Encyclopedia Astronautica
GE Life Raft



gelrec.jpg
GE Life Raft
General Electric Life Raft 3-crew orbital escape system of the 1960's
American manned rescue spacecraft. Study 1966. The GE Life raft was a rigid unpressurized aeroshell. Three crew in space suits with parachutes would strap themselves into the seats.

A headup display was provided for manually aligning the raft for retrofire, which was accomplished using a cold gas reaction control system. The aeroshell itself consisted of new non-ablative materials with a foam core. Mass per crew: 80 kg.

Crew Size: 3.

AKA: General Electric Life Raft.
Gross mass: 420 kg (920 lb).
Height: 1.80 m (5.90 ft).
Span: 3.00 m (9.80 ft).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Rescue In the early 1960's, in the hey-day of the X-20 Dynasoar, it seemed that the US military would naturally keep building military aerospacecraft that would just keep going higher and faster. It was also supposed that the pilot would have to be given the equivalent of an ejection seat - some means of bailing out of the spacecraft in case of catastrophic failure or enemy attack. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • GE American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. General Electric Corporation, USA. More...

Associated Propellants
  • Solid Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. More...

Bibliography
  • Kane, Francis X, "A Thirty Year Perspective on Manned Space Safety and Rescue: Where We've Been; Where We Are; Where We Are Going", IAA, IAA 84-270, 1984.

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use