Encyclopedia Astronautica
MuSat


Argentinan earth magnetosphere satellite. One launch, 1996.08.29, Microsat. MuSat-1 Victor was the first Argentine-built satellite.

Measuring 340 x 340 x 450mm."Victor " was an experimental vehicle, intended to evaluate in-orbit behaviour of low-cost space technologies. It carried two video cameras, oriented for earth-imaging, as well as transceivers in both UHF and S bands. The beacon could be heard every 90 seconds at 137.95 MHz as a brief burst of CW ("Hi hi de MUSAT"). Electrical power was provided by four 88-Si cells solar panels, with an end-of-life electrical power of 8 W. Its position was determined by means of a 3-axis, flux-gate magnetometer, as well as both solar and horizon sensors, while its attitude was 3-axis controlled by magnetic coils and reaction wheels, with a pointing precision of 0.5 deg. MuSat-1 was developed and built by a 25-person team at the Instituto Universitario Aeronautico, under the sponsorship of the government of the province of Cordoba, in a 3.5 year, $1.2 million effort.

Gross mass: 32 kg (70 lb).
First Launch: 1996.08.29.
Number: 1 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
  • Argentina The Argentine Interplanetary Society was organized in the 1940's. In 1952 Argentina was one of the founding members of the International Astronautical Federation. From 1960 the Comision Nacional de Investigaciones Espaciales (CNIE) worked with the Argentine Air Force's Instituto de Investigaciones Aeronauticas y Espaciales (IIAE) to develop indigenous sounding rockets and missiles. Argentina was the first country in Latin America to send an object into space using an indigenously-developed rocket. In the 1980's Argentina took part in a multinational effort to develop the Condor intermediate range missile. Under American pressure, the Condor Program was canceled in 1991, the IIAE and CNIE were dismantled, and further work on launch vehicles was banned. A new civilian space agency, CONAE was created, which concentrated on development of surveillance satellites for earth resource and environmental monitoring. More...

See also
  • Soyuz The Russian Soyuz spacecraft has been the longest-lived, most adaptable, and most successful manned spacecraft design. In production for fifty years, more than 240 have been built and flown on a wide range of missions. The design will remain in use with the international space station well into the 21st century, providing the only manned access to the station after the retirement of the shuttle in 2011. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Soyuz Russian orbital launch vehicle. The world's first ICBM became the most often used and most reliable launch vehicle in history. The original core+four strap-on booster missile had a small third stage added to produce the Vostok launch vehicle, with a payload of 5 metric tons. Addition of a larger third stage produced the Voskhod/Soyuz vehicle, with a payload over 6 metric tons. Using this with a fourth stage, the resulting Molniya booster placed communications satellites and early lunar and planetary probes in higher energy trajectories. By the year 2000 over 1,628 had been launched with an unmatched success rate of 97.5% for production models. Improved models providing commercial launch services for international customers entered service in the new millenium, and a new launch pad at Kourou was to be inaugurated in 2009. It appeared that the R-7 could easily still be in service 70 years after its first launch. More...
  • Molniya 8K78M Russian orbital launch vehicle. Improved Molniya, in variants with Blocks ML, 2BL, or SO-L third stages according to payload. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Cordoba Argentinan manufacturer of spacecraft. Instituto Universitario Aeronautico de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Plesetsk Plesetsk was the Soviet Union's northern cosmodrome, used for polar orbit launches of mainly military satellites, and was at one time the busiest launch centre in the world. The collapse of the Soviet Union put the main launch site of Baikonur in Kazakh territory. It now seems that once the Proton rocket is retired, Baikonur will be abandoned and Plesetsk will be Russia's primary launch centre. Upgrades to existing launch facilities will allow advanced versions of the Soyuz rocket and the new Angara launch vehicle to be launched from Plesetsk. Plesetsk's major drawback was the lower net payload in geosynchronous orbit from a northern latitude launch site. However Russia is planning to remove the disadvantage by looping geosynchronous satellites around the moon, using lunar gravity to make the necessary orbital plane change. More...

MuSat Chronology


1996 August 29 - . 05:22 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC43/3. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78M. LV Configuration: Molniya 8K78M-2BL.
  • Microsat - . Payload: Victor. Mass: 32 kg (70 lb). Nation: Argentina. Agency: Cordoba. Class: Earth. Type: Magnetosphere satellite. Spacecraft: MuSat. Decay Date: 1999-11-12 . USAF Sat Cat: 24291 . COSPAR: 1996-050A. Apogee: 19,176 km (11,915 mi). Perigee: 804 km (499 mi). Inclination: 62.8000 deg. Period: 94.70 min. MuSat-1 Victor separated from the launch vehicle at 05:31 GMT, becoming the first Argentine-built satellite. Measuring 340 x 340 x 450mm."Victor " was an experimental vehicle, intended to evaluate in-orbit behaviour of low-cost space technologies. It carried two video cameras, oriented for earth-imaging, as well as transceivers in both UHF and S bands. The beacon could be heard every 90 seconds at 137.95 MHz as a brief burst of CW ("Hi hi de MUSAT"). Electrical power was provided by four 88-Si cells solar panels, with an end-of-life electrical power of 8 W. Its position was determined by means of a 3-axis, flux-gate magnetometer, as well as both solar and horizon sensors, while its attitude was 3-axis controlled by magnetic coils and reaction wheels, with a pointing precision of 0.5 deg. MuSat-1 was developed and built by a 25-person team at the Instituto Universitario Aeronautico, under the sponsorship of the government of the province of Cordoba, in a 3.5 year, $1.2 million effort.

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