Encyclopedia Astronautica
KOMPSAT-2


South Korean civilian surveillance satellite. One launch, 2006.07.28, Kompsat 2.

The KOMPSAT-2 (Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite 2) was an indigenous Korean satellite designed to carry scientific instruments for observation of natural resources, digital map-making and atmospheric research, and high resolution imaging from a orbit of 685 km above the earth. The Korea Aerospace Research Institute contracted for launch of the satellite on a Chinese CZ-2C booster from Xichang in April 2004.

First Launch: 2006.07.28.
Number: 1 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
  • Korea South South Korea became familiar with large-scale rocketry through maintenance and modification activities on American-supplied Honest John and Nike Hercules tactical missiles. By the 1990's Korea had developed an independent capability to manufacture solid propellant rocket motors of up to one tonne mass. In 1990 KARI was funded to build the first indigenous sounding rockets, flown as the KSR-I and KSR-II. In December 1997 KARI was allowed to proceed with development of liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket motor for an orbital launcher, but this was abandoned when the South Korean government decided it wanted to be among the top ten spacefaring nations by 2015. The existing program was too limited in growth potential to allow that. Therefore it was decided to leapfrog the technology by contracting with Russian companies. First launch of the KSLV-I launch vehicle from the new space centre took place in 2010. More...

See also
  • UR-100N The UR-100N was designed as a replacement for the UR-100 at the end of its ten year storage life. Although it could be installed in the same silos, it was 50% heavier. The competing design of Yangel, the MR-UR-100, was also put into production when the Soviet hierarchy deadlocked and could not pick one design over the other. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • UR-100N Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100N was designed as a replacement for the UR-100 at the end of its ten year storage life. Although it could be installed in the same silos, it was 50% heavier. The competing design of Yangel, the MR-UR-100, was also put into production when the Soviet hierarchy deadlocked and could not pick one design over the other. More...
  • CZ-2C Chinese orbital launch vehicle. The CZ-2C was the definitive low earth orbit launch vehicle derived from DF-5 ICBM. It became the basis for an entire family of subsequent Long March vehicles. Many adaptive modifications were made to the configuration of the CZ-2A to handle a variety of new satellites and upper stages. The CZ-2C had improved technical performance and payload capacity compared to the CZ-2A, with later versions having a payload capability of 2,800 kg into a 200 km circular orbit. More...
  • Rokot Russian all-solid orbital launch vehicle, consisting of decommissioned UR-100N ICBMs with a Briz-KM upper stage. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • KARI South Korean agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Korea South. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Plesetsk Plesetsk was the Soviet Union's northern cosmodrome, used for polar orbit launches of mainly military satellites, and was at one time the busiest launch centre in the world. The collapse of the Soviet Union put the main launch site of Baikonur in Kazakh territory. It now seems that once the Proton rocket is retired, Baikonur will be abandoned and Plesetsk will be Russia's primary launch centre. Upgrades to existing launch facilities will allow advanced versions of the Soyuz rocket and the new Angara launch vehicle to be launched from Plesetsk. Plesetsk's major drawback was the lower net payload in geosynchronous orbit from a northern latitude launch site. However Russia is planning to remove the disadvantage by looping geosynchronous satellites around the moon, using lunar gravity to make the necessary orbital plane change. More...

KOMPSAT-2 Chronology


2006 July 28 - . 07:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC133/3. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: Rokot. LV Configuration: Rokot s/n 9.
  • Kompsat 2 - . Payload: Arirang-2. Mass: 798 kg (1,759 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Manufacturer: EADS Astrium. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: KOMPSAT-2. USAF Sat Cat: 29268 . COSPAR: 2006-031A. Apogee: 701 km (435 mi). Perigee: 676 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 98.50 min. Summary: Carried a 1-meter-resolution Earth surveillance camera...

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