Encyclopedia Astronautica
Delta 2000



de297816.jpg
Delta 2914 no. 146
Delta 2914 no. 146 - COSPAR 1978-106
American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 2000 series used Castor 2 strap-ons together with an Extended Long Tank core equipped with the more powerful RS-27 engine. This engine was derived from surplus H-1 engines intended for the Saturn IB booster of the Apollo programme. The Delta P upper stage was built by Douglas and used surplus Apollo lunar module engines from TRW.

Payload: 724 kg (1,596 lb) to a GTO in 1985 dollars. Flyaway Unit Cost $: 28.520 million.

Stage Data - Delta 2000

  • Stage 0. 9 x Castor 2. Gross Mass: 4,424 kg (9,753 lb). Empty Mass: 695 kg (1,532 lb). Thrust (vac): 258.915 kN (58,206 lbf). Isp: 262 sec. Burn time: 37 sec. Isp(sl): 232 sec. Diameter: 0.79 m (2.59 ft). Span: 0.79 m (2.59 ft). Length: 6.04 m (19.81 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: TX-354-3. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x Delta Thor RS27. Gross Mass: 84,368 kg (185,999 lb). Empty Mass: 4,360 kg (9,610 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,030.218 kN (231,602 lbf). Isp: 296 sec. Burn time: 223 sec. Isp(sl): 262 sec. Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Span: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Length: 22.37 m (73.39 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: RS-27. Other designations: Extended Length Thor RS-27. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x Delta P. Gross Mass: 5,434 kg (11,979 lb). Empty Mass: 820 kg (1,800 lb). Thrust (vac): 41.923 kN (9,425 lbf). Isp: 301 sec. Burn time: 322 sec. Isp(sl): 0.0000 sec. Diameter: 1.38 m (4.52 ft). Span: 1.38 m (4.52 ft). Length: 5.97 m (19.58 ft). Propellants: N2O4/Aerozine-50. No Engines: 1. Engine: TR-201. Other designations: TR-201. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 3. 1 x Burner 2. Gross Mass: 774 kg (1,706 lb). Empty Mass: 116 kg (255 lb). Thrust (vac): 43.551 kN (9,791 lbf). Isp: 285 sec. Burn time: 42 sec. Isp(sl): 220 sec. Diameter: 0.66 m (2.16 ft). Span: 0.66 m (2.16 ft). Length: 0.84 m (2.75 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: Star 37. Status: Out of Production. Burner II was a launch vehicle upper stage developed by Boeing for the Air Force Space Systems Division. It was the first solid-fuel upper stage with full control and guidance capability developed for general space applications. Burner II was designed for use with the Thor booster, but was readily adapted for use on the complete range of standard launch vehicles. Its general assignment was to place small- and medium size payloads into orbit. The Burner II motor, guidance system and reaction control system were integrated to provide attitude stability and precise control of flight rate and burnout velocity for orbital injection and earth-escape missions. Boeing had delivered 8 flight vehicles under its original contract. Under terms of a follow-on contract, it built 6 additional flight models. Four Thor-Burner II combinations were launched successfully from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The third launch placed 2 unclassified satellites in Earth orbit. A SECOR satellite, built for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by the Cubic Corporation, and an Aurora satellite, developed by Rice University for the Office of Naval Research, were placed in circular orbits 3,300 km above the Earth. As integration contractor for the Air Force Space Experiment Support Program (SESP) Office, Boeing designed, built and tested the injection stage, or "payload dispenser," which carried the 2 satellites on top of a standard Burner II stage and placed them in precise orbits. The satellites were mounted on opposite sides of the injection stage, which housed a640 kgf thrust, solid-propellant rocket motor. The Burner II was used as an upper stage by NASA for deep space probes. Prime Contractor: The Boeing Company. Major Subcontractors Thiokol Chemical Corporation (solid rocket motor); Honeywell Inc. (pre-programmed inertial guidance system); Walter Kidde Co. (reaction control system).

