Encyclopedia Astronautica
Robotic Satellite Servicer



otvmm906.jpg
Space Tug - MM -1990
Robotic Satellite Servicer - Martin Marietta, 1990. NASA tried to integrate the OMV and Flight Telerobotic Servicer into a "Robotic Satellite Servicer." TRW and Martin Marietta were awarded $1.3-million phase B contracts in June 1990. The illustration depicts Martin's proposal.
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos
sstrw906.jpg
TRW RSS 1990
Robotic Satellite Servicer - TRW. TRW's Robotic Satellite Servicer (bottom) from 1990 would have consisted of an Orbital Manoeuvring Vehicle and a Flight Telerobotic Servicer. The OMV would have delivered the FTS to other spacecraft for refuelling or repair.
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos
American logistics spacecraft. Studied for ISS, but cancelled when the station's free-flying space platforms were deleted.

After the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle encountered developmental problems in 1989-90, NASA tried to integrate the OMV and Flight Telerobotic Servicer into a 'Robotic Satellite Servicer.' This in turn was cancelled when the station's free-flying space platforms were deleted.

The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle also encountered many problems in 1989-90 as the estimated total cost ballooned to $1 billion dollars -- an increase of $600 million. NASA then tried to integrate the OMV and Flight Telerobotic Servicer into a 'Robotic Satellite Servicer.' TRW and Martin Marietta were awarded $1.3-million phase B contracts in June 1990. However, neither project survived the Space Station redesign in late 1990; the cost was too high. The FTS was no longer necessary after the Space Station in-orbit assembly procedures were greatly simplified in 1990-91 while the OMV became less important after the Station's free-flying space platforms were cancelled.

Article by Marcus Lindroos

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • US Space Stations Wernher von Braun brought Noordung's rotating station design with him from Europe. This he popularized in the early 1950's in selling manned space flight to the American public. By the late 1950's von Braun's team favoured the spent-stage concept - which eventually flew as Skylab. By the mid-1960's, NASA was concentrating on modular, purpose-built, zero-G stations. These eventually flew as the International Space Station. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • NASA American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA, USA. More...
  • Martin American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956), Denver, CO, USA. More...
  • TRW American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. TRW Corporation, Redondo Beach, CA, USA. More...

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use