Encyclopedia Astronautica
Progress M1



proissm1.jpg
Progress M1 / ISS
Credit: NASA
Russian logistics spacecraft. 11 launches, 2000.02.01 (Progress M1-1) to 2004.01.29 (Progress M1-11). Progress M1 was a modified version of the Progress M resupply spacecraft capable of delivering more propellant than the basic model to the ISS or Mir.

A Russian funded component of the ISS program, the Progress M1 could carry a maximum total of 2230 kg of cargo, of which a maximum of 1950 kg could be propellant and a maximum of 1800 kg in equipment or supplies.

From 2008 Progress M's flew with the new new TsVM-101 computer in place of the old Argon-16 (introduced on Progress-T in the 1970's) The TsVM-101 was much more capable, much smaller, and 9 times lighter (8.3 kg vs. 70 kg). In connection with this the analogue telemetry system was replaced by a smaller digital system. This modifications was originally planned in the late 1990's, but shelved for financial reasons. However the NII Argon design bureau discontinued production of the old computer, forcing RKK Energia to fund development of the TsVM-101 at NII Submikron in Tselenograd. Progress-M's equipped with the new computers received the new article number 11F615A70 with a new serial number series beginning with 501. The computers were installed in the service module.

Gross mass: 7,150 kg (15,760 lb).
Payload: 2,230 kg (4,910 lb).
First Launch: 2000.02.01.
Last Launch: 2004.01.29.
Number: 11 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Soyuz The Russian Soyuz spacecraft has been the longest-lived, most adaptable, and most successful manned spacecraft design. In production for fifty years, more than 240 have been built and flown on a wide range of missions. The design will remain in use with the international space station well into the 21st century, providing the only manned access to the station after the retirement of the shuttle in 2011. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Soyuz Russian orbital launch vehicle. The world's first ICBM became the most often used and most reliable launch vehicle in history. The original core+four strap-on booster missile had a small third stage added to produce the Vostok launch vehicle, with a payload of 5 metric tons. Addition of a larger third stage produced the Voskhod/Soyuz vehicle, with a payload over 6 metric tons. Using this with a fourth stage, the resulting Molniya booster placed communications satellites and early lunar and planetary probes in higher energy trajectories. By the year 2000 over 1,628 had been launched with an unmatched success rate of 97.5% for production models. Improved models providing commercial launch services for international customers entered service in the new millenium, and a new launch pad at Kourou was to be inaugurated in 2009. It appeared that the R-7 could easily still be in service 70 years after its first launch. More...
  • Soyuz 11A511U Russian standardised man-rated orbital launch vehicle derived from the original R-7 ICBM of 1957. It has been launched in greater numbers than any orbital launch vehicle in history. Not coincidentally, it has been the most reliable as well. After over 40 years service in Russia, ESA built a new launch pad at Kourou which will keep it in service from three launch sites in three countries well into the mid-21st Century. More...
  • Soyuz FG Uprated Soyuz booster designed for high performance Russian government missions and delivery of Soyuz and Progress spacecraft to the International Space Station. Upgraded engines, modern avionics, reduced non-Russian content. Unknown differences to Soyuz ST. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Korolev Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Korolev Design Bureau, Kaliningrad, Russia. More...
  • RAKA Russian agency overseeing development of spacecraft. Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos), Moscow, Russia. More...

Associated Programs
  • ISS Finally completed in 2010 after a torturous 25-year development and production process, the International Space Station was originally conceived as the staging post for manned exploration of the solar systrem. Instead, it was seemed to be the death knell of manned spaceflight. More...
  • Mir The Mir space station was the last remnant of the once mighty Soviet space programme. It was built to last only five years, and was to have been composed of modules launched by Proton and Buran/Energia launch vehicles. These modules were derived from those originally designed by Chelomei in the 1960's for the Almaz military station programme. As the Soviet Union collapsed Mir stayed in orbit, but the final modules were years late and could only be completed with American financial assistance. Kept flying over a decade beyond its rated life, Mir proved a source of pride to the Russian people and proved the ability of their cosmonauts and engineers to improvise and keep operations going despite all manner of challenges and mishaps. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • National Space Science Center Planetary Page, As of 19 February 1999.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...

Progress M1 Chronology


2000 February 1 - . 06:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U A15000-669.
  • Progress M1-1 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 250. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 85.53 days. Decay Date: 2000-04-27 . USAF Sat Cat: 26067 . COSPAR: 2000-005A. Apogee: 348 km (216 mi). Perigee: 342 km (212 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.44 min. Progress M1 was a modification of the Progress M for the International Space Station. The first such spacecraft was diverted to raise the orbit of Mir. It docked with the unoccupied Mir space station on February 3 at 0802:20 GMT. Burns of its motor to raise Mir's orbit began on February 5 and continued through February 9. Progress M1-1 undocked at 16:33 GMT on April 26 to clear the docking port for Progress M1-2. It was deorbited over the Pacific at 19:27 GMT the same day.

