Encyclopedia Astronautica
HARP 7-1



harp7inc.jpg
HARP 7 inch Gun
7a5prob2.jpg
HARP 7 & 5 in probes
From left to right: HARP 7-1, 7-2, 5-1, and 5-3.
Canadian earth atmosphere suborbital probe. Flights from 1961. The original HARP 7-1 gun probe was fundamentally a scaled up version of the 5-1 gun probe and was used for similar payloads.

The 7-1 probe had a mean diameter of 91 mm, a length of 1640 mm, and a flight weight of 27.3 kg. The vehicle was launched at a velocity of 1650 m/s (5400 ft/sec) with a 50 kg (110 lb) charge of M17 propellant.

The 7-1 probe, although serviceable as an atmospheric tool, failed to reach its theoretical apogee in test flights. Although directly scaled from the 5-1 vehicle, it was not optimal for the 7 inch gun ballistics and was simply too heavy. A new vehicle was designed to take these factors into account and the 7-2 probe was created.

by Richard K Graf

Gross mass: 27 kg (60 lb).
Height: 1.64 m (5.38 ft).
Span: 0.18 m (0.58 ft).

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Associated Countries
See also
  • Gun-launched Artillery dominated military ballistics from the earliest use of gunpowder. In 1865 Jules Verne could only realistically consider a cannon for a moon launch in his influential novel. Even after the rocket established its primacy as a method of accessing space, Canadian Gerald Bull began a life-long struggle to use guns for cheap access to space. His successes could not generate funding to continue. Others since then have pursued the technology, convinced it was the only way for low-cost delivery of payloads to orbit. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • 7 inch HARP Gun Canadian gun-launched sounding rocket. The highly successful 5 inch HARP gun had demonstrated the immense versatility of small portable gun systems for atmospheric exploration. The 7 inch HARP gun system represented the 5 inch system scaled up to the largest barrel size practical, while still remaining portable. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Bull Canadian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Bull, Canada. More...

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