Encyclopedia Astronautica
MicroSat-100



midisstl.jpg
SSTL Midisatellite
Credit: NASA
British microsatellite bus. 9 launches, 1995.07.07 (CERISE) to 2009.07.29. Enlarged version of the basic Surrey Microsat bus.

The MicroSat-100 enhanced microsatellite platform expanded the range of SSTL's modular microsatellite to missions of 70 to 130 kg total mass, with a typical payload mass of up to 40 kg.

Whilst building extensively on the MicroSat-70 heritage, the enhanced microsatellite provided substantially greater payload power and volume to match emerging customer requirements. It included orbit station-keeping for constellation applications, and an advanced attitude control system using reaction wheels and control moment gyros for agile and precise pointing. A typical configuration (as used on three Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellites) included 2 Gbytes of on-board storage and dual-redundant 8-Mbit/sec S-band downlinks.

The MicroSat-100 structure was based on the same modular principles as the MicroSat-70. The internal module stack was mounted on larger facets providing accommodation for additional avionics, propulsion and payload subsystems. The volume above the stack was available for payloads, and was generally configured as an Earth-facing aperture.

The MicroSat-100 was proven in orbit by the AlSAT-1 mission, and further units were launched in 2003. The MicroSat-100 provided a proven baseline for customization, or an exceedingly cost-effective off-the-shelf solution for LEO remote sensing missions.

Electric System: 0.11 average kW.

AKA: SSTL-100.
Gross mass: 130 kg (280 lb).
Payload: 40 kg (88 lb).
Diameter: 0.61 m (2.00 ft).
First Launch: 2002.11.28.
Last Launch: 2009.07.29.
Number: 9 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Atlas V The Atlas V launch vehicle system was a completely new design that succeeded the earlier Atlas series. Atlas V vehicles were based on the 3.8-m (12.5-ft) diameter Common Core Booster (CCB) powered by a single Russian RD-180 engine. These could be clustered together, and complemented by a Centaur upper stage, and up to five solid rocket boosters, to achieve a wide range of performance. More...
  • Kosmos 3 In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Kosmos 3 Russian orbital launch vehicle. In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...
  • Kosmos 11K65M Russian orbital launch vehicle. Definitive and prolific production version of satellite launcher based on Yangel R-14 IRBM. After further development at NPO Polyot (Omsk, Chief Designer A S Klinishkov), the modified Kosmos-3M added a restartable second stage with an orientation system. This booster was launched form two 'Cusovaya' launch complexes from 1967. The second stage used low thrust rockets using gas generator output to adjust the final velocity of the stage More...
  • Atlas V American orbital launch vehicle. The Atlas V launch vehicle system was a completely new design that succeeded the earlier Atlas series. Atlas V vehicles were based on the 3.8-m (12.5-ft) diameter Common Core Booster (CCB) powered by a single Russian RD-180 engine. These could be clustered together, and complemented by a Centaur upper stage, and up to five solid rocket boosters, to achieve a wide range of performance. More...
  • Atlas V 401 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V version with a 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and no strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 7,095 kg (15,642 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 4,950 kg (10,910 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • CNES French agency overseeing development of spacecraft. Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, Paris, France. More...
  • Surrey British manufacturer of spacecraft. Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd. , Guildford, UK More...
  • DGA French agency overseeing development of spacecraft. Delegation Generale de l'Armament, France. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Plesetsk Plesetsk was the Soviet Union's northern cosmodrome, used for polar orbit launches of mainly military satellites, and was at one time the busiest launch centre in the world. The collapse of the Soviet Union put the main launch site of Baikonur in Kazakh territory. It now seems that once the Proton rocket is retired, Baikonur will be abandoned and Plesetsk will be Russia's primary launch centre. Upgrades to existing launch facilities will allow advanced versions of the Soyuz rocket and the new Angara launch vehicle to be launched from Plesetsk. Plesetsk's major drawback was the lower net payload in geosynchronous orbit from a northern latitude launch site. However Russia is planning to remove the disadvantage by looping geosynchronous satellites around the moon, using lunar gravity to make the necessary orbital plane change. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC41 Titan, Atlas V launch complex. Complexes 40 and 41 were constructed as part of the Integrate-Transfer-Launch (ITL) Titan launch facility at the north end of Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s. Over the next three decades, the complexes supported a wide variety of military space missions involving Titan IIIC, Titan 34D and Titan IV. Complex 41 was deactivated at the end of 1977, then upgraded for the Titan IV program in the 1986-88 period. In October 1999, Complex 41 was demolished with high explosives in order for a new pad for launch of the Atlas 5 rocket to be erected. By then it had been the starting point for 27 Titan flights. More...

MicroSat-100 Chronology


2002 November 28 - . 06:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC132/1. LV Family: Kosmos 3. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K65M. LV Configuration: Kosmos 11K65M 53779-802.
  • ALSAT-1 - . Mass: 80 kg (176 lb). Nation: Algeria. Agency: NCST. Manufacturer: Surrey. Program: Alsat. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 27559 . COSPAR: 2002-054A. Apogee: 745 km (462 mi). Perigee: 681 km (423 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 99.00 min. Delayed from September 12, October 29. ALSAT 1 was an Algerian imaging minisatellite. The 90-kg satellite was the first part of an international Disaster Monitoring System (DMS) for alerting natural/man-made disasters. ALSAT was built by Surrey Satellite for the CNTS (Centre National des Techniques Spatiales) in Algiers. It carriee a 32-m resolution 3-band imager, a 100 mN resistojet thruster for small orbit corrections, and a GPS receiver. The SSTL Microsat-100 class satellite was a 0.60m cube with a 6m gravity gradient boom. As well as gravity gradient stabilization, it used a momentum wheel to improve stability for imaging.

