Encyclopedia Astronautica
RD-301



rd301.jpg
RD-301
NPO Enerogmash Museum, November 1992
Credit: © Dietrich Haeseler
Glushko exotic LF2/Ammonia rocket engine. 96.670 kN. Proton K stage 4. Developed 1965-77. Developed by Glushko beginning in 1965. Planned for use in Proton K-4H high energy upper stage. Motor tested but never flown. Isp=400s. First flight 1977.

Application: Proton K stage 4.

Engine: 183 kg (403 lb). Chamber Pressure: 117.60 bar. Area Ratio: 108.7. Thrust to Weight Ratio: 54.6448087431694. Oxidizer to Fuel Ratio: 2.7. Coefficient of Thrust vacuum: 1.14369823635204. Coefficient of Thrust sea level: .25.

AKA: 8D21; RD-301; 8D21.
Status: Developed 1965-77.
Unfuelled mass: 183 kg (403 lb).
Height: 1.89 m (6.20 ft).
Diameter: 0.98 m (3.21 ft).
Thrust: 96.67 kN (21,732 lbf).
Specific impulse: 400 s.
Burn time: 750 s.
First Launch: 1965-77.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Glushko Russian manufacturer of rocket engines and rockets. Glushko Design Bureau, Russia. More...

Associated Propellants
  • LF2/Ammonia Liquid Fluorine is the highest performance oxidiser and in the early 1960's it seemed in both American and Russia that a new generation of higher performance engines would emerge. However although test engines were built, fluorine was found to be just too toxic and reactive to be safely used as a propellant. Ammonia (NH3) is a colourless gas and liquid with a strong irritating characteristic odour. More...

Bibliography
  • Kudryavtseva, V M, ed., Zhidkostnikh Raketnikh Dvigatley, Visshaya Shkola, Moscow, 1993.
  • Vetrov, G S, S. P. Korolev i evo delo, Nauka, Moscow, 1998.
  • Haeseler, Dietrich, Information from NPO Energomash museum exhibit, Nov. 1992 via Dietrich Haeseler.
  • Sergienko, A; Chervakov, V, "Russian Rocket Engines Design", Fifth Symposium Propulsion, Paper 5.3, Paris, May 1996 via Dietrich Haeseler.

Associated Stages
  • Proton K-4H LF2/Ammonia propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 21,700/3,000 kg. Thrust 98.00 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 401 seconds. More...

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