Encyclopedia Astronautica
IRBM Base


Category of launch sites.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Launch Sites
  • V-2 Battery 444 V-2 battery 444 was assigned to the northern group of V-2 mobile launchers and began operations on 31 August 1944, with the first successful launch on 2 September 1944. V-2 Gruppe Nord launchers were distributed along the English Channel, in a restricted zone north and south of The Hague, which included Hoek den Holland, Den Haag, and Wassenaar, all used for launches against London. On 28 January 1945 Battery 444 moved to Burgsteinfurt in the southern group of V-2 launchers, and continued operations with launches against Antwerp and Lille. More...
  • V-2 Battery 485 V-2 batteries 1./485, 2./485 and 3./485 were assigned to the northern group of V-2 mobile launchers around the Hague and began operations on 3 September 1944, with the first successful launch on 8 September 1944. In late October 1944 3./485 was moved to Burgsteinfurt, and conducted operations from the southern group with launches against Antwerp and Lille. All units of battery 485 ended operations in the face of allied advances in the last days of March 1945. More...
  • V-2 Battery 836 V-2 batteries 1./ 836, 2./836, and 3./836 were part of the southern group of V-2 mobile launchers based in the Ardennes forest and kept a constant barrage against Paris, Lille, and other French towns for three weeks from 10 September 1944. Focus then shifted to the Allied port facilities at Antwerp from 19 October until the end of March 1945. After retreating farther into Germany, on 8 April the battery destroyed its rockets and launching equipment and ceased to exist. More...
  • V-2 Battery SS Abt 500 V-2 Battery SS Abt 500 was first assigned to the southern group of V-2 mobile launchers and began operations near Breitenfurt on 10 October 1944. Just over a month later it was moved to the northern group near the Hague. It operated from various locations there until forced cease operations and retreat before the Allied advance on 28 March 1945. More...
  • V-2 Gruppe Sued The southern group of V-2 mobile launchers saw a few initial launches by Battery 444 from the Ardennes forest against Paris beginning on 6 September, 1944. 444 moved on to Holland on the 10 September. Thereafter the batteries 1./ 836, 2./836, and 3./836 deployed and kept a constant barrage against Paris, Lille, and other French towns for three weeks. Focus then shifted to the Allied port facilities at Antwerp from 19 October until the end of the war. More...
  • V-2 Gruppe Nord The northern group of V-2 mobile launchers began operations on 31 August 1944, with the first successful launch on 2 September 1944. Batteries assigned to Gruppe Nord included 444, 1./485, 2./485, and SS Battery 500. V-2 Gruppe Nord launchers were distributed along the English Channel, in a restricted zone north and south of The Hague, which included Hoek den Holland, Den Haag, and Wassenaar, all used for launches against London; Zwolle-Hellendoorn-Enchede, used for launches by SS 500 against Antwerp; and Burgsteinfurt, used for launches against Antwerp and Lille. More...
  • Medved Early ballistic missile operating base, 1953-1960, for units deployed with two R-2 launchers, later eight R-5 missiles. More...
  • Chelkar Tactical missile site, known to have been used for 32 launches from 1958 to 1962, reaching up to 500 kilometers altitude. More...
  • RAF Driffield At this location the 8th RAF Strategic Missile Squadron operated 15 Thor IRBM launchers from 22 December 1959 to April 1963. They were withdrawn as part of the secret agreement between Kennedy and Khrushchev ending the Cuban missile crisis, under which all Thor missiles were to be removed from Europe. More...
  • RAF Feltwell At this location the 77th RAF Strategic Missile Squadron operated 15 Thor IRBM launchers from 15 June 22 1959 to 1 July 1963. They were withdrawn as part of the secret agreement between Kennedy and Khrushchev ending the Cuban missile crisis, under which all Thor missiles were to be removed from Europe. More...
  • RAF Hemswell At this location the 7th RAF Strategic Missile Squadron operated 15 Thor IRBM launchers from 11 Sept. 1959 to 15 May 1963. They were withdrawn as part of the secret agreement between Kennedy and Khrushchev ending the Cuban missile crisis, under which all Thor missiles were to be removed from Europe. More...
  • Gvardeisk Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1990. This was one of the oldest rocket units in the Soviet Union, being first formed at Kapustin Yar, 1950-1953, then deploying to Medved, Novgorod 1953-1960. Earlier had fielded R-1, R-2, and R-5 missiles. These were followed by R-12 IRBM's. More...
  • Kolomiya Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1990. In the 1950's it was a base for units deployed with two R-2 launchers. Probably during the period as an RVSN division it operated R-12 missiles. More...
  • Lutsk Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1992. Probably an R-12 missile base. More...
  • Manzovka/Ussuriysk Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1970, probably operating R-12 launchers. In the 1950's the base for originally fielded two R-1 launchers, followed by eight R-5 launchers. More...
  • Postavy Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1993. Base for units deployed with 12 R-12 and later 9 Pioner missile launchers. More...
  • RAF North Luffenham At this location the RAF No. 144 (Strategic Missile) Squadron operated 15 Thor IRBM launchers from 29 April 29 1960 to September 1963. The other units in the North Luffenham Thor complex were No. 218 (SM) Sqn at Harrington, Northamptonshire, No. 223 (SM) Sqn at Folkingham, Lincolnshire, No. 130 (SM) Sqn at Polebrook, Northamptonshire and No. 254 (SM) Sqn at Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire. They were withdrawn as part of the secret agreement between Kennedy and Khrushchev ending the Cuban missile crisis, under which all Thor missiles were to be removed from Europe. More...
