Encyclopedia Astronautica
SECOR



secor.jpg
SECOR
Credit: NASA
American earth geodetic satellite. 13 launches, 1962.01.24 (Secor) to 1969.04.14 (SECOR 13).

Geodetic SECOR (Sequential Collation of Range) was an all-weather geodetic survey system which was in operational use for over 3 years, establishing a global survey network. It used the successive positions of artificial satellites in space to determine locations on the earth's surface with exactness over long distances.

The spacecraft notably was used to precisely determine previously uncertain positions of islands in the Pacific. The system consisted of a satellite and 4 ground stations. 3 at geographical points where the co-ordinates had been surveyed accurately and the fourth at an unknown location. Radio waves were flashed from the ground stations to the satellite and returned. The position of the satellite at any time was fixed by the measured ranges from the 3 known stations. Using these precisely established satellite positions as a base, ranges from the satellite to the unknown station were used to compute the position of the unknown station. Geodetic SECOR allows continents and islands to be brought within the same geodetic global grid. Each ground station was entirely portable and contained 3 units: a radio frequency shelter, a data handling shelter and a storage shelter. Lighter weight, solid-state equipment was developed to replace the initial units. The satellite had a mass of 18 kg and contained a transponder, a telemetry system to monitor temperature and operating voltages, and a power unit comprised of solar panels and batteries. Prime Contractor was Cubic Corporation. Experiments with SECOR, together with the Navy's Timation, provided the technical basis for the GPS Navstar system.

First Launch: 1962.01.24.
Last Launch: 1969.04.14.
Number: 13 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Atlas The Atlas rocket, originally developed as America's first ICBM, was the basis for most early American space exploration and was that country's most successful medium-lift commercial launch vehicle. It launched America's first astronaut into orbit; the first generations of spy satellites; the first lunar orbiters and landers; the first probes to Venus, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn; and was America's most successful commercial launcher of communications satellites. Its innovative stage-and-a-half and 'balloon tank' design provided the best dry-mass fraction of any launch vehicle ever built. It was retired in 2004 after 576 launches in a 47-year career. More...
  • Delta The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Development began in 1955 and it continued in service in the 21st Century despite numerous candidate replacements. More...
  • Scout Solid-fuel, light payload, lower-cost launch vehicle developed by the Air Force and NASA in the late 1950's and used in a variety of configurations over thirty years. Launched from Cape Canaveral, Vandenberg, Wallops Island, and from Italy's equatorial San Marco platform off Kenya. Italy studied but did not develop subsequent upgraded versions. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Atlas The Atlas rocket, originally developed as America's first ICBM, was the basis for most early American space exploration and was that country's most successful medium-lift commercial launch vehicle. It launched America's first astronaut into orbit; the first generations of spy satellites; the first lunar orbiters and landers; the first probes to Venus, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn; and was America's most successful commercial launcher of communications satellites. Its innovative stage-and-a-half and 'balloon tank' design provided the best dry-mass fraction of any launch vehicle ever built. It was retired in 2004 after 576 launches in a 47-year career. More...
  • Delta American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Delta began as Thor, a crash December 1955 program to produce an intermediate range ballistic missile using existing components, which flew thirteen months after go-ahead. Fifteen months after that, a space launch version flew, using an existing upper stage. The addition of solid rocket boosters allowed the Thor core and Able/Delta upper stages to be stretched. Costs were kept down by using first and second-stage rocket engines surplus to the Apollo program in the 1970's. Continuous introduction of new 'existing' technology over the years resulted in an incredible evolution - the payload into a geosynchronous transfer orbit increasing from 68 kg in 1962 to 3810 kg by 2002. Delta survived innumerable attempts to kill the program and replace it with 'more rationale' alternatives. By 2008 nearly 1,000 boosters had flown over a fifty-year career, and cancellation was again announced. More...
  • Thor Able-Star American orbital launch vehicle. As Thor Able but with enlarged Ablestar second stage with 2 1/2 x greater burn time. More...
  • Scout American all-solid orbital launch vehicle. Solid-fuel, light payload, lower-cost launch vehicle developed by the Air Force and NASA in the late 1950's and used in a variety of configurations over thirty years. Launched from Cape Canaveral, Vandenberg, Wallops Island, and from Italy's equatorial San Marco platform off Kenya. Italy studied but did not develop subsequent upgraded versions. More...
  • Thor Agena D American orbital launch vehicle. Two stage vehicle consisting of 1 x Thor DM-21 + 1 x Agena D More...
  • Scout B American all-solid orbital launch vehicle. Four stage vehicle consisting of 1 x Algol 2B + 1 x Castor 2 + 1 x Antares 2 + 1 x FW4S More...
  • Thor Burner 2 American orbital launch vehicle. Two stage vehicle consisting of 1 x Thor DM-18A + 1 x Star 37B More...
  • Thor Burner American orbital launch vehicle. Thor DM-18A with 'Burner' upper stage solid rocket packages used for launch of classified payloads. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • USN American agency overseeing development of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. USN Joint Task Force 7, USA. More...
  • Cubic American manufacturer of spacecraft. Cubic, USA. More...
  • US Army American agency overseeing development of spacecraft. US Army, USA. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • JPL Mission and Spacecraft Library, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1997. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Lockheed Martin Coporation, Atlas Family Fact Sheets, September 1998.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Launch Log, October 1998. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Aerospace Yearbook, 1966,

