Encyclopedia Astronautica
Flight Telerobotic Servicer



frsmm891.jpg
FRS Martin 1989
Flight Robotic Servicer. NASA decided to develop a $288-million Flight Telerobotic Servicer in 1987 after Congress voiced concern about American competitiveness in the field of robotics.
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos
frs891.jpg
FRS 1989
Flight Robotic Servicer
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos
American logistics spacecraft. Study 1987. NASA decided to develop a $288-million Flight Telerobotic Servicer in 1987 after Congress voiced concern about American competitiveness in the field of robotics.

The FTS would also help astronauts assemble the Space Station, which was growing bigger and more complex with each redesign.

Martin Marietta and Grumman received $1.5-million study contracts in November 1987. Martin Marietta received a $297-million contract in May 1989 to develop a vehicle by 1993. The Bush Administration briefly tried to commercialize the FTS project in early 1989. The contractors objected since the FTS had no commercial customers. The FTS was then combined with the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle into the Robotic Satellite Servicer concept.

Article by Marcus Lindroos

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Associated Countries
See also
  • US Space Stations Wernher von Braun brought Noordung's rotating station design with him from Europe. This he popularized in the early 1950's in selling manned space flight to the American public. By the late 1950's von Braun's team favoured the spent-stage concept - which eventually flew as Skylab. By the mid-1960's, NASA was concentrating on modular, purpose-built, zero-G stations. These eventually flew as the International Space Station. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • NASA American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA, USA. More...
  • Martin American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956), Denver, CO, USA. More...

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