Encyclopedia Astronautica
Redesigned SRM


Thiokol solid rocket engine. 11,520 kN. In Production. Isp=268s. Replacement shuttle solid rocket booster with redesigned field joints to prevent failure that caused the Challenger disaster.

Mass: 569,893 kg. Length: 38.47 m. Diameter: 3847 mm. Propellant Type: TP-H1148 HB Polymer, 16% Al, and 70% AP. Propellant Shape: 11-point star forward with a double taper cylinder . Propellant Mass Fraction: 0.883 (503,487 kg). Burn Time: 123.6 sec action, 111.7 sec web. Thrust: 11.52 MN average vacuum, and 14.77 MN maximum vacuum. Isp: 268.6 sec vacuum. Itotal: 296.3 MNs vacuum. Pressure: 62.4 atm maximum (MEOP 69.1) and 45 atm average. Nozzle Throat Diameter: 136.8 cm. Nozzle Length: 454 cm. Nozzle Exit Diameter: 380.1 cm (expansion ratio 7.72). Nozzle Materials: D6AC steel for fixed housing with throat and forward exit cone housings. aluminum for nose inlet and aft exit cone housing. Casing Materials: D6AC steel with 1.165 cm minimum thickness. Igniter: forward end internally mounted 62.1 kg of TP-H1178 case-bonded 40-point star.

Chamber Pressure: 46.00 bar. Area Ratio: 7.72. Propellant Formulation: PBAN.

AKA: Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor.
Status: In Production.
Gross mass: 569,893 kg (1,256,398 lb).
Unfuelled mass: 66,406 kg (146,400 lb).
Height: 38.47 m (126.21 ft).
Diameter: 3.85 m (12.62 ft).
Thrust: 11,520.00 kN (2,589,790 lbf).
Specific impulse: 269 s.
Burn time: 124 s.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Thiokol American manufacturer of rocket engines and rockets. Thiokol Corporation, Ogden, UT, USA. More...

Associated Propellants
  • Solid Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. More...

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use