Encyclopedia Astronautica
Delta IV



qdelta4t.jpg
Delta IV
Credit: (c) Mark Wade
The Delta IV was the world's first all-Lox/LH2 launch vehicle and represented the only all-new-technology launch vehicle developed in the United States since the 1970's. It was the winner of the bulk of the USAF EELV orders and was based on the all-new RS-68-powered Lox/LH2 cryogenic Common Booster Core (CBC). This could be used with new Delta cryogenic upper stages powered by the RL10 engine but unrelated to previous Centaur upper stages.

It could be flown without augmentation, or use 2-4 large GEM-60 solid rocket boosters. The heavy lift version used two core vehicles as a first stage, flanking the single core vehicle second stage.

The configuration of Delta IV vehicles was encoded as follows:

  • First digit: basic vehicle configuration: 4 = Delta-4 Lox/LH2 core
  • Second digit: Number of GEM-60 solid propellant strap-ons (0, 2, or 4).
  • Third digit: Second stage
    • 4 = Delta-4 Lox/LH2 cryogenic upper stage with 4 m diameter
    • 5 = Delta-4 Lox/LH2 cryogenic upper stage with 5 m diameter
  • Fourth digit: Third stage
    • 0 = No third stage
    • 3 = Star 37D / TE-364-3 solid propellant kick stage
    • 4 = Star 37E / TE-364-4 solid propellant kick stage
    • 5 = Star-48B / PAM-D solid propellant kick stage (often listed as '0' upper stage with a PAM-D due to the modular nature of the PAM configuration).
    • 6 = Star 37FM solid propellant kick stage
  • Optional letter after fourth digit: An 'H' here indicates a 'Heavy' configuration, indicating use of two strap-on Common Booster Cores (CBC) to supplement the CBC on the core stage.
  • Dash number: Payload fairing. For Delta II, this indicates the diameter of the fairing in feet. For Delta III or Delta IV, it indicates the length of the fairing in meters.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Spacecraft
  • DSP American military early warning satellite. 23 launches, 1970.11.06 (IMEWS 1) to 2007.11.11 (USA 176). An evolving series of satellites built by the United States to detect intercontinental ballistic missiles on launch. More...
  • DSCS III American military communications satellite. 15 launches, 1982.10.30 (DSCS III-01) to 2003.08.29 (USA 170). DSCS satellites provided secure voice and data communications for the US military. More...
  • HS 601 American communications satellite bus. First launch 1990.01.09. 3-axis unified ARC 22 N and one Marquardt 490 N bipropellant thrusters, Sun and Barnes Earth sensors and two 61 Nms 2-axis gimbaled momentum bias wheels. More...
  • Advanced Orion American military naval signals intelligence and reconnaisance satellite. Highly classified, operational, first launch 1995.05.14. More...
  • DMSP Block 5D-3 American earth weather satellite. 4 launches, 1999.12.12 (USA 147) to 2009-10-18. Military spacecraft similar in design to the civilian NOAA weather satellites. More...
  • HS 702 American communications satellite bus. Operational, first launched 1999.12.22. More...
  • 3CSat American technology satellite. 2 launched, 2004.12.21. The Three-Corner Sat mission was to obtain stereo images of clouds and test artificial intelligence software. More...
  • Jumpseat-2 American military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. 2 launches, 2006.06.25 (USA 200) to 2008.03.13 (USA 200). More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Delta IV American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta IV was the world's first all-Lox/LH2 launch vehicle and represented the only all-new-technology launch vehicle developed in the United States since the 1970's. It was the winner of the bulk of the USAF EELV orders and was based on the all-new RS-68-powered Lox/LH2 cryogenic Common Booster Core (CBC). This could be used with new Delta cryogenic upper stages powered by the RL10 engine but unrelated to previous Centaur upper stages. It could be flown without augmentation, or use 2-4 large GEM-60 solid rocket boosters. The heavy lift version used two core vehicles as a first stage, flanking the single core vehicle second stage. More...
  • Delta IV Medium+ (4.2) American orbital launch vehicle. As Delta 4 medium but with 2 x GEM-60 solid rocket boosters and a 4 m diameter payload fairing. More...
  • Delta IV Medium American orbital launch vehicle. Basic Delta-4 vehicle with no strap-ons, the core vehicle, and RL10B-1 upper stage with a 4 m diameter payload fairing. World's first all-cryogenic launch vehicle. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy American orbital launch vehicle. Heavy lift all-cryogenic launch vehicle using two Delta-4 core vehicles as first stage flanking a single core vehicle as second stage. A heavy upper stage is carried with a 5 m diameter payload fairing. More...
