Encyclopedia Astronautica
XR2P1


XCOR Nitrous oxide/Alcohol rocket engine. 0.067 kN. First stages. Hardware. Engine was run on oxygen and nitrous oxide oxidizers, with propane, ethane, kerosene, turpentine, and a variety of alcohols.

A 67-newton engine, designated XR2P1, using nitrous oxide and ethane as propellants, was initially built to test the design of proposed larger engines. With a cumulative burn time of 103 minutes, this engine had completed in excess of 1,189 runs. It continued to serve as a workhorse engine for a wide variety of experiments, crew training activities, and educational demonstrations. The XR2P1 has run on oxygen and nitrous oxide oxidizers, with propane, ethane, kerosene, turpentine, and a variety of alcohols.

Application: First stages.

Status: Hardware.
Thrust: 67 N (15 lbf).
First Launch: 2000-2004.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
Associated Propellants
  • Nitrous oxide/Alcohol Nitrous oxide has advantages as a rocket engine oxidizer in that it is non-toxic, stable at room temperature, easy to store and relatively safe to carry on a flight. Its disadvantage is that it must be stored as a gas, which make it more bulky than liquid oxidizers. Early storable rocket systems sought to improve ignition characteristics and perforamance by eliminating the kerosene portion of the fuel. Alcohol (C2H5OH) was the fuel used for the German V-2 rocket, and the first derivative rocket engines in the United States, Soviet Union, and China used it as well. Better performance was achieved by increasing the alcohol concentration in the post-war engines. But after better-performance rocket-grade kerosene was developed by Rocketdyne in the REAP program of 1953, use of alcohol was abandoned. More...

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use