2003 September 27 - . 06:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC132/1. LV Family: Kosmos 3. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K65M. LV Configuration: Kosmos 3M.
  • Bilsat 1 (BiltenSat, Tubitak 1, DMC-Turkey) - . Mass: 100 kg (220 lb). Nation: Turkey. Agency: Tubitak-Bilten. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Earth. Type: Disaster monitoring satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 27940 . COSPAR: 2003-042B. Apogee: 695 km (431 mi). Perigee: 677 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.50 min. Three disaster monitoring DMC satellites (BILSAT-1, NigeriaSat-1 and UK-DMC) were lofted in a single Kosmos launch. They joined the first DMC satellite, AlSAT-1, which was launched into a 686 km sun-synchronous low Earth orbit in November 2002, to provide a worldwide daily imaging capability. The spacecraft were 3-axis stabilised nadir-pointing. The imaging payload was a 32-metre resolution GSD multispectral wide-swath Earth imaging cameras and a12-metre GSD panchromatic camera. The Kosmos rocket delivered the satellites into orbit with a precision about an order of magnitude better than the maximum allowable - placing the satellites into orbit with a semi-major axis accurate to within 700 metres and just 300 metres from that of AlSAT-1. Bilsat 1 was built for TUBITAK-ODTU-BILTEN, the Information Technology and Electronics Research Institute of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey
  • BNSCSat 1 (DMC-UK) - . Mass: 80 kg (176 lb). Nation: UK. Agency: BNSC. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Earth. Type: Disaster monitoring satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 27941 . COSPAR: 2003-042C. Apogee: 694 km (431 mi). Perigee: 677 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.50 min.
  • NigeriaSat 1 (DMC-Nigeria) - . Mass: 80 kg (176 lb). Nation: Nigeria. Agency: NSRDA. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Earth. Type: Disaster monitoring satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 27942 . COSPAR: 2003-042D. Apogee: 694 km (431 mi). Perigee: 677 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.50 min.

2005 October 27 - . 06:52 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC132/1. LV Family: Kosmos 3. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K65M. LV Configuration: Kosmos 11K65M 104.
  • Topsat - . Payload: Heavily modified Surrey MicroSat-100. Mass: 108 kg (238 lb). Nation: UK. Agency: Qinetiq. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 28891 . COSPAR: 2005-043B. Apogee: 707 km (439 mi). Perigee: 682 km (423 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.70 min. Summary: Delayed from May 18, mid-July, August 25, September 27 and 30, 2005. UK military surveillance research satellite..
  • Beijing-1 - . Payload: Tsinghua 2, China-DMC+4, Modified MicroSat-100. Mass: 140 kg (300 lb). Nation: China. Agency: KVR. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Surveillance. Type: Civilian surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 28890 . COSPAR: 2005-043A. Apogee: 705 km (438 mi). Perigee: 682 km (423 mi). Inclination: 98.2000 deg. Period: 98.60 min. Beijing-1 carried a 31-cm focal-length cartographic telescope with a resolution of 4 meters. It was to be part of the international Disaster Monitoring Constellation. Operated by Tsinghua University for Beijing Landview Mapping Information Technology Ltd.

2007 March 9 - . 03:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V 401 AV-013.
  • CFESat - . Payload: Heavily modified Surrey MicroSat-100. Mass: 159 kg (350 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Los Alamos. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 30777 . COSPAR: 2007-006F. Apogee: 563 km (349 mi). Perigee: 558 km (346 mi). Inclination: 35.4000 deg. Period: 95.90 min. The Cibola Flight Experiment satellites carried eight new technologies for space flight validation, including a new power supply, inflatable antennas, deployable booms, a new type of launch-vehicle separation system, and a high-density pack of AA lithium-ion batteries. Cibola's on-board field programmable gate array supercomputer processed data onboard, then beamed only the results rather than the raw data to the ground. The Cibola also had a science mission: the study of lightning, ionospheric disturbances, and other sources of radio frequency (RF) atmospheric noise.

2009 July 29 - . 18:46 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC109. LV Family: R-36M. Launch Vehicle: Dnepr.
  • Deimos 1 - . Mass: 90 kg (198 lb). Nation: Spain. Agency: Makeyev. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 35681 . COSPAR: 2009-041A. Apogee: 677 km (420 mi). Perigee: 635 km (394 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 97.80 min. Summary: Deimos Space SL, Madrid, Spain..
  • DMC 2 - . Mass: 95 kg (209 lb). Nation: UK. Agency: Makeyev. Spacecraft: MicroSat-100. USAF Sat Cat: 35683 . COSPAR: 2009-041C. Apogee: 677 km (420 mi). Perigee: 625 km (388 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 97.80 min. Summary: DMC International Imaging, Guildford, Surrey, UK..

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