Encyclopedia Astronautica
MOBEV F2E



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MOBEV F2E
American manned lunar flyer. Study 1966. The MOBEV selected return to orbit vehicle, F2E, was provided with six degree of freedom control for rendezvous as well as normal attitude control. Maximum operational mass with 2 astronauts and payload, 1364.5 kg.

Four main lift engines were used for boost and midcourse corrections and positive explusion tanks were provided. Line of sight communications with the orbiting CSM were provided by the PLSS VHF system with the addition of an amplifier to increase the range. The navigation and guidance system was the same as the surface-to-surface vehicle with the addition of a rendezvous transponder. The F2E had a fueled mass of 1106 kg, and would cost $ 33.0 million and 42 months to develop. A three-man version, designated F3E, would have a mass of 1476 kg and take $34.8 million/42 months to develop.

LFV Concepts Summary

Pogo Single-Crew Surface to Surface

                        F1A  F1B   F1C
Fueled Mass(kg)         64    82   310
Range(km)                8    20   170
Crew Size                1     1     1
Development Cost($M)  10.6  11.1  13.4
Development Time(Mos)   24    24    24

Multiman Surface to Surface
                        F2A  F2B  F2C  F2D    F3A   F3B   F3C  F3D
Fueled Mass(kg)         288  392  530  788    529  1074  2066 4209
Range(km)                20   50  100  200     50  200   400   800
Crew Size                 2    2    2    2      3    3     3     3
Development Cost($M)   29.1 29.5 30.1 30.9   30.8 32.7  36.8  44.5
Development Time(Mos)    42   42   42   42     42   42    42    42

Surface to Lunar Orbit
                         F2E   F3E 
Fueled Mass(kg)         1106  1476
Crew Size                  2     3
Development Cost($M)    33.0  34.8
Development Time(Mos)     42    42

Crew Size: 2.

Gross mass: 1,107 kg (2,440 lb).
Unfuelled mass: 339 kg (747 lb).
Specific impulse: 290 s.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Lunar Flyers Lunar flyers would use rocket power to get crew or cargo quickly from one point on the lunar surface to another. The larger versions could act as rescue vehicles to get crew members to lunar orbit for pick-up and return to earth. Their horrendous fuel requirements meant that they were mainly considered for one-use rescue missions - for example to return a crew from a disabled lunar rover, beyond walking distance back to their lander. Some Apollo variants proposed using leftover propellant from the Lunar Module descent stage to fuel such flyers. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • NASA American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA, USA. More...
  • Bendix American manufacturer of rockets and spacecraft. Bendix, USA. More...

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