Encyclopedia Astronautica
Apollo RM



apocsmrm.jpg
Apollo CSM + RM
In 1967 it was planned that Saturn IB-launched Orbital Workshops would be resupplied by Apollo CSM spacecraft and Resource Modules (RM) with up to three tonnes of supplies and instruments. Following launch by a Saturn IB, the Apollo would back away. Then it would transpose and dock with the RM. These RM's could be left docked to the Workshop. Later the Orbital Workshop became Skylab, launched by Saturn V, and the RM's were not needed. A descendent of the RM flew as the Apollo-Soyuz Docking Module.
Credit: McDonnell Douglas Big Gemini Briefing, Dec 1967
American logistics spacecraft. Study 1967. In 1967 it was planned that Saturn IB-launched Orbital Workshops would be supplied by Apollo CSM spacecraft and Resupply Modules (RM) with up to three metric tons of supplies and instruments.

Following launch by a Saturn IB, the Apollo would back away, transpose, and dock with the RM, just as with the Lunar Module for the lunar missions. These modules could be left docked to the Workshop docking module. Later the Orbital Workshop became Skylab, launched by a Saturn V, and the RM's were not needed. However a descendent of the RM flew in the form of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Docking Module.

An even earlier iteration of the concept was in 1963. In 1962 NASA funded studies with several contractors on Operations and Logistics for Space Stations. North American's study was dated 18 March 1963 and proposed two alternatives, the first of which was an 'Apollo-I' derivative of Apollo, with a cargo resupply module.

Crew Size: 3. Orbital Storage: 90 days. Habitable Volume: 6.20 m3. RCS total impulse: 3,530 kgf-sec. Spacecraft delta v: 200 m/s (650 ft/sec). Electric System: 670.00 kWh. Electric System: 6.30 average kW.

AKA: Resupply Module; Apollo-I.
Gross mass: 18,600 kg (41,000 lb).
Unfuelled mass: 17,400 kg (38,300 lb).
Payload: 3,000 kg (6,600 lb).
Thrust: 97.86 kN (22,000 lbf).
Specific impulse: 314 s.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Engines
  • AJ10-137 Aerojet N2O4/Aerozine-50 rocket engine. 97.5 kN. Apollo SPS. Out of Production. Pressure-fed engine. Used as Apollo SM engine. Isp=312s. More...

See also
  • US Space Stations Wernher von Braun brought Noordung's rotating station design with him from Europe. This he popularized in the early 1950's in selling manned space flight to the American public. By the late 1950's von Braun's team favoured the spent-stage concept - which eventually flew as Skylab. By the mid-1960's, NASA was concentrating on modular, purpose-built, zero-G stations. These eventually flew as the International Space Station. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Saturn I American orbital launch vehicle. Von Braun launch vehicle known as 'Cluster's Last Stand' - 8 Redstone tanks around a Jupiter tank core,powered by eight Jupiter engines. Originally intended as the launch vehicle for Apollo manned circumlunar flights. However it was developed so early, no payloads were available for it. More...
  • Saturn IB American orbital launch vehicle. Improved Saturn I, with uprated first stage and Saturn IVB second stage (common with Saturn V) replacing Saturn IV. Used for earth orbit flight tests of Apollo CSM and LM. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • NASA American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA, USA. More...
  • North American American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. North American, Palmdale, El Segundo. Downey, CA, USA More...

Associated Propellants
  • N2O4/UDMH Nitrogen tetroxide became the storable liquid propellant of choice from the late 1950's. Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine ((CH3)2NNH2) became the storable liquid fuel of choice by the mid-1950's. Development of UDMH in the Soviet Union began in 1949. It is used in virtually all storable liquid rocket engines except for some orbital manoeuvring engines in the United States, where MMH has been preferred due to a slightly higher density and performance. More...

Bibliography
  • Big G, Briefing, McDonnell Douglas, 20 December 1967.

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