Encyclopedia Astronautica
FY-3


Chinese new generation polar orbit weather satellite. Operational, first launched 2008.05.27. The FY-3 was equipped with new global, all-weather, multi-spectral, three-dimensional sensors.

The new satellite, an improved version of the Feng Yun 1, had a resolution of 250 m and a mass of 2,200 kg with a design life of two years.

The draft project for the Chinese new generation polar orbit weather satellite Fengyun-3 (FY-3) was approved at a review meeting held on October 29-30 1998 in Beijing. The 8th Academy of China Aerospace Corporation, Shanghai Academy of Space Technology was responsible for the development of the satellite. In July 2000 it was indicated that China planned to launch ten advanced meteorological satellites into orbit in 2000-2010 to improve the accuracy of its weather and natural disaster forecasts. The Chinese Government had approved the plan to develop and launch the satellites at a cost of well over one billion dollars. The satellites, together with the five meteorological satellites still orbiting the earth, would allow China to form a complete meteorological satellite system. Six of these meteorological satellites would be orbited from 2002 to 2008 to offer comprehensive weather services for the 2008 Olympic Games. Among these would be FY-3A in 2004, FY-3B in 2006, and FY-3C in 2008.

Gross mass: 2,200 kg (4,800 lb).
First Launch: 2008.05.27.
Last Launch: 2010.11.05.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • CZ China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • CZ Chinese orbital launch vehicle. China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...
  • CZ-4C Chinese orbital launch vehicle. The CZ-4C, first flown in 2007, had an upgraded second-stage engine that could be restarted in space. The vehicle also had structural rings at the base of the first and second stages, an interstage weather cover,ejected at liftoff, and the larger payload shroud introduced on the CZ-4B. All of these indicated that the vehicle was designed to take larger payloads to higher, more precise orbits than the CZ-4B. More...

Bibliography
  • Chen Lan, Dragon in Space, Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Taiyuan China's launch site for launch of polar orbiting satellites, also known as Wuzhai. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) is situated in Kelan County, the northwest part of Shanxi Province, 280 km by road from Taiyuan City. More...

FY-3 Chronology


2008 May 27 - . 03:02 GMT - . Launch Site: Taiyuan. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-4C.
  • FY-3A - . Nation: China. Agency: SISE. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-3. USAF Sat Cat: 32958 . COSPAR: 2008-026A. Apogee: 828 km (514 mi). Perigee: 826 km (513 mi). Inclination: 98.8000 deg. Period: 101.40 min. Summary: Polar orbiting weather satellite. The FY-3 series will replace the older FY-1 polar system..

2010 November 5 - . 18:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Taiyuan. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-4C.
  • FY-3B - . Payload: Fengyun 3 (01 B. Nation: China. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-3. USAF Sat Cat: 37214 . COSPAR: 2010-059A. Apogee: 828 km (514 mi). Perigee: 825 km (512 mi). Inclination: 98.7000 deg. Period: 101.40 min. Summary: Second polar orbiting FY-3 weather satellite..

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