  • Ruzhany Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1990. Base for units deployed with R-12 and later 6 Pioner missile launchers. More...
  • Siauliai Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-1982. Division then moved to Irkutsk. Base for units deployed with two R-1/R-2 launchers, followed by six R-5, and probably finally R-12 missiles. More...
  • Valga Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1960-on. Perhaps operated R-12 missile. More...
  • Makat Tactical missile base, known to have been used for 34 launches from 1961 to 1965, reaching up to 460 kilometers altitude. More...
  • Belokorovichi Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1991. In the 1950's it was the base for units deployed with four R-1 launchers, followed by two R-2 launchers, then 12 R-5. From 1961 it operated 12 R-14, and possibly additional R-12 missiles. More...
  • Birodbidzhan Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1964. Moved to Tatishchevo.. Base for units deployed with R-1, R-2, R-12, and R-14 missiles. More...
  • Bynolzovo Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-on. Perhaps operated R-12 missiles. More...
  • Dzhambul Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1965, operating 12 R-14 missile launchers. Earlier the base deployed with two R-1 (followed by R-2) launchers. More...
  • Karmelava Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1990. Base for units deployed with 12 R-14, and probably R-12 missiles. More...
  • Nerchinsk Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1965. Moved to Drovyanaya.. Base for units deployed with 12 R-14 and perhaps R-12 missiles. More...
  • Ordzhonikidze Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1981, probably operating R-12 launchers. The division then moved to Barnaul. The base was used for deployment of two R-1/R-2 launchers in the 1950's. More...
  • Romny Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1992. Probably an R-12 missile base. More...
  • Tomsk Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1961-1962. Moved to Gladkaya. More...
  • Al Kahir Ballistic missile launch location known to have been used for 3 launches from 1962 to 1963, reaching up to 80 kilometers altitude. More...
  • Saryozek Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1965-on. Perhaps operated R-12 missiles. More...
  • Khatami Khatami Air Base, located northeast of Isfahan, is a dual military/civilian facility, also known as Isfahan Shahid International Airport. Two tactical fighter squadrons are based there. Aerospace manufacturing and test facilities were being built there prior to the 1979 Iranian revolution by by Bell, Northrop, and Grumman. In the decades thereafter these were developed into aircraft overhaul and repair facilities. Manufacturing and research were accomplished by the Iranian military at Khatami in collaboration with the University of Isfahan, which designed most of Iran's remote piloted vehicles. It was believed the Iran-140 tactical rocket was manufacturered here. More...
  • Neu Ulm US base in the 1980's for 43 Pershing 2 IRBM's. The launchers and missiles were withdrawn and destroyed under the INF Treaty with the Soviet Union. More...
  • Schwaebisch-Gmuend US base in the 1980's for 36 Pershing 2 IRBM's. The launchers and missiles were withdrawn and destroyed under the INF Treaty with the Soviet Union. More...
  • Waldheide-Neckarsulm US base in the 1980's for 36 Pershing 2 IRBM's. The launchers and missiles were withdrawn and destroyed under the INF Treaty with the Soviet Union. More...
  • Barnaul Headquarters of an RVSN Division, 1981-1990. Type of missiles deployed unknown. More...
  • Gitdaeryung North Korean intermediate missile base, south east of Wonson, said to be capable of launching Scud-C's, SCUD-X's and Nodong-A ballistic missiles. Known to have been used for 18 launches from 1984 to 2006, reaching up to 200 kilometers altitude. More...
  • Scud Batteries Mobile Iraqi Scud batteries were known to have been used for 59 wartime launches from 1990 to 1991, reaching up to 100 kilometers altitude, en route to targets in Israel and Saudi Arabia. More...
  • Tabriz What has been identified by Sean O'Connor as Iran's first IRBM field is located 10 kilometers southwest of Tabriz. As of 2008 site consisted of the silo field, an administrative and support area, missile storage bunkers, and an unoccupied HQ-2 surface-to-air missile site. The latter was used as a staging area for mobile Shahab missile transport-erector launchers. The two silos seemed to include blast vents, indicating a hot-launch design. More...
  • Gezgaly Base for units deployed with twelve R-12, and later six Pioner, launchers. More...
  • Kamyshin Base for units deployed with two R-1/R-2 launchers, followed by six R-5. More...
  • Kiev Base for units deployed with six R-5 launchers. More...
  • Lvov Base for units deployed with two R-1 missile launchers. More...
  • Petrikov Base for units deployed with six Pioner missile launchers. More...
  • Priekule Base for units deployed with up to 12 R-14 missile and R-12 missile launchers. Launcher deployment at site retirement was:

    • Vainode: 3 x R-14
    • Nikrace: 3 x R-14
    • Nigrande: 4 x R-14
    Martin Trolle Mikkelsen has photo-documented the site here. More...
  • Rechitsa Base for units deployed with six Pioner missile launchers. More...
  • Slonim Base for units deployed with twelve R-12, and later nine Pioner missile launchers. More...
  • Slutsk Base for units deployed with nine Pioner launchers. More...

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