Associated Launch Sites
  • Wallops Island Small NASA launch site for sounding rocket launches and occasional Scout launches to orbit. Air launches are conducted from the Drop Zone Wallops Island, 37.00 N 72.0 W. With the last orbital launch in 1985 and the decline in sounding rocket launches, Wallops fell into near-disuse as a launch center. Its fortunes revised with the establishment of Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport in 2005 and orbital launches resumed in 2010. More...
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Vandenberg Vandenberg Air Force Base is located on the Central Coast of California about 240 km northwest of Los Angeles. It is used for launches of unmanned government and commercial satellites into polar orbit and intercontinental ballistic missile test launches toward the Kwajalein Atoll. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC1E Delta launch complex. Originally a Thor 75 SMS launch pad. Upgraded to a space launch complex in 1967. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC2E Delta launch complex. Originally a Thor 75 SMS launch pad. Upgraded to a space launch complex in 1966. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC10W Delta launch complex. Originally a Thor 75 SMS launch pad. Upgraded to a launch emplacement in 1965. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC3E Atlas V, Atlas launch complex. Atlas test facility, originally designated PALC1-2, then LC1-2, and finally upgraded to a Space Launch Facility in 1966. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC4E Titan, Atlas launch complex. First designated PALC2-4 and used to launch Atlas Agena D with KH-7 spysats. Rebuilt after MOL cancellation in 1970 to handle Titan 3D with KH-9 and KH-11 spysats. Upgraded in 1989-1990 for Titan 4. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC17B Delta launch complex. Part of a dual launch pad complex built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Upgraded over the decades for use with Thor, Delta, Delta II, and Delta III launch vehicles, it remained in use for over half a century. More...
  • Vandenberg SLC2W Delta launch complex. Originally a Thor 75 SMS launch pad. Upgraded to a space launch complex in 1966. More...

SECOR Chronology


1962 January 24 - . 09:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Able-Star. LV Configuration: Thor Ablestar 311 AB010. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Secor - . Payload: Secor. Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Spacecraft: SECOR. COSPAR: F620124C.

1964 January 11 - . 20:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC1E. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Agena D SLV-2. LV Configuration: Thor SLV-2 Agena D 390 / Agena D 2354.
  • SECOR 1 - . Payload: EGRS 1. Mass: 18 kg (39 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 729 . COSPAR: 1964-001C. Apogee: 922 km (572 mi). Perigee: 904 km (561 mi). Inclination: 69.9000 deg. Period: 103.30 min. Summary: Located Pacific islands. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1965 March 9 - . 18:29 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Agena D SLV-2. LV Configuration: Thor SLV-2 Agena D 419 / Agena D SS-01A 2701.
  • SECOR 3 - . Payload: EGRS 3. Mass: 18 kg (39 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1208 . COSPAR: 1965-016E. Apogee: 925 km (574 mi). Perigee: 898 km (557 mi). Inclination: 70.1000 deg. Period: 103.20 min. Summary: Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1965 March 11 - . 13:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2E. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Able-Star. LV Configuration: Thor Ablestar 440 AB018.
  • SECOR 2 - . Payload: EGRS 2. Mass: 18 kg (39 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. Decay Date: 1968-02-26 . USAF Sat Cat: 1250 . COSPAR: 1965-017B. Apogee: 1,014 km (630 mi). Perigee: 296 km (183 mi). Inclination: 90.0000 deg. Period: 97.90 min. Summary: Failed. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1965 April 3 - . 21:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC4E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Agena D SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 Agena D 7401 / Agena D.
  • SECOR 4 - . Payload: EGRS 4. Mass: 40 kg (88 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1315 . COSPAR: 1965-027B. Apogee: 1,316 km (817 mi). Perigee: 1,267 km (787 mi). Inclination: 90.2000 deg. Period: 111.40 min. Summary: Failed. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A)..