  • Delta IV Medium+ (5.2) American orbital launch vehicle. As Delta 4 medium but with 2 x GEM-60 solid rocket boosters and a 5 m diameter payload fairing. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 35 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding RS-68B upgraded engines to the core vehicles and an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 2 MB-45 or RL-45 20 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 40 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding 4 GEM-60 solid rocket boosters, RS-68 Regen upgraded engines with regeneratively-cooled nozzles to the core vehicles, and cryogenic propellant densification. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 67 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering seven common booster modules, and using an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 2 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines. A payload fairing over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 48 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding 4 GEM-60 solid rocket boosters, RS-68 Regen upgraded engines with regeneratively-cooled nozzles to the core vehicles, cryogenic propellant densification, and cryogenic propellant cross-feed between the strap-ons and core. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 42 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding new RS-800 engines to the core vehicles, an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 2 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines, and aluminium-lithium lightweight alloy in place of the existing aluminium in all stages. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 53 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering five common booster modules, using an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 2 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines, and aluminium-lithium lightweight alloy in place of the existing aluminium in all stages. Payload fairings over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 30 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding 4 GEM-60 solid rocket boosters. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 43 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding 4 GEM-60 solid rocket boosters, RS-68 Regen upgraded engines with regeneratively-cooled nozzles to the core vehicles, cryogenic propellant densification, and an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 1 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engine. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 45 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by adding 6 GEM-60 solid rocket boosters, RS-68B upgraded engines to the core vehicles, and an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 1 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engine. 6.5 m diameter payload fairing. Introduction would require modifications to existing launch pads. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 94 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering seven common booster modules, using a new RS-800K engine in the booster stages, an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 4 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines, and aluminium-lithium lightweight alloy in place of the existing aluminium in all stages. Payload fairings over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 70 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering seven common booster modules, using an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 3 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines. A payload fairing over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 76 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering seven common booster modules, using an AUS-60 upper stage powered by 3 MB-60 or RL-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 engines, and aluminium-lithium lightweight alloy in place of the existing aluminium in all stages. Payload fairings over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Delta IV Heavy Upgrade 87 t American orbital launch vehicle. Proposed upgrade to Delta IV Heavy by clustering seven common booster modules, using a new RS-800K engine in the booster stages, and an AUS-60 27 tonne thrust Lox/LH2 upper stage. Payload fairings over 6.5 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure. More...
  • Next Genertion Delta 100 t American orbital launch vehicle. Conceptual next generation Delta booster beyond Delta IV Heavy, equalling Saturn V of the 1960's in payload capability. The booster would use two parallel 7-m-diameter booster stages, a notional RS-XXX Lox/LH2 rocket motor, and a 7 m diameter upper stage and fairing. Payload fairings of 7 m diameter could be accomodated. Introduction would require new launch pads and booster assembly infrastructure, and a new factory to handle the larger-diameter tooling. More...
  • Delta IV Small American orbital launch vehicle. Light launch vehicle using the Delta-4 core with the traditional Delta K and PAM-D upper stages. 2 m diameter payload fairing. Not flown as of 2008 but cancellation of the Delta II could lead to its eventual use. More...
  • Delta IV Medium+ (5.4) American orbital launch vehicle. As Delta 4 medium but with 4 x GEM-60 solid rocket boosters and a 5 m diameter payload fairing. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Vandenberg Vandenberg Air Force Base is located on the Central Coast of California about 240 km northwest of Los Angeles. It is used for launches of unmanned government and commercial satellites into polar orbit and intercontinental ballistic missile test launches toward the Kwajalein Atoll. More...

