Encyclopedia Astronautica
OS


Russian manned space station. Study 1960. In 1960 Korolev proposed a military orbital station (OS), with a crew of 3 to 5, orbiting at 350 to 400 km altitude.

The station would conduct military reconnaissance, control other spacecraft in orbit, and undertake basic space research. This initial OS grew into the much larger TKS concept of 1961.

On 23 June 1960 Korolev wrote to the Ministry of Defense, again trying to obtain support for a military orbital station (OS), on which a decision had been deferred to the end of the year. The N-I version of the station would have a mass of 25 to 30 metric tons and the N-II version 60 to 70 metric tons. Korolev pointed out that his design bureau had already completed a draft project, in which 14 work brigades had participated. Missions the station could accomplish included:

  • Reconnaissance
  • Combat operations against enemy spacecraft
  • Strike against any point on earth
  • Communications and relay functions
  • Military applications studies
  • Defense against enemy ballistic missiles
  • Study of the space environment
  • Study of the earth and planets
  • Astronomical observations
  • Weather observation
  • Interorbital communications
  • Study of the sun
  • Biological research
  • Radiation control studies

Korolev would not obtain a positive response to this proposal. As the N1 launch vehicle design grew, this initial OS grew into the much larger TKS of 1961.

Characteristics

Crew Size: 5.

Gross mass: 30,000 kg (66,000 lb).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • N1 1969 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. The N1 launch vehicle, developed by Russia in the 1960's, was to be the Soviet Union's counterpart to the Saturn V. The largest of a family of launch vehicles that were to replace the ICBM-derived launchers then in use, the N series was to launch Soviet cosmonauts to the moon, Mars, and huge space stations into orbit. In comparison to Saturn, the project was started late, starved of funds and priority, and dogged by political and technical struggles between the chief designers Korolev, Glushko, and Chelomei. The end result was four launch failures and cancellation of the project five years after Apollo landed on the moon. Not only did a Soviet cosmonaut never land on the moon, but the Soviet Union even denied that the huge project ever existed. More...
  • N1 The N1 launch vehicle, developed by Russia in the 1960's, was to be the Soviet Union's counterpart to the Saturn V. The largest of a family of launch vehicles that were to replace the ICBM-derived launchers then in use, the N series was to launch Soviet cosmonauts to the moon, Mars, and huge space stations into orbit. In comparison to Saturn, the project was started late, starved of funds and priority, and dogged by political and technical struggles between the chief designers Korolev, Glushko, and Chelomei. The end result was four launch failures and cancellation of the project five years after Apollo landed on the moon. Not only did a Soviet cosmonaut never land on the moon, but the Soviet Union even denied that the huge project ever existed. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Korolev Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Korolev Design Bureau, Kaliningrad, Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • Vetrov, G S, S. P. Korolev i evo delo, Nauka, Moscow, 1998.

OS Chronology


1960 June 23 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1.
  • Korolev tries to obtain support for a military orbital station - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Korolev. Spacecraft: OS. Korolev wrote to the Ministry of Defence, trying to obtain support for a military orbital station (OS). The station would have a crew of 3 to 5, orbited at 350 to 400 km altitude. The station would conduct military reconnaissance, control other spacecraft in orbit, and undertake basic space research. The N-I version of the station would have a mass of 25 to 30 tonnes and the N-II version 60 to 70 tonnes. Korolev pointed out that his design bureau had already completed a draft project, in which 14 work brigades had participated.

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