Encyclopedia Astronautica
OS-1 (1965)



os1b.gif
OS-1 Space Station
Credit: © Mark Wade
Russian manned space station. Reached mock-up stage, 1965.

Following a meeting between Khrushchev and chief designers at Pitsunda, Khrushchev ordered the start of a project to put a 75 metric ton manned platform with nuclear weapons into low earth orbit (dubbed elsewhere as 'Battlestar Khrushchev'). Korolev was authorized to proceed immediately to upgrade the three stage N vehicle to a maximum 75 metric ton payload in order to launch the station. Work on the OS-1 began on 25 September 1962. By 1965 the mockup of the huge station had been completed.

This drawing shows the original OS-1 configuration according to the studies of American analyst Charles Vick.

Characteristics

Crew Size: 6. Habitable Volume: 510.00 m3.

Gross mass: 75,000 kg (165,000 lb).
Height: 25.00 m (82.00 ft).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • N1 1969 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. The N1 launch vehicle, developed by Russia in the 1960's, was to be the Soviet Union's counterpart to the Saturn V. The largest of a family of launch vehicles that were to replace the ICBM-derived launchers then in use, the N series was to launch Soviet cosmonauts to the moon, Mars, and huge space stations into orbit. In comparison to Saturn, the project was started late, starved of funds and priority, and dogged by political and technical struggles between the chief designers Korolev, Glushko, and Chelomei. The end result was four launch failures and cancellation of the project five years after Apollo landed on the moon. Not only did a Soviet cosmonaut never land on the moon, but the Soviet Union even denied that the huge project ever existed. More...
  • N1 The N1 launch vehicle, developed by Russia in the 1960's, was to be the Soviet Union's counterpart to the Saturn V. The largest of a family of launch vehicles that were to replace the ICBM-derived launchers then in use, the N series was to launch Soviet cosmonauts to the moon, Mars, and huge space stations into orbit. In comparison to Saturn, the project was started late, starved of funds and priority, and dogged by political and technical struggles between the chief designers Korolev, Glushko, and Chelomei. The end result was four launch failures and cancellation of the project five years after Apollo landed on the moon. Not only did a Soviet cosmonaut never land on the moon, but the Soviet Union even denied that the huge project ever existed. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Korolev Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Korolev Design Bureau, Kaliningrad, Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • Vick, Charles, "Soviet Orbital Station-1 Designed in 1965", Spaceflight, 1994, Volume 36, page 282.
  • Semenov, Yu. P., S P Korolev Space Corporation Energia, RKK Energia, 1994.
  • Kamanin, N P, Skritiy kosmos, Infortext, Moscow, 1995.

OS-1 (1965) Chronology


1962 September 25 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1.
  • N1 launch vehicle upgraded to accomodate OS-1 75 tonne manned platform with nuclear weapons. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Korolev; Khrushchev. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: OS-1 (1965). Work on the OS-1 began following a meeting between Khrushchev and chief designers at Pitsunda. Korolev was authorized to proceed immediately to upgrade the three stage N vehicle to a maximum 75 tonne payload in order to launch the station. By 1965 the mockup of the huge station had been completed.

1963 April 28 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1 1964.
  • N1 Plans - . Nation: USSR. Spacecraft: TMK-1; L3-1963; OS-1 (1965). An Inter-Institution Soviet considers Korolev's N1 plans. He believes the first booster will be launched in 1965. The N1 is to have a payload capability of 75 tonnes to a 250 km altitude orbit, 50 tonnes to a 3000 km altitude orbit, and 16 tonnes in geostationary orbit. It could launch spacecraft capable of landing men on the moon and returning them to earth, or manned flybys of Mars or Venus. Three to ten launches would be needed for such missions, with the components being docked together in low earth orbit. The N1 can also be used to launch a large space station for military research. After the N1 discussion a decision is made that cosmonauts will not have to spend more than three to four days in a spacecraft mock-up on the ground to prove their readiness for flight. A simulation of the entire flight duration is not necessary.

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