2000 April 25 - . 20:08 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U.
  • Progress M1-2 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 252. Mass: 7,280 kg (16,040 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-28. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 173.00 days. Decay Date: 2000-10-15 . USAF Sat Cat: 26301 . COSPAR: 2000-021A. Apogee: 380 km (230 mi). Perigee: 363 km (225 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.98 min. Summary: Progress M1-2 docked with the rear Kvant port of Mir at 2128 GMT on April 27. Mir's orbit was raised on April 29 in the first of a series of three burns by Progress M1-2. It later undocked and was deorbited over the Pacific on 15 October..

2000 August 6 - . 18:26 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U K15000-668.
  • Progress M1-3 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 251. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: STS-106. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 86.53 days. Decay Date: 2000-11-01 . USAF Sat Cat: 26461 . COSPAR: 2000-044A. Apogee: 362 km (224 mi). Perigee: 347 km (215 mi). Inclination: 51.5000 deg. Period: 91.63 min. Progress M1-3 automatically docked with the International Space Station on August 8 at 20:13 GMT at the rear Zvezda port. The supply ship began refuelling of the station a few days later. It remained attached for offloading of its dry cargo by the STS-106 crew. It later separated from Zvezda's rear port at 0405 GMT November 1 and was deorbited over the Pacific at 0705 GMT.

2000 November 16 - . 00:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U K15000-671.
  • Progress M1-4 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 253. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-1. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 84.58 days. Decay Date: 2001-02-08 . USAF Sat Cat: 26615 . COSPAR: 2000-073A. Apogee: 363 km (225 mi). Perigee: 350 km (210 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.70 min. Progress M1-4 was an unmanned resupply craft that rendezvoused with the International Space Station on November 18. After problems with the automatic system, ISS Expedition 1 crew member Gidzenko took over manual control with the remote TORU system at 0302 GMT. The first docking attempt was aborted when M1-4 was only 5 m from the station at 0309 GMT. On the second attempt docking was successfully achieved at 0348 GMT at Zarya's nadir port. The problem on the first attempt was icing of the TORU system TV camera on the Progress when the spacecraft was in shadow. Progress M1-4 undocked from ISS at 1623 GMT on December 1. Following the mission of STS-97 Progress M1-4 redocked to Zarya's nadir port on December 26 at 1054 GMT. The redocking tested a fix to the software that caused problems in the vehicle's first docking attempt on November 18. Yuri Gidzenko completed the docking manually using the remote control TORU system. Progress M1-4 undocked from Zarya's nadir port for the last time at 1126 GMT on February 8. It was deorbited over the Pacific and reentered at 1350 GMT the same day.

2001 January 24 - . 04:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U K15000-673.
  • Progress M1-5 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 254. Mass: 7,300 kg (16,000 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 58.00 days. Decay Date: 2001-03-23 . USAF Sat Cat: 26688 . COSPAR: 2001-003A. Apogee: 215 km (133 mi). Perigee: 151 km (93 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 88.20 min. Mir Deorbiting mission. Launch delayed from January 16 and 18. The Mir station had a power failure on January 18, delaying the launch of the Progress cargo ship that was to deorbit it for a few days. Nick-named "Hearse", it was to deliver the 130 tonne Mir station to its cremation over the southern Pacific. Six cosmonauts were on "Hot-Standby" to reach Mir in the event the automatic docking failed. Progress M1-5 carried 2677 kg of fuel. A special three-day fuel-economy approach was be used to keep as much fuel as possibile for the deorbit. Progress M1-5 docked with the +X Kvant port at 0533 GMT on January 27. It later undocked and was deorbited over the Pacific together with Mir on 23 March.

2001 May 20 - . 22:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz FG. LV Configuration: Soyuz-FG F15000-001?.
  • Progress M1-6 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 255. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-2. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 93.44 days. Decay Date: 2001-08-22 . USAF Sat Cat: 26773 . COSPAR: 2001-021A. Apogee: 402 km (249 mi). Perigee: 391 km (242 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.50 min. ISS Servicing flight. Launch delayed from april 12. This Progress resupply mission to the ISS was launched by the first Soyuz-FG rocket - a modified Soyuz-U with 5 percent improved perfomance using new fuel utilisation systems. Progress M1-6 after launch was also designated as ISS supply mission 4P. It carried 2.5 tonnes of food, fuel, water, life-support material, and equipment, including spare computer equipment for the ISS Destiny module. Nearly one tonne of the fuel was for raising the altitude of the ISS. Progress M1-6 docked with Zvezda's aft (-Y) port at 0024 GMT on May 23. It undocked at 0601 GMT on August 22 and deorbited at around 0900 GMT the same day.

