Encyclopedia Astronautica
AprizeSat



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Aprize
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AprizeSat
American civilian store-dump communications satellite. 8 launches from 2002.12.20 (LatinSat 1). Aprize's satellites were miniature spacecraft designed and optimized for data relay with very low power consumption.

Excluding antennas, each satellite was a cube only 20 cm on a side and weighing less than 12 kg. Each satellite contained ten radio receivers, two agile transmitters and up to twelve megabytes of solid-state data storage. Only one watt of power was needed to power the satellite.

Aprize Satellite's proprietary spacecraft design reduced the construction and launch cost for a Little LEO satellite constellation by almost an order of magnitude. While others had an estimated cost of $350 to $600 million for the construction and launch of a Little LEO constellation of 24 to 48 satellites, Aprize could deploy a comparable system for $60 million.

This significant cost reduction was the direct result of a unique system architecture that eliminated the need for an active satellite attitude control system using thrusters.

The initial Aprize system was to include six communication satellites in low-Earth orbits. These satellites circled the earth 14 times each day, receiving data signals from all the active user equipment, and polling those from which data was specifically requested. Each satellite stored the data it received until a Regional Satellite Node (RSN) was within view, at which time the satellite transmitted the data to the RSN.

After the data relay market was sufficiently developed, up to 42 more satellites were to be deployed into similar orbits. These additional satellites would increase the data relay capacity, system redundancy and global coverage.

The radios used for communications operated in the UHF frequency band authorized by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) for Non-Voice, Non-Geostationary Mobile Satellite Services (NVNG MSS).

The small physical size of a spacecraft limited the amount of power generation possible with a the limited solar panel area. Through the use of high-efficiency Gallium Arsenide solar panels, low-power circuit designs and microelectronic components, Aprize was able to reduce the total power consumption of the spacecraft bus to less than one watt.

By operating the satellite's high-power transmitter only during those times when it was actually communicating with User Terminals, it was possible to extract the needed power from six nickel cadmium batteries, and then recharge the batteries during the non-operating portion of the satellite's orbit.

Using this strategy, each satellite could collect data from more than 100,000 worldwide User Terminals daily.

Gross mass: 12 kg (26 lb).
First Launch: 2002.12.20.
Last Launch: 2011.08.17.
Number: 8 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • R-36M The super-heavy Ukrainian R-36M ICBM replaced the R-36 in 288 existing silos and was additionally installed in 20 new super-hardened silos. The fall of the Soviet Union ended production and the need for replacement. Nevertheless they remained in Russian service into the 21st Century, some being modified for use as space launchers. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • R-36M Ukrainian intercontinental ballistic missile. The R-36M replaced the R-36 in 288 existing silos and was additionally installed in 20 new super-hardened silos. More...
  • Dnepr Ukrainian orbital launch vehicle based on decommissioned R-36M2 intercontinental ballistic missiles. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Aprize Argentinan manufacturer of spacecraft. Aprize Satellite, Argentina. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...

AprizeSat Chronology


2002 December 20 - . 17:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC109. Launch Pad: LC109/95. LV Family: R-36M. Launch Vehicle: Dnepr.
  • LatinSat 1 - . Payload: AprizeSat 3. Mass: 12 kg (26 lb). Nation: Argentina. Agency: Aprize. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: AprizeSat. USAF Sat Cat: 27605 . COSPAR: 2002-058A. Apogee: 679 km (421 mi). Perigee: 635 km (394 mi). Inclination: 64.6000 deg. Period: 97.90 min. Summary: Messaging satellite..
  • LatinSat 2 - . Payload: AprizeSat 4. Mass: 12 kg (26 lb). Nation: Argentina. Agency: Aprize. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: AprizeSat. USAF Sat Cat: 27606 . COSPAR: 2002-058B. Apogee: 702 km (436 mi). Perigee: 632 km (392 mi). Inclination: 64.6000 deg. Period: 98.10 min. Summary: Messaging satellite..

2004 June 29 - . 06:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC109. Launch Pad: LC109/95. LV Family: R-36M. Launch Vehicle: Dnepr.
  • Aprizesat 2 (LatinSat D) - . Mass: 12 kg (26 lb). Nation: Argentina. Agency: Aprize. Program: AIS. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian store-dump communications satellite. Spacecraft: AprizeSat. USAF Sat Cat: 28366 . COSPAR: 2004-025A. Apogee: 853 km (530 mi). Perigee: 695 km (431 mi). Inclination: 98.3000 deg. Period: 100.30 min. Summary: Delayed from March. 31.
  • Aprizesat 1 (LatinSat C) - . Mass: 12 kg (26 lb). Nation: Argentina. Agency: Makeyev. Program: AIS. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian store-dump communications satellite. Spacecraft: AprizeSat. USAF Sat Cat: 28372 . COSPAR: 2004-025G. Apogee: 767 km (476 mi). Perigee: 698 km (433 mi). Inclination: 98.3000 deg. Period: 99.50 min.

2009 July 29 - . 18:46 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC109. LV Family: R-36M. Launch Vehicle: Dnepr.
  • Aprizesat 4 - . Nation: Argentina. Agency: Makeyev. Program: AIS. Spacecraft: Aprizesat. USAF Sat Cat: 35684 . COSPAR: 2009-041D. Apogee: 677 km (420 mi). Perigee: 607 km (377 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 97.60 min. Summary: Spacequest, Fairfax, Virginia..
  • Aprizesat 3 - . Nation: Argentina. Agency: Makeyev. Program: AIS. Spacecraft: Aprizesat. USAF Sat Cat: 35686 . COSPAR: 2009-041F. Apogee: 677 km (420 mi). Perigee: 566 km (351 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 97.10 min. Summary: Spacequest, Fairfax, Virginia..

2011 August 17 - . 07:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Dombarovskiy. LV Family: R-36M. Launch Vehicle: Dnepr.
  • Aprizesat 5 - . Mass: 14 kg (30 lb). Nation: USA. Program: AIS. Class: Communications. Type: Communications satellite. Spacecraft: Aprizesat. USAF Sat Cat: 37792 . COSPAR: 2011-044E. Apogee: 697 km (433 mi). Perigee: 610 km (370 mi). Inclination: 98.3000 deg. Period: 97.80 min. Aprizesat 5 and 6 were built by SpaceQuest for exactEarth Ltd. Equipped with AIS (maritime Automatic Identification System) payloads for ship location tracking. The exactEarth system also included the SpaceQuest AprizeSat 3 and 4, and a payload attached to ISRO's ResourceSat-2 satellite.
  • Aprizesat 6 - . Mass: 14 kg (30 lb). Nation: USA. Program: AIS. Class: Communications. Type: Communications satellite. Spacecraft: Aprizesat. USAF Sat Cat: 37793 . COSPAR: 2011-044F. Apogee: 698 km (433 mi). Perigee: 627 km (389 mi). Inclination: 98.3000 deg. Period: 98.00 min.

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