Encyclopedia Astronautica
Meteor-3M



met3M2np.jpg
Meteor-3M
Credit: NPO PM
Russian earth weather satellite. One launch, 2001.12.10. The Meteor-3 weather satellite was to be followed in 1996 by the first of the Meteor-3M class, which was finally put into orbit in 2001. No further launches, and succeeded by the Meteor-M in 2010.

Use of the Zenit launch vehicle allowed the overall mass of the Meteor-3M spacecraft to be increased to 2,500 kg, including a larger payload of up to 900 kg. In addition, the average daily power available nearly doubled to 1 kW, and the spacecraft stabilization accuracy was improved by an order of magnitude. Pointing accuracy was improved. Satellite design lifetime increased to three years.

The store and forward transmission mode was converted from the earlier 466.5 MHz analogue to 1.69-1.71 GHz digital. The 1.4 diameter, 2.2 m long spacecraft bus carried a payload truss (as on Meteor 3) with dimensions 1.800 mm by 1.600 mm by 270 mm. High-temperature ammonia thrusters (0.147 N) were used for orbital adjustment of the basic 900 km 950 km orbit. Originally slated for a 900 km x 950 km orbit with an inclination of 82.5 degrees, Meteor 3M was instead inserted into a 1000 km altitude sun-synchronous orbit.

In 1994 NASA was negotiating with the Russian Space Agency to carry the SAGE III (Stratospheric and Aerosols and Gas Experiment) instrument on a 1998 Meteor. This did not fly until the first Meteor-3M flight in 2001.

AKA: 17F45M.
Gross mass: 2,500 kg (5,500 lb).
Height: 2.20 m (7.20 ft).
First Launch: 2001.12.10.
Number: 1 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Meteor Family of Polish sounding rockets developed by the Polish Aviation Institute for the Polish Hydro-Meteorological institute beginning in 1962. More...
  • Zenit Zenit was to be a modular new generation medium Soviet launch vehicle, replacing the various ICBM-derived launch vehicles in use since the 1960's (Tsiklon and Soyuz). A version of the first stage was used as strap-ons for the cancelled Energia heavy booster. But it was built by Yuzhnoye in the Ukraine; when the Soviet Union broke up planned large-scale production for the Soviet military was abandoned (Angara development was begun as an indigenous alternative). Launch pads were completed only at Baikonur; those at Plesetsk were never finished and are planned to be completed as Angara pads. However the vehicle found new life as a commercial launch vehicle, launched from a sea platform by an American/Ukrainian consortium. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Zenit Zenit was to be a modular new generation medium Soviet launch vehicle, replacing the various ICBM-derived launch vehicles in use since the 1960's (Tsiklon and Soyuz). A version of the first stage was used as strap-ons for the cancelled Energia heavy booster. But it was built by Yuzhnoye in the Ukraine; when the Soviet Union broke up planned large-scale production for the Soviet military was abandoned (Angara development was begun as an indigenous alternative). Launch pads were completed only at Baikonur; those at Plesetsk were never finished and are planned to be completed as Angara pads. However the vehicle found new life as a commercial launch vehicle, launched from a sea platform by an American/Ukrainian consortium. More...
  • Zenit-2 Ukrainian orbital launch vehicle. Two-stage version that continued to be used for launch of Russian military satellites tailored to it after the fall of the Soviet Union. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • VNIIEM Russian manufacturer of spacecraft. VNII Elektromekhaniki (Russian abbreviation for All-Union Scientific-Research Institute for Electro-Mechanics), Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Johnson, Nicholas L; and Rodvold, David M, Europe and Asia in Space 1993-1994, USAF Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 80907, 1995..
  • National Space Science Center Planetary Page, As of 19 February 1999.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Melnik, T G, Voenno-Kosmicheskiy Siliy, Nauka, Moscow, 1997..
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...

Meteor-3M Chronology


2001 December 10 - . 17:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC45/1. LV Family: Zenit. Launch Vehicle: Zenit-2. LV Configuration: Zenit-2 19L (1381573091).
  • Meteor-3M - . Payload: Meteor 3M-N1. Mass: 2,500 kg (5,500 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: VNIIEM. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: Meteor-3M. USAF Sat Cat: 27001 . COSPAR: 2001-056A. Apogee: 1,014 km (630 mi). Perigee: 994 km (617 mi). Inclination: 99.2000 deg. Period: 105.20 min. Meteorology satellite. Launch postponed from late 2000, then delayed from November 30. The Meteor-3M weather satellite carried visible and IR sensors as well as NASA's SAGE III instrument which studied aerosols and the ozone layer. This was the first launched of a modernised version of the spacecraft. Launch be Zenit launch vehicle from Baikonur rather than Tsyklon 3 from Plesetsk allowed the spacecraft to be 350 kg heavier, carrying additional sensors and various piggy-back payloads.

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