied astrophysics at the University of Orsay, France, from 1986 to 1987.

FAMILY: Separated, three children.

RECREATIONAL INTERESTS: Flying all types of aircraft (sea floats, WW2 fighter planes, helicopters), golf, funboard, playing saxophone and reading.

ORGANISATIONS: Jean-Pierre Haigneré is "corresponding member" of the Académie de l'Air et de l'Espace and Chairman of the space committee at the Aéroclub de France.

EXPERIENCE: From 1973 until 1980, Jean-Pierre Haigneré was a fighter pilot, then Squadron Leader on Mirage 5 and Mirage IIIE aircraft. He was posted to the Bretigny-sur-Orge Flight Test Centre in 1981 as the project test pilot for the Mirage 2000N aircraft and was appointed Chief Test Pilot in 1983.

He has logged 5,500 hours flying on 105 different types of aircraft, including 1,800 hours of test flight time. He holds a commission as Colonel in the French Air Force. He also holds current test pilot and air transport professional licences, Airbus A300 and A320 qualifications, helicopter private licence, mountain and seaplane rating.

Jean-Pierre Haigneré was selected as an astronaut by the French National Space Agency (CNES) in September 1985. From 1986 to 1989, he headed the Manned Flight Division of the Hermes and Manned Flight Directorate, and took part in preliminary studies for the Hermes spaceplane. He also developed and fine-tuned the Zero G Caravelle programme (parabolic flights), subsequently becoming technical and operational officer-in-charge.

From December 1990, Jean-Pierre Haigneré underwent training at Star City, near Moscow, as a back-up crew member for the French-Russian Antares spaceflight. He was selected as prime crew for the Altaïr mission in 1992, undergoing seven month training for a 21-day mission on board the Mir space station which successfully took place from 1 to 22 July, 1993.

In 1995 and 1996, he was involved at the Kaliningrad Russian Space Control Centre in the operational aspects of the ESA Euromir 95 and French Cassiopée manned spaceflights. He then returned to France where he was in charge, as test pilot, of flight assessment of the new Airbus Zero-G aircraft.In 1995 and 1996, he was involved at the Kaliningrad Russian Space Control Centre in the operational aspects of the ESA Euromir 95 and French Cassiopée manned spaceflights. He then returned to France where he was in charge, as test pilot, of flight assessment of the new Airbus Zero-G aircraft.

From 1997 to February 1998, Jean-Pierre Haigneré trained at Star City as a back-up crew member for the 6th French-Russian Pegasus spaceflight.

SPECIAL HONOURS: Jean-Pierre Haigneré is an "Officier de la Légion d'Honneur" and "Chevalier de l'Ordre National du Mérite". He holds the Russian "Order of Friendship" and the Russian "Medal for Personal Courage", awarded by President Yeltsin. He was awarded the "Grand Prix de l'Académie de Lutèce" in 1994.

CURRENT ASSIGNMENT: In June 1998, Jean-Pierre Haigneré joined ESA's single European astronaut corps, whose homebase is ESA's European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany. He flew the French-Russian Perseus mission, on board Mir, from February to August 1999.

September 1999

Birth Place: Paris.
Status: Inactive.


Born: 1948.05.19.
Spaceflights: 2 .
Total time in space: 209.52 days.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Cosmonaut Category of persons who have been trained for spaceflight in Russia. More...

