Encyclopedia Astronautica
STS-49



ists49.jpg
STS-49
Credit: www.spacefacts.de - www.spacefacts.de
Crew: Akers, Brandenstein, Chilton, Hieb, Melnick, Thornton, Thuot. First flight of shuttle Endeavour. First three-person spacewalk. First active dual rendezvous of two orbiting spacecraft (Endeavour and Intelsat-6). Retrieved Intelsat 6 and attached new SRM. First deployment of a drag chute on the orbiter fleet.

Retrieved Intelsat 6 and attached new SRM. First active dual rendezvous of two orbiting spacecraft (Endeavour and Intelsat-Vl) First deployment of a drag chute on the orbiter fleet. Payloads: Intelsat-Vl reboost mission hardware, Assembly of Station by EVA Methods (ASEM), Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG), Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) Calibration Test, Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPl).

Orbits of Earth: 141. Distance traveled: 5,948,165 km. Orbiter Liftoff Mass: 116,390 kg. Orbiter Mass at Landing: 91,464 kg. Payload to Orbit: 14,786 kg. Payload Returned: 3,881 kg. Landed at: Concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, Cali. Landing Speed: 366 kph. Touchdown miss distance: 660 m. Landing Rollout: 2,892 m. EVA: EVA No. 1, Pierre J. Thuot and Richard J. Hieb, 3 hours, 43 minutes duration; EVA No. 2, Pierre J. Thuot and Richard J. Hieb, 5 hours, 30 minutes duration; EVA No. 3, Pierre J. Thuot, Richard J. Hieb, and Thomas D. Akers, 8 hours, 29 minutes duration (first three-person EVA and longest U.S. spacewalk to date); and EVA No. 4, Kathryn C. Thornton and Thomas D. Akers, 7 hours, 45 minutes duration (most EVAs on a flight to date). During EVAs 1 and 2, Thuot and Hieb attempted unsuccessfully to retrieve the Intelsat-Vl satellite using a capture bar. On EVA 3, Thuot, Hieb, and Akers manually captured the satellite, which was subsequently repaired and redeployed. EVA 4 was used to evaluate Space Station assembly by EVA methods. First active dual rendezvous of two orbiting spacecraft (Endeavour and Intelsat-Vl) First deployment of a drag chute on the orbiter fleet.

NASA Official Mission Narrative

Mission Name: STS-49 (47)
Endeavour (1)
Pad 39-B (19)
47th Shuttle Mission
1st Flight OV-105

Crew:
Daniel C. Brandenstein (4), Commander
Kevin P. Chilton (1), Pilot
Pierre J. Thuot (2), Mission Specialist 1
Kathryn C. Thornton (2), Mission Specialist 2
Richard J. Hieb (2), Mission Specialist 3
Thomas D. Akers (2), Mission Specialist 4
Bruce E. Melnick (2), Mission Specialist 5<

Milestones:
On Dock KSC: 5-7-91
VAB: 5-8-91 to complete mfg.
OPF: 7-25-91 to begin processing for STS-49
VAB: 3-7-92
PAD: 3-13-92

Payload:
INTELSAT-VI-RESCUE,ASEM,CPGC,UVPI,AMOS
Mission Objectives:

Launch:
May 7, 1992, 7:40 p.m. EDT. First flight of orbiter Endeavour. Launch originally scheduled for May 4 at 8:34 p.m. EDT, but was moved to May 7 for an earlier launch window opening at 7:O6 p.m. EDT which provided better lighting conditions for photographic documentation of vehicle behavior during the launch phase. Launch delayed 34 minutes due to TAL site weather conditions. Launch Weight: 256,597 lbs.
Orbit:
Altitude: 195 nm
Inclination: 28.35 degrees
Orbits: 141
Duration: 8 days, 21 hours, 17 minutes, 38 seconds.
Distance: 3,696,019 miles

Hardware: (Flow-A FRF-07)
SRB:
ET :
MLP :
SSME-1: SN-2035
SSME-2: SN-2033
SSME-3: SN-2034 (Flow-B)
SRB: BI-050
SRM: 360L022
ET : 43/LWT-36
MLP : 2
SSME-1: SN-2030
SSME-2: SN-2015
SSME-3: SN-2017

Landing:
May 16, 1992, 6:57:38 p.m. EDT, Runway 22, EAFB, CA. Rollout distance 9,49O feet, no braking. First use of a drag chute during landing. Orbiter returned to KSC on May 30, 1992. Landing Weight: 201,649 lbs.