Delta IV Chronology


2002 November 20 - . 22:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta 4M+(4,2) D4-1 (293) 4240.
  • Eutelsat W5 - . Payload: W1A. Mass: 3,170 kg (6,980 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Cannes. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Spacebus 3000. USAF Sat Cat: 27554 . COSPAR: 2002-051A. Apogee: 35,801 km (22,245 mi). Perigee: 35,788 km (22,237 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.50 min. Maiden flight of the Delta 4 EELV booster, delayed due to development problems from January and November 2001, April 30, July 15, August 31, October 9, November 3, 16 and 19. EUTELSAT W5 was a European (EUTELSAT Consortium) geostationary communication spacecraft. EUTELSAT W5 was to provide voice, video, and Internet services to all countries in western Europe, central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent through its 24 Ku-band transponders after being parked over 70.5 E longitude. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 70.55E drifting at 0.004W degrees per day.

2002 December 13 - . LV Family: Atlas V; Delta IV.
  • USAF to subsidise EELV's - . Nation: USA. The US Air Force asked the Congress to provide $1 billion of subsidies in 2004-2009 for the Atlas V and Delta 4 EELV launch vehicles. The collapse of the commercial satellite market invalidated the cost model on which the manufacturers invested their own funds in development. Lack of adequate sales could have meant the closure of the production line of one or both of the launch vehicles on which the US government would rely for future space missions. The US Air Force asked for a $200-million first tranche n FY2004.

2003 March 11 - . 00:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium. LV Configuration: Delta 4M D4-2 (296) 4040.
  • USA 167 - . Payload: DSCS III A-3. Mass: 1,235 kg (2,722 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Program: DSCS. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: DSCS III. USAF Sat Cat: 27691 . COSPAR: 2003-008A. Summary: First flight of a fully cryogenic orbital launch vehicle. Delayed from December 2001, February 2, 6, 8, 11, 12 and March 8 2003. Satellite mas 2,733 kg with kick stage..

2003 August 29 - . 23:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium. LV Configuration: Delta 4M D4-3 (301) 4040.
  • USA 170 - . Payload: DSCS-3-B6. Mass: 1,235 kg (2,722 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: DSCS III. USAF Sat Cat: 27875 . COSPAR: 2003-040A. Summary: Delayed from July 1, 11 and 23, then August 3 and 28..

2004 December 21 - . 21:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy. LV Configuration: Delta 4H D4-4 (310) 4050H.
  • USA 181 - . Payload: Demosat / HLVOLSDP. Mass: 5,993 kg (13,212 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. USAF Sat Cat: 28500 . COSPAR: 2004-050A. Apogee: 36,413 km (22,625 mi). Perigee: 19,035 km (11,827 mi). Inclination: 13.4790 deg. Period: 1,044.23 min. Mass model payload. First launch of a heavy EELV. The demonstration satellite was supposed to have been inserted into a sub-geosynchronous 36,350 km circular orbit but was instead deployed in a 19,035 km x 36,413 km orbit following a 5-hour and 50-minute flight. A shorter than expected first burn of the Centaur upper stage led to an orbit well below that planned. The Air Force EELV program office claimed that the primary flight objectives were accomplished. These included the heavy boost phase, flight of the new five-meter diameter Centaur upper stage and five-meter payload fairing, extended coast, upper stage third burn and payload separation, and activation and usage of Space Launch Complex 37B. Delayed from September 2003, July 3, September 10, November 18, December 10, 11 and 12.
  • 3CSat 1 Sparkie - . Payload: Nanosat 2. Mass: 15 kg (33 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: New Mexico. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: 3CSat. COSPAR: 2004-050x. One of a pair of student-built nanosats for stero cloud imagery. The satellites did not contact the ground after separation from the booster in a lower-than-planned orbit and their fate was unclear. It was believed that they separated but re-entered rapidly from the 105 km perigee orbit.
  • 3CSat 2 Ralphie - . Payload: Nanosat 2. Mass: 15 kg (33 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: Colorado. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: 3CSat. COSPAR: 2004-050x.

