Encyclopedia Astronautica
Kompas


Russian earth seismology satellite. 2 launches, 2001.12.10 (Kompas) and 2006.05.26 (Kompas).

The Russian Kompas satellite, built by Makeyev for the IZMIRAN geophysics institute, was an 80 kg satellite with a magnetometer and other sensors designed to attempt prediction of earthquakes. The satellite was originally built for use on the Shtil rocket.

Gross mass: 80 kg (176 lb).
First Launch: 2001.12.10.
Last Launch: 2006.05.26.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • R-29 First intercontinental submarine-launched ballistic missile (range 7800 km). First flight 1969. Development completed 1973. The variants of this missile were given three different DoD designations over the years (SS-N-8, SS-N-18, and SS-N-23). More...
  • Zenit Zenit was to be a modular new generation medium Soviet launch vehicle, replacing the various ICBM-derived launch vehicles in use since the 1960's (Tsiklon and Soyuz). A version of the first stage was used as strap-ons for the cancelled Energia heavy booster. But it was built by Yuzhnoye in the Ukraine; when the Soviet Union broke up planned large-scale production for the Soviet military was abandoned (Angara development was begun as an indigenous alternative). Launch pads were completed only at Baikonur; those at Plesetsk were never finished and are planned to be completed as Angara pads. However the vehicle found new life as a commercial launch vehicle, launched from a sea platform by an American/Ukrainian consortium. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • R-29 Russian submarine-launched ballistic missile. First intercontinental submarine-launched ballistic missile (range 7800 km). First flight 1969. Development completed 1973. The variants of this missile were given three different DoD designations over the years (SS-N-8, SS-N-18, and SS-N-23). More...
  • Zenit-2 Ukrainian orbital launch vehicle. Two-stage version that continued to be used for launch of Russian military satellites tailored to it after the fall of the Soviet Union. More...
  • Zenit Zenit was to be a modular new generation medium Soviet launch vehicle, replacing the various ICBM-derived launch vehicles in use since the 1960's (Tsiklon and Soyuz). A version of the first stage was used as strap-ons for the cancelled Energia heavy booster. But it was built by Yuzhnoye in the Ukraine; when the Soviet Union broke up planned large-scale production for the Soviet military was abandoned (Angara development was begun as an indigenous alternative). Launch pads were completed only at Baikonur; those at Plesetsk were never finished and are planned to be completed as Angara pads. However the vehicle found new life as a commercial launch vehicle, launched from a sea platform by an American/Ukrainian consortium. More...
  • Shtil-1/1N Russian intercontinental ballistic orbital launch vehicle. Three stage vehicle based on R-29RM SLBM. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Makeyev Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Makeyev Design Bureau, Kolomna, Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • National Space Science Center Planetary Page, As of 19 February 1999.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...
  • Barents Sea Launch Area Submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area known to have been used for 119 launches from 1965 to 2007, reaching up to 1270 kilometers altitude. More...

Kompas Chronology


2001 December 10 - . 17:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC45/1. LV Family: Zenit. Launch Vehicle: Zenit-2. LV Configuration: Zenit-2 19L (1381573091).
  • Kompas - . Mass: 80 kg (176 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Makeyev. Class: Earth. Type: Seismology satellite. Spacecraft: Kompas. USAF Sat Cat: 27002 . COSPAR: 2001-056B. Apogee: 1,013 km (629 mi). Perigee: 985 km (612 mi). Inclination: 99.2000 deg. Period: 105.10 min. The Russian Kompas satellite, built by Makeyev for the IZMIRAN geophysics institute, was an 80 kg satellite with a magnetometer and other sensors designed to attempt prediction of earthquakes. The satellite was originally built for use on the Shtil rocket.

2006 May 26 - . 18:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Barents Sea Launch Area. Launch Pad: 69.5 N x 34.2 E. Launch Platform: K-84. LV Family: R-29. Launch Vehicle: Shtil-1/1N. LV Configuration: Shtil-1/1N s/n No2.
  • Kompass-2 - . Mass: 80 kg (176 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Izmiran. Manufacturer: Makeyev. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: Kompas. USAF Sat Cat: 29157 . COSPAR: 2006-019A. Apogee: 492 km (305 mi). Perigee: 402 km (249 mi). Inclination: 78.9000 deg. Period: 93.50 min. Complex Orbital Magneto-Plasma Autonomous Small Satellite. Earthquake research satellite for the Moscow-based IZMIRAN science institute. The satellite carried detectors for electrons, UHF/VHF waves, UV emission and radiation, a radio frequency analyser for electric field waves, and a Mayak ionospheric beacon. Reports indicated that the satellite did not respond to ground commands and that its mission was abandoned.

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