Associated Flights
  • Mir Antares Crew: Tognini. French astronaut; primary mission to swap Soyuz lifeboats at station. Backup crew: Haignere. More...
  • Mir EO-13 Crew: Manakov, Polishchuk. Soyuz carried the APAS androgynous docking system instead of the usual probe system. Backup crew: Usachyov, Tsibliyev. More...
  • Mir Altair Crew: Haignere. French astronaut; primary mission to swap Soyuz lifeboats at station. Backup crew: Andre-Deshays. More...
  • Mir Pegase Crew: Eyharts. French astronaut; primary mission swap of Soyuz lifeboats. Record 13 persons in space at same time. Backup crew: Haignere. More...
  • Mir EO-27 Crew: Afanasyev, Haignere. Afansyev was the only Russian cosmonaut aboard, since two crew seats had been sold to Slovakia and France. Avdeyev, already aboard Mir, would stay as Afanasyev's crewmate. Backup crew: Sharipov, Andre-Deshays. More...
  • Mir Stefanik Crew: Bella. First Slovak astronaut. Mission to swap Soyuz lifeboats docked to station. Backup crew: Fuller. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
Associated Programs
  • Mir The Mir space station was the last remnant of the once mighty Soviet space programme. It was built to last only five years, and was to have been composed of modules launched by Proton and Buran/Energia launch vehicles. These modules were derived from those originally designed by Chelomei in the 1960's for the Almaz military station programme. As the Soviet Union collapsed Mir stayed in orbit, but the final modules were years late and could only be completed with American financial assistance. Kept flying over a decade beyond its rated life, Mir proved a source of pride to the Russian people and proved the ability of their cosmonauts and engineers to improvise and keep operations going despite all manner of challenges and mishaps. More...

Haignere Chronology


1985 September 9 - .
  • CNES Astronaut Training Group 1 selected. - . Nation: France. Related Persons: Andre-Deshays; Haignere. Summary: French astronauts trained for flights to the Mir space station..

1992 July 27 - . 06:08 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U2.
  • Soyuz TM-15 - . Call Sign: Rodnik (Spring - water spring). Crew: Avdeyev; Solovyov; Tognini. Backup Crew: Haignere; Manakov; Polishchuk. Payload: Soyuz TM 11F732 s/n 65. Mass: 7,150 kg (15,760 lb). Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Avdeyev; Solovyov; Tognini; Haignere; Manakov; Polishchuk. Agency: MOM. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-12; Mir Antares; Mir EO-11. Spacecraft: Soyuz TM. Duration: 188.90 days. Decay Date: 1993-02-01 . USAF Sat Cat: 22054 . COSPAR: 1992-046A. Apogee: 216 km (134 mi). Perigee: 196 km (121 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 88.60 min. Mir Expedition EO-12. Russian astronauts Solovyov and Avdeev and French astronaut Tognini were inserted into an initial 190 x 200 km orbit inclined 51.6 deg. Later on July 27 they maneuvered to a 223 x 343 km orbit, and on July 28 docked with Mir in its 405 x 410 km orbit.

1993 July 1 - . 14:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U2.
  • Soyuz TM-17 - . Call Sign: Sirius (Sirius ). Crew: Haignere; Serebrov; Tsibliyev. Backup Crew: Afanasyev; Andre-Deshays; Usachyov. Payload: Soyuz TM 11F732 s/n 66. Mass: 7,150 kg (15,760 lb). Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Haignere; Serebrov; Tsibliyev; Afanasyev; Andre-Deshays; Usachyov. Agency: MOM. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-14; Mir Altair; Mir EO-13. Spacecraft: Soyuz TM. Duration: 196.74 days. Decay Date: 1994-02-14 . USAF Sat Cat: 22704 . COSPAR: 1993-043A. Apogee: 397 km (246 mi). Perigee: 388 km (241 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.40 min. Mir Expedition EO-14. Carried Vasili Tsibliyev, Alexander Serebrov, Jean-Pierre Haignere to Mir; returned Serebrov, Tsibliyev to Earth. Progress M-18 undocked from Mir's front port at around 17:25 GMT on July 3, and Soyuz TM-17 docked at the same port only 20 minutes later at 17:45 GMT.