Mission Highlights:
INTELSAT VI (F-3) satellite, stranded in an unusable orbit since launch aboard a Titan vehicle in March 199O, was captured by crewmembers during an EVA (extravehicular activity) and equipped with a new perigee kick motor. The Satellite was subsequently released into orbit and the new motor fired to put the spacecraft into a geosynchronous orbit for operational use.
The capture required three EVAs: a planned one by astronaut
Pierre J. Thuot and Richard J. Hieb who were unable to attach a capture bar to the satellite from a position on the RMS; a second unscheduled but identical attempt the following day; and finally an unscheduled but successful hand capture by Pierre J. Thuot and fellow crewmen
Richard J. Hieb and Thomas D. Akers as commander Daniel C. Brandenstein delicately maneuvered the orbiter to within a few feet of the 4.5-ton communications satellite. An ASEM structure was erected in the cargo bay by the crew to serve as a platform to aid in the hand capture and subsequent attachment of the capture bar.
A planned EVA also was performed by astronauts Kathryn C. Thornton and Thomas D. Akers as part of the Assembly of Station by EVA Methods (ASEM) experiment to demonstrate and verify maintenance and assembly capabilities for Space Station Freedom. The ASEM space walk, originally scheduled for two successive days, was cut to one day because of the lengthy INTELSAT retrieval operation.
Other "payloads of opportunity" experiments conducted included: Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG), Ultraviolet Plume Imager (UVPI) and the Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS) investigation. Mission was extended two days to complete objectives.
The following records were set during the STS-49 mission:
* First EVA involving three astronauts.
* First and second longest EVA to date: 8 hours and 29
minutes and 7 hours and 45 minutes.
* First Shuttle mission to feature four EVAs.
* EVA time for a single Shuttle mission: 25 hours and
27 minutes, or 59:23 person hours.
* First Shuttle mission requiring three rendezvous with an
orbiting spacecraft. Attached a live rocket motor to an
orbiting satellite.
* First use of a-drag chute during a Shuttle landing.

AKA: Endeavour.
First Launch: 1992.05.07.
Last Launch: 1992.05.16.
Duration: 8.89 days.

More... - Chronology...


Associated People
  • Brandenstein Brandenstein, Daniel Charles 'Dan' (1943-) American test pilot astronaut. Flew on STS-8, STS-51-G, STS-32, STS-49. Flew 192 combat missions in Vietnam. More...
  • Thuot Thuot, Pierre Joseph (1945-) American test pilot mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-36, STS-49, STS-62. More...
  • Melnick Melnick, Bruce Edward 'Mel' (1949-) American engineer mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-41, STS-49. More...
  • Akers Akers, Thomas Dale 'Tom' (1951-) American test pilot mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-41, STS-49, STS-61, STS-79. More...
  • Thornton Thornton, Dr Kathryn Ryan Cordell 'Kathy' (1952-) American physicist mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-33, STS-49, STS-61, STS-73. More...
  • Chilton Chilton, Kevin Patrick 'Chili' (1954-) American test pilot astronaut. Flew on STS-49, STS-59, STS-76. More...
  • Hieb Hieb, Richard James 'Rick' (1955-) American engineer mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-39, STS-49, STS-65. More...

Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Endeavour American manned spaceplane. 25 launches, 1992.05.07 to 2011.05.16. Built as a replacement after the loss of the Challenger; named after the first ship commanded by James Cook. More...

See also
Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • NASA American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA, USA. More...
  • NASA Houston American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. Houston, Houston, USA. More...

Associated Programs
  • STS The Space Transportation System (Space Shuttle) was conceived originally as a completely reusable system that would provide cheap, routine access to space and replace all American and civilian military launch vehicles. Crippled by technological overreach, political compromise, and budget limitations, it instead ended up costing more than the expendable rockets it was to have replaced. STS sucked the money out of all other NASA projects for half a century. The military abandoned its use after the Challenger shuttle explosion in the 1980's. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...

STS-49 Chronology


1992 May 7 - . 23:40 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39B. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Shuttle. LV Configuration: Space Shuttle STS-49.
  • STS-49 - . Call Sign: Endeavour. Crew: Akers; Brandenstein; Chilton; Hieb; Melnick; Thornton; Thuot. Payload: Endeavour F01 / Intelsat 6 SRM. Mass: 14,786 kg (32,597 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Akers; Brandenstein; Chilton; Hieb; Melnick; Thornton; Thuot. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-49. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Duration: 8.89 days. Decay Date: 1992-05-16 . USAF Sat Cat: 21963 . COSPAR: 1992-026A. Apogee: 341 km (211 mi). Perigee: 268 km (166 mi). Inclination: 28.3000 deg. Period: 90.60 min. Retrieved Intelsat 6 and attached new SRM. First active dual rendezvous of two orbiting spacecraft (Endeavour and Intelsat-Vl). First deployment of a drag chute on the orbiter fleet. Payloads: Intelsat-Vl reboost mission hardware, Assembly of Station by EVA Methods (ASEM), Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG), Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) Calibration Test, Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPl).

1992 May 11 - . 20:40 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-49-1 - . Crew: Thuot; Hieb. EVA Type: Extra-Vehicular Activity. EVA Duration: 0.16 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Thuot; Hieb. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-49. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Summary: Attempted capture of Intelsat V1..

1992 May 12 - . 21:05 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-49-2 - . Crew: Thuot; Hieb. EVA Type: Extra-Vehicular Activity. EVA Duration: 0.23 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Thuot; Hieb. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-49. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Summary: Second attempted capture of Intelsat V1..

1992 May 14 - . 21:17 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-49-3 - . Crew: Thuot; Hieb; Akers. EVA Type: Extra-Vehicular Activity. EVA Duration: 0.35 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Thuot; Hieb; Akers. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-49. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Summary: Intelsat V1 finally captured in first three-person spacewalk..

1992 May 15 - .
  • EVA STS-49-4 - . Crew: Thornton; Akers. EVA Type: Extra-Vehicular Activity. EVA Duration: 0.32 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Thornton; Akers. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-49. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Summary: Tested tools and techniques for assembly of the International Space Station..

1992 May 16 - .
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