2001 November 26 - . 18:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz FG. LV Configuration: Soyuz-FG F15000-002 / ISS-6P.
  • Progress M1-7 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 256. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-3. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 113.29 days. Decay Date: 2002-03-20 . USAF Sat Cat: 26983 . COSPAR: 2001-051A. Apogee: 392 km (243 mi). Perigee: 384 km (238 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.30 min. ISS Servicing flight. Launch delayed from November 14. The Progress M1-7 Russian automatic cargo carrier soft docked with the International Space Station Zvezda module at 1943 GMT on Nov 28. The docking probe retracted, but the eight peripheral latches would not engage. It turned out that a rubber seal had been left on the docking ring by Progress M-45. Cosmonauts from aboard the station cleared the debris in a spacewalk on December 3. As they watched from a few meters away Progress M1-7 was commanded to a hard dock with the station. NASA referred to this flight as `Progress 6'. It delivered 2.5 tonnes of food, fuel and equipment to the station, as well as a microsatellite named Kolibri. The Expedition 4 crew finished loading trash into Progress M1-7 on 19 March 2002, and it undocked from Zvezda's aft port at 1743 UTC. The Kolibri-2000 microsatellite was ejected from the Progress cargo compartment at 2228 UTC; Progress fired its engines to deorbit over the Pacific at about 0127 UTC on Mar 20.

2002 March 21 - . 20:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U 678 / ISS-7P.
  • Progress M1-8 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 257. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-4. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 95.67 days. Decay Date: 2002-06-25 . USAF Sat Cat: 27395 . COSPAR: 2002-013A. Apogee: 398 km (247 mi). Perigee: 379 km (235 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.30 min. ISS Servicing mission. Launch delayed from February 15 and 28. The Progress M1-8 resupply spacecraft was flown on ISS mission 7P. It docked with the Zvezda module on the Station at 2058 UTC on March 24. Progress M1-8 undocked from the Zvezda module at 0826 UTC on June 25. The deorbit burn was at 1135 UTC, lowering its orbit from 379 x 398 km x 51.6 deg to 50 x 398 km. The spacecraft reentered over the Pacific at 1213 UTC with debris impact near 46 S 144 W.

2002 September 25 - . 16:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz FG. LV Configuration: Soyuz-FG E15000-003.
  • Progress M1-9 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 258. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-5. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 129.00 days. Decay Date: 2003-02-01 . USAF Sat Cat: 27531 . COSPAR: 2002-045A. Apogee: 324 km (201 mi). Perigee: 282 km (175 mi). Inclination: 51.6331 deg. Period: 90.60 min. Launch delayed from July 22, September 10 and 20. Progress-M1 9, known to NASA as Progress 9P, was a Russian automatic cargo transportation craft that was to deliver food, fuel, and supplies to the International Space Station (ISS). It docked with the Zvezda module of the ISS on September 29 at 1700 UTC. Prior to the docking, the port was vacated by the earlier Progress-M 46. Undocked from the station on 1 February 2003 and commanded to destructive re-entry in the atmosphere.

2003 June 8 - . 10:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz-U D15000-681.
  • Progress M1-10 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 259. Mass: 7,270 kg (16,020 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-7. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 117.06 days. Decay Date: 2003-10-03 . USAF Sat Cat: 27823 . COSPAR: 2003-025A. Apogee: 341 km (211 mi). Perigee: 247 km (153 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 90.40 min. Resupply of International Space Station. Additional water carried to meet needs of skeleton crew. Successfully docked with the nadir port on Pirs at 1115 GMT on June 11. It undocked from the station on September 4 to clear the port for Soyuz TMA-3 but then unusually spent a month on an autonomous earth observation mission. The deorbit engine ignited at 11:26 GMT on October 3 from a 247 x 340 km x 51.6 deg orbit, reducing the perigee to 69 km. Progress M1-10 reentered the atmosphere over the Pacific at 11:58 GMT and broke up around 12:05 GMT.

2004 January 29 - . 11:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz-U D15000-683.
  • Progress M1-11 - . Payload: Progress M1 s/n 260. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: ISS EO-8. Spacecraft: Progress M1. Duration: 116.00 days. Decay Date: 2004-06-03 . USAF Sat Cat: 28142 . COSPAR: 2004-002A. Apogee: 263 km (163 mi). Perigee: 192 km (119 mi). Inclination: 51.6500 deg. Period: 88.73 min. ISS resupply, to dock at the Zvezda module of the station 13:15 GMT on 31 January. Launch delayed from November 20, 2003. Payload delivered amounted to 2345 kg and included a new flex hose for the Destiny module's leaky window, replacement parts for the Russian Elektron oxygen-generating unit, a spare Elektron, new Russian Solid Fuel Oxygen Generator candles, batteries for the Zarya and Zvezda modules, gas analyser equipment, updated fire suppression and detection equipment, a new Russian Orlan spacesuit, film, cameras, data cassettes and the Matreshka experiment package for installation on Zvezda's exterior during a spacewalk.

    A few days prior to its departure from the ISS, ground controllers fired the Progress M1-11's engines for 11 minutes, boosting the Station's altitude by 3.7 km and adjusting its inclination by one one-hundredth of a degree. Progress M1-11 undocked from the Station at 11:19 GMT on 24 May 2005, clearing the way for the arrival of Progress M-49. It was thereafter commanded to a destructive re-entry over the Pacific Ocean.


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