2006 May 24 - . 22:11 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta 4M+(4,2) D4-5 (315) 4240.
  • GOES-13 - . Mass: 3,199 kg (7,052 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NOAA. Manufacturer: Boeing. Program: GOES. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: HS 601. USAF Sat Cat: 29155 . COSPAR: 2006-018A. Apogee: 35,791 km (22,239 mi). Perigee: 35,779 km (22,231 mi). Inclination: 0.5000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. GOES-13 carried weather imager and sounder instruments, a space environment monitor, and a soft X-ray solar imaging telescope. Mass was 1543 kg empty. It joined GOES 10 (operating as GOES-WEST), GOES 12 (operating as GOES-EAST) and GOES 11 (on standby, set to replace GOES-10 on June 27). As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 105.26W drifting at 0.008W degrees per day.

2006 June 25 - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC6. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta 4M+(4,2) D4-6 (317) 4240.
  • USA 184 - . Payload: NRO L-22. Mass: 4,500 kg (9,900 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Class: Military. Type: Electronic intelligence satellite. Spacecraft: Jumpseat-2. USAF Sat Cat: 29249 . COSPAR: 2006-027A. Secret payload for the National Reconnaissance Office. The intended orbit was thought to be a "Molniya" elliptical 12-hour orbit with an inclination of 63 degrees. American data relay and signals intelligence satellites have used this orbit in the past, notably the Jumpseat series of 1971-1983. A secondary payload was later confirmed to be the first SBIRS-HEO (Space-based Infrared System) sensor. SBIRS was the successor to the DSP (Defence Support Program), which provided early warning of missile launches. Also carried the NASA/Los Alamos TWINS-A magnetospheric research payload

2006 November 4 - . 13:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC6. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium. LV Configuration: Delta 4M D4-7 (320) 4040.
  • DMSP-Block-5D3-F17 - . Mass: 1,154 kg (2,544 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Program: DMSP. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: DMSP Block 5D-3. USAF Sat Cat: 29522 . COSPAR: 2006-050A. Apogee: 855 km (531 mi). Perigee: 841 km (522 mi). Inclination: 98.8000 deg. Period: 101.90 min. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite with the Operational Linescan System camera, a microwave imager-sounder, ultraviolet spectrometers, particle detectors, a magnetometer, and a laser threat warning sensor. Reportedly went for a time into safe mode due to software problems after launch. The booster upper stage was conducted a maneuver to deorbit itself after placing the satellite in orbit. After the burn an explosion evidently occurred aboard the stage - dozens of objects were tracked in various orbits with perigees down to 670 km and apogees up to 851 km.

2007 November 11 - . 01:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy. LV Configuration: Delta 4H D4-8 (329) 4050H.
  • USA 197 - . Payload: DSP-1 Block 18 F23. Mass: 2,270 kg (5,000 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NSA. Manufacturer: TRW. Class: Military. Type: Early warning satellite. Spacecraft: DSP. USAF Sat Cat: 32287 . COSPAR: 2007-054A. Apogee: 36,325 km (22,571 mi). Perigee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Final DSP launch. The series was to be replaced by SBIRS, which was in the middle of a troubled development program. The Delta 4H performed well after problems on its first launch. The RL10-powered upper stage made three burns before releasing the early-warning satellite in its final geosynchronous orbit. Total cost of the flight was $700 million, with the DSP worth $400 million. The DSP carried a special 25 kg supplementary payload designed to detect extremely small nuclear tests in space. The payload was required by a secret White House/National Security Council directive to detect any attempted covert nuclear tests by Iran or North Korea.