1965 August 10 - . 17:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. Launch Complex: Wallops Island LA3A. LV Family: Scout. Launch Vehicle: Scout B. LV Configuration: Scout B S131R.
  • SECOR 5 (EGRS 5) - . Payload: SEV / FW4S. Mass: 24 kg (52 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Langley. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1506 . COSPAR: 1965-063A. Apogee: 2,419 km (1,503 mi). Perigee: 1,134 km (704 mi). Inclination: 69.2000 deg. Period: 122.20 min. Summary: Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space (US Cat B). .
  • Secor 5 - . Payload: Secor 5. Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1502 . COSPAR: 1965-063B. Apogee: 2,424 km (1,506 mi). Perigee: 1,136 km (705 mi). Inclination: 69.2000 deg. Period: 122.22 min.

1966 June 9 - . 20:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Agena D SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 Agena D 7201 / Agena D 1351.
  • SECOR 6 - . Payload: EGRS 6. Mass: 17 kg (37 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. Decay Date: 1967-07-06 . USAF Sat Cat: 2205 . COSPAR: 1966-051B. Apogee: 3,646 km (2,265 mi). Perigee: 168 km (104 mi). Inclination: 90.0000 deg. Period: 125.00 min. Summary: Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1966 August 19 - . 19:26 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Agena D SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 Agena D 7202 / Agena D 1352.
  • SECOR 7 - . Payload: EGRS 7. Mass: 17 kg (37 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 2411 . COSPAR: 1966-077B. Apogee: 3,700 km (2,200 mi). Perigee: 3,671 km (2,281 mi). Inclination: 89.7000 deg. Period: 167.50 min. Summary: Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1966 October 5 - . 22:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Agena D SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 Agena D 7203 / Agena D 1353.
  • SECOR 8 - . Payload: EGRS 8. Mass: 17 kg (37 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 2520 . COSPAR: 1966-089B. Apogee: 3,707 km (2,303 mi). Perigee: 3,674 km (2,282 mi). Inclination: 90.0000 deg. Period: 167.60 min. Summary: Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1967 June 29 - . 21:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC10W. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Burner 2. LV Configuration: Thor Burner 2 171.
  • SECOR 9 - . Payload: EGRS 9. Mass: 20 kg (44 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 2861 . COSPAR: 1967-065A. Apogee: 3,940 km (2,440 mi). Perigee: 3,803 km (2,363 mi). Inclination: 90.2000 deg. Period: 172.10 min. Summary: Location survey. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1968 May 18 - . 08:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2E. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thorad Agena D SLV-2G. LV Configuration: Thorad SLV-2G Agena D 520 (TA9) / Agena D 6221 (TA. FAILURE: Failure.
  • EGRS 10 - . Payload: Secor 10. Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Spacecraft: Secor. COSPAR: F680518B.

1969 April 14 - . 07:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2E. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thorad Agena D SLV-2G. LV Configuration: Thorad SLV-2G Agena D 543 (TA10) / Agena D 6222 (T.
  • SECOR 13 - . Payload: EGRS 13. Mass: 20 kg (44 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USA ACE. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 3891 . COSPAR: 1969-037B. Apogee: 1,129 km (701 mi). Perigee: 1,070 km (660 mi). Inclination: 100.3000 deg. Period: 107.30 min. Summary: Spacecraft engaged in practical applications and uses of space technology such as weather or communication (US Cat C). .

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