Encyclopedia Astronautica
MFS



belftaxi.gif
Bell Lunar Taxi
Credit: via Jean-Christophe Carbonel
American manned lunar flyer. Study 1965. Bell Aerosystems designed a Manned Flying System for Apollo as a tool for lunar surface exploration.

The Manned Flying System would be able to transport an astronaut and about 136 kg of equipment (or two astronauts) for distances up to 24 km from the original landing site.

Crew Size: 2.

AKA: Manned Flying System.
Payload: 136 kg (299 lb).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Lunar Flyers Lunar flyers would use rocket power to get crew or cargo quickly from one point on the lunar surface to another. The larger versions could act as rescue vehicles to get crew members to lunar orbit for pick-up and return to earth. Their horrendous fuel requirements meant that they were mainly considered for one-use rescue missions - for example to return a crew from a disabled lunar rover, beyond walking distance back to their lander. Some Apollo variants proposed using leftover propellant from the Lunar Module descent stage to fuel such flyers. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Bell American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. ARC Liquid Propellant Division, Niagara Falls, NY, USA. More...

Bibliography
  • Ertel , Ivan D; Morse , Mary Louise; et al, The Apollo Spacecraft Chronology Vol I - IV NASA SP-4009, NASA, 1966-1974. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, Apollo MFS Kinaesthetics, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA Report, Apollo MFS Cryoengine Variant, Web Address when accessed: here.

MFS Chronology


1965 July 21 - .
  • Apollo Manned Flying System - . Nation: USA. Program: Apollo. Spacecraft: MFS. Bell Aerosystems Company announced that it had received additional funds from NASA (almost a half million dollars) to continue work on another lunar vehicle, the so-called Manned Flying System. This latter craft, also primarily a tool for exploration, would be able to transport an astronaut and about 136 kg (300 lbs) of equipment (or two astronauts) for distances up to 24 km (15 mi) from the original landing site.

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use