2009 January 18 - . 02:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy.
  • USA 202 - . Payload: NROL-26. Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Class: Military. Type: Military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. Spacecraft: Advanced Orion. USAF Sat Cat: 33490 . COSPAR: 2009-001A. Apogee: 38,077 km (23,659 mi). Perigee: 35,943 km (22,333 mi). Inclination: 3.0000 deg. Period: 1,440.00 min. Summary: Classified signals intelligence satellite. It was speculated that it was a large-antenna spacecraft with the same mission as earlier Rhyolite, Aquacade, Magnum, and Orion missions..

2009 June 27 - . 22:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2) s/n D342.
  • GOES 14 - . Payload: GOES O. Mass: 3,210 kg (7,070 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Program: GOES. Spacecraft: HS 601. USAF Sat Cat: 35491 . COSPAR: 2009-033A. Apogee: 35,788 km (22,237 mi). Perigee: 35,786 km (22,236 mi). Inclination: 0.5000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite..

2009 December 6 - . 01:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (5.4).
  • USA 211 - . Payload: WGS 3. Mass: 5,990 kg (13,200 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 702. USAF Sat Cat: 36108 . COSPAR: 2009-068A. Apogee: 64,827 km (40,281 mi). Perigee: 31,268 km (19,428 mi). Inclination: 0.6000 deg. Period: 2,106.00 min. Summary: US Army Wideband Global Satcom, carried X-band and Ka-band communications payloads..

2010 March 4 - . 23:57 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2). LV Configuration: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2) s/n D348.
  • GOES 15 - . Mass: 3,240 kg (7,140 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Program: GOES. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: HS 601. USAF Sat Cat: 36411 . COSPAR: 2010-008A. Apogee: 35,803 km (22,246 mi). Perigee: 35,770 km (22,220 mi). Inclination: 0.3000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min.

2010 May 28 - . 03:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2).
  • USA 213 - . Payload: Navstar 65 / GPS SVN 62 IIF SV-1. Nation: USA. Agency: Martin. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2F. USAF Sat Cat: 36585 . COSPAR: 2010-022A. Apogee: 20,225 km (12,567 mi). Perigee: 20,188 km (12,544 mi). Inclination: 55.0000 deg. Period: 719.00 min. Summary: First Block IIF Global Positioning System satellite. Supported the L1M and L2M military GPS channels, the L2C civilian channel and a new L5 civilian channel. Also included a nuclear explosion detection system..

2010 November 21 - . 22:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy.
  • USA 223 - . Payload: NROL-32. Nation: USA. Class: Military. Type: Electronic intelligence satellite. Spacecraft: Advanced Orion. USAF Sat Cat: 37232 . COSPAR: 2010-063A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Probable geosynchronous signals intelligence satellite..

2011 January 20 - . 21:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC6. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy.
  • USA 224 - . Payload: NROL-49. Nation: USA. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Improved Crystal. USAF Sat Cat: 37348 . COSPAR: 2011-002A. Summary: National Reconnaissance Office satellite placed into 252 km x 1023 km x 97.9 deg polar orbit, consistent with reports that it is was an Improved CRYSTAL type (KH-11 derivative) imaging reconnaissance satellite..

2011 March 11 - . 23:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2).
  • USA 227 - . Payload: NROL-27. Nation: USA. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: SDS-3. USAF Sat Cat: 37377 . COSPAR: 2011-011A. Summary: Probable classified Satellite Data System communications satellite inserted into geostationary orbit..

2011 July 16 - . 06:41 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Medium+ (4.2).
  • USA 232 - . Payload: Navstar 66 / SVN 63 / GPSIIF-2. Nation: USA. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: GPS Block 2F. USAF Sat Cat: 37753 . COSPAR: 2011-036A. Apogee: 20,188 km (12,544 mi). Perigee: 20,177 km (12,537 mi). Inclination: 55.0000 deg. Period: 718.00 min.

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