Encyclopedia Astronautica
DART


American rendezvous technology satellite. One launch, 2005.04.15. Autonomous Rendezvous Technology mission, planned to guide itself to within a few meters of a US satellite.

First Launch: 2005.04.15.
Number: 1 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Pegasus Privately-funded, air-launched winged light satellite launcher. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Pegasus American air-launched orbital launch vehicle. Privately-funded, air-launched winged light satellite launcher. More...
  • Pegasus XL/HAPS American air-launched orbital launch vehicle. Five stage version consisting of 1 x L-1011 + 1 x Pegasus XL stage 1 + 1 x Orion 50XL + 1 x Orion 38 + 1 x HAPS More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, DART Press Kit, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, DART Fact Sheeet, Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Point Arguello WADZ Air-launched rocket drop zone known to have been used for 28 launches from 1990 to 2007, reaching up to 4539 kilometers altitude. More...

DART Chronology


2005 April 15 - . 17:26 GMT - . Launch Site: Point Arguello WADZ. Launch Pad: 36.0 N x 123.0 W. LV Family: Pegasus. Launch Vehicle: Pegasus XL/HAPS. LV Configuration: Pegasus XL/HAPS F36.
  • DART - . Mass: 360 kg (790 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: OSC. Class: Technology. Type: Rendezvous technology satellite. Spacecraft: DART. USAF Sat Cat: 28642 . COSPAR: 2005-014A. Apogee: 747 km (464 mi). Perigee: 395 km (245 mi). Inclination: 96.6000 deg. Period: 96.10 min. Delayed from April 15; October 18, 19, 26, 28; Nov. 4, 9 and 11; 2004, and March 2, 2005. Autonomous Rendezvous Technology mission, planned to guide itself to within a few metres of a US satellite. On April 16, DART closed within 100 m of the MUBLCOM satellite, then evidently began a series of out-of-control maneuvers resulting in an in-space collission and MUBLCOM being bumped into a 3 to 5 km higher orbit. Remarkably both satellites continued to function. DART then detected that it was running unexpectedly low on nitrogen cold gas used for orientation. Its autonomous software aborted further rendezvous operations and the DART was deorbited shortly thereafter.

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