Encyclopedia Astronautica
Jason



wjason.jpg
Jason
French earth sea satellite. 2 launches, 2001.12.07 (Jason 1) and 2008.06.20 (Jason 2). Jason was a joint mission between CNES (the French space agency) and NASA/JPL, carrying the same type of sea surface altimeter used on NASA's Topex satellite.

The Poseidon-2 altimeter, the mission's main instrument measured range from the satellite to the ocean below. The JMR radiometer measured perturbations to this measurement due to atmospheric water vapor; and three location systems: Doris (Doppler), LRA (laser) and TRSR (GPS), provided extremely precise and redundant location information for the satellite itself.. These instruments provided full redundancy and measurements for at least three years.

In 1996 CNES (the French space agency) began development of the Proteus mini-satellite bus (Plateforme Reconfigurable pour l'Observation, les TÚlÚcommunications et les Usages scientifiques). The bus was designed to support payloads for 500 to 700 kg class observation, telecommunications, or scientific satellites for a nominal three-year service life. The main objective was to reduce the cost of the access to space. Aerospatiale Alcatel Cannes was selected as the contractor for the bus and the associated command control ground segment. Jason was the first use of this bus.

Gross mass: 485 kg (1,069 lb).
First Launch: 2001.12.07.
Last Launch: 2008.06.20.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Delta The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Development began in 1955 and it continued in service in the 21st Century despite numerous candidate replacements. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Delta American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Delta began as Thor, a crash December 1955 program to produce an intermediate range ballistic missile using existing components, which flew thirteen months after go-ahead. Fifteen months after that, a space launch version flew, using an existing upper stage. The addition of solid rocket boosters allowed the Thor core and Able/Delta upper stages to be stretched. Costs were kept down by using first and second-stage rocket engines surplus to the Apollo program in the 1970's. Continuous introduction of new 'existing' technology over the years resulted in an incredible evolution - the payload into a geosynchronous transfer orbit increasing from 68 kg in 1962 to 3810 kg by 2002. Delta survived innumerable attempts to kill the program and replace it with 'more rationale' alternatives. By 2008 nearly 1,000 boosters had flown over a fifty-year career, and cancellation was again announced. More...
  • Delta 7920-X Three stage vehicle consisting of 9 x GEM-40 + 1 x EELT Thor/RS-27A + 1 x Delta K with 3.05 m (10 foot) diameter fairing More...
  • Delta 7320-10 American orbital launch vehicle. Three stage vehicle consisting of 3 x GEM-40 + 1 x EELT Thor/RS-27A + 1 x Delta K More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • National Space Science Center Planetary Page, As of 19 February 1999.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, Jason-1 Launch Press Kit, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, Jason-1 Factsheet, Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Vandenberg Vandenberg Air Force Base is located on the Central Coast of California about 240 km northwest of Los Angeles. It is used for launches of unmanned government and commercial satellites into polar orbit and intercontinental ballistic missile test launches toward the Kwajalein Atoll. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC2W Delta launch complex. Originally a Thor 75 SMS launch pad. Upgraded to a space launch complex in 1966. More...

Jason Chronology


2001 December 7 - . 15:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7920-X. LV Configuration: Delta 7920-10 D289.
  • Jason 1 - . Payload: TPFO. Mass: 485 kg (1,069 lb). Nation: France. Agency: CNES; NASA. Manufacturer: Cannes. Class: Earth. Type: Ionosphere satellite. Spacecraft: Jason. USAF Sat Cat: 26997 . COSPAR: 2001-055A. Apogee: 1,344 km (835 mi). Perigee: 1,332 km (827 mi). Inclination: 66.1000 deg. Period: 112.40 min. Oceanography satellite, launch delayed from August 10 and September 15. Jason 1 was a joint mission between CNES (the French space agency) and NASA/JPL, following on the Topex satellite which carried the Poseidon sea surface altimeter. Jason carried Poseidon 2, as well as orbital tracking experiments and a microwave radiometer which measured the amount of water vapor, allowing path delay errors to be calibrated. The satellite used the Alcatel Proteus bus and had a dry mass of 472 kg plus 28 kg of hydrazine propellant. The JASON/TIMED mission's Boeing Delta 7920-10C second stage reached an initial orbit of 215 x 1343 km x 66.2 deg at 1517 GMT. A second burn at 1559 GMT circularized at apogee to 1320 x 1330 km x 66.0 deg, and the Jason 1 satellite was ejected at 1602 GMT.

2008 June 20 - . 07:46 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7320-10. LV Configuration: Delta 7320-10 s/n D334.
  • Jason 2 - . Mass: 506 kg (1,115 lb). Nation: France. Agency: Martin. Class: Earth. Type: Earth resources satellite. Spacecraft: Jason. USAF Sat Cat: 33105 . COSPAR: 2008-032A. Apogee: 1,344 km (835 mi). Perigee: 1,332 km (827 mi). Inclination: 66.0000 deg. Period: 112.40 min.

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