1993 July 22 - .
1998 January 29 - . 16:33 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U.
  • Soyuz TM-27 - . Call Sign: Kristall. Crew: Musabayev; Budarin; Eyharts. Backup Crew: Afanasyev; Treshchev; Haignere. Payload: Soyuz TM 11F732 s/n 76. Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Musabayev; Budarin; Eyharts; Afanasyev; Treshchev; Haignere. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-25; Mir Pegase; Mir NASA-5; Mir EO-24; STS-89; Mir NASA-6. Spacecraft: Soyuz TM. Duration: 207.53 days. Decay Date: 1998-08-25 . USAF Sat Cat: 25146 . COSPAR: 1998-004A. Apogee: 373 km (231 mi). Perigee: 363 km (225 mi). Inclination: 51.7000 deg. Period: 91.90 min. Soyuz TM-27 carried the Mir EO-25 crew and French astronaut Leopold Eyharts. NASA and the Russian Space Agency had hoped Soyuz TM-27 could dock with Mir while Endeavour was still there, resulting in an on-board crew of 13, a record which would have stood for years or decades. But the French vetoed this, saying the commotion and time wasted would ruin Eyharts Pegase experimental programme. Soyuz TM-27 docked at the Kvant module port at 17:54 GMT on January 31, 1998, less than five hours before Endeavour landed in Florida.

    Solovyov handed over command of Mir to EO-25 commander Musabayev, and the Mir EO-24 crew and Eyharts undocked from the forward port of Mir at 05:52 GMT on February 19 aboard the Soyuz TM-26 for their return home. On February 20, the EO-25 crew and Andy Thomas of the NASA-7 mission boarded Soyuz TM-27 and undocked from the Kvant port at 08:48 GMT. They redocked with the forward port on Mir at 09:32 GMT. This freed up the Kvant port for a test redocking of the Progress M-37 cargo ship, parked in a following orbit with Mir during the crew transfer.


1999 February 20 - . 04:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U M15000-662.
  • Soyuz TM-29 - . Call Sign: Derbent. Crew: Afanasyev; Haignere; Bella. Payload: Soyuz TM 11F732 s/n 78. Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Afanasyev; Haignere; Bella. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-27; Mir Stefanik; Mir EO-26; Mir EO-26/-27. Spacecraft: Soyuz TM. Duration: 188.85 days. Decay Date: 1999-08-28 . USAF Sat Cat: 25632 . COSPAR: 1999-007A. Apogee: 357 km (221 mi). Perigee: 341 km (211 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.52 min. Soyuz TM-29 docked with Mir on February 22 at 05:36 GMT. Since two crew seats had been sold (to Slovakia and France), Afansyev was the only Russian cosmonaut aboard. This meant that Russian engineer Avdeyev already aboard Mir would have to accept a double-length assignment. After the February 27 departure of EO-26 crew commander Padalka and Slovak cosmonaut Bella aboard Soyuz TM-28, the new EO-27 Mir crew consisted of Afanasyev as Commander, Avdeyev as Engineer and French cosmonaut Haignere. Follwoing an extended mission and three space walks, the last operational crew aboard Mir prepared to return. The station was powered down and prepared for free drift mode.

1999 April 16 - . 04:37 GMT - .
  • EVA Mir EO-27-1 - . Crew: Afanasyev; Haignere. EVA Type: Extra-Vehicular Activity. EVA Duration: 0.26 days. Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Afanasyev; Haignere. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned space station. Flight: Mir EO-27; Mir EO-26/-27. Spacecraft: Mir. Summary: Haignere launched by hand the Sputnik-99 amateur radio satellite, delivered to Mir by Progress M-41..

1999 August 28 - .
  • Landing of Soyuz TM-29 - . Return Crew: Afanasyev; Haignere; Avdeyev. Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Afanasyev; Haignere; Avdeyev. Program: Mir. Flight: Mir EO-27; Mir EO-26/-27. The hatch between Mir and Soyuz was closed at 18:12 GMT on August 27, 1999. Soyuz TM-29 undocked from Mir at 21:17 GMT with Afanasyev, Avdeyev and Haignere aboard. The Mir EO-27 crew landed in Kazakhstan at 00:35 GMT on August 28. Afanasyev had set a new cumulative time in space record, but for the first time since September 1989 there were no humans in space.

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