Status: Out of production.
Gross mass: 130,392 kg (287,465 lb).
Payload: 724 kg (1,596 lb).
Height: 35.00 m (114.00 ft).
Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft).
Thrust: 2,287.50 kN (514,250 lbf).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Oscar International series of amateur radio communications satellites. Operational, first launch 1961.12.12. Launched in a variety of configurations and by many nations. More...
  • AE American earth atmosphere satellite. 5 launches, 1963.04.03 (Explorer 17) to 1975.11.20 (Explorer 55). Atmospheric research. More...
  • Nimbus American earth weather satellite. 8 launches, 1964.08.28 (Nimbus 1) to 1978.10.13 (Nimbus 7). More...
  • ITOS American earth weather satellite. 8 launches, 1970.01.23 (ITOS 1) to 1976.07.29 (NOAA 5). ITOS was the follow-on to the TIROS series of polar-orbiting US weather satellites, and marked the beginning of the use of the NOAA designator. More...
  • Landsat 1-2-3 American earth land resources satellite. 3 launches, 1972.07.23 (Landsat 1) to 1978.03.05 (Landsat 3). The first 3 Landsat missions were also known as the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) series. More...
  • HS 333 American communications satellite. 8 launches, 1972.11.10 (Anik A1) to 1979.08.10 (Westar 3). The satellites, act as space repeaters capable of receiving transmissions from earth stations and retransmitting them to other earth stations in Canada. More...
  • Skynet British military communications satellite. 2 launches, 1974.01.19 (Skynet 2A) and 1974.11.23 (Skynet 2B). More...
  • SMS American earth weather satellite. 2 launches, 1974.05.17 (SMS 1) and 1975.02.06 (SMS 2). Synchronous Meteorological Satellite. More...
  • Intasat Spanish communications technology satellite. One launch, 1974.11.15. Spanish communications satellite. More...
  • Symphonie French communications technology satellite. One launch, 1974.12.18. Experimental telecommunications satellite, constructed jointly by France and the Federal Republic of Germany. More...
  • COS European technology satellite. One launch, 1975.08.09. CERS/ESRO satellite, first European Space Agency satellite. More...
  • Spacebus 100 French communications satellite. 12 launches, 1975.08.26 (Symphonie 2) to 1994.01.24 (Eutelsat II F5). 3-axis stabilized using bipropellant thrusters (750 kg propellant - unified with apogee insertion and maneuvering propulsion) and momentum wheels. More...
  • GOES American earth weather satellite. 8 launches, 1975.10.16 (GOES 1) to 1987.02.26 (GOES 7). Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. More...
  • CTS Canadian communications satellite. One launch, 1976.01.17. Canadian Telecommunications Satellite project. Only one spacecraft launched. More...
  • Marisat American communications satellite. 3 launches, 1976.02.19 (Marisat 1) to 1976.10.14 (Marisat 3). Maritime communications. More...
  • NATO 3 British military communications satellite. 4 launches, 1976.04.22 (NATO 3A) to 1984.11.14 (NATO 3D). Military communications. More...
  • LAGEOS American earth geodetic satellite. 2 launches, 1976.05.04 (Lageos) and 1992.10.22 (Lageos 2). The LAGEOS satellites were passive vehicles covered with retroreflectors designed to reflect laser beams transmitted from ground stations. More...
  • ESA-Geos European earth magnetosphere satellite. 2 launches, 1977.04.20 (ESA-Geos 1) and 1978.07.14 (ESA-Geos 2). Magnetospheric research. European Space Agency satellite. More...
  • GMS Japanese earth weather satellite. 5 launches, 1977.07.14 (Himawari 1) to 1995.03.18 (Himawari 5). The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite series were spin-stabilized satellites. More...
  • Sirio Italian communications technology satellite. 2 launches, 1977.08.25 (Sirio 1) and 1982.09.09 (Sirio 2). SIRIO was a spin stabilized geostationary experimental communications satellite with a nominal life of two years. More...
  • ISEE American earth magnetosphere satellite. 3 launches, 1977.10.22 (ISEE 1) to 1978.08.12 (ISEE 3). These Explorer-class heliocentric spacecraft were part of the mother/daughter/heliocentric mission (ISEE 1, 2, and 3). More...
  • Meteosat European earth weather satellite. 7 launches, 1977.11.23 (Meteosat 1) to 1997.09.02 (Meteosat 7). More...
  • CS-1 Japanese communications satellite. One launch, 1977.12.15, Sakura. This Medium-capacity Communications Satellite for Experimental Purposes was a spin stabilized geostationary communications satellite. More...
  • IUE American ultraviolet astronomy satellite. One launch, 1978.01.26. More...
  • PIX American technology satellite. One launch, 1978.03.05. Plasma Interaction Experiment. More...
  • Yuri Japanese communications technology satellite. One launch, 1978.04.07. Medium-scale broadcasting satellite for experimental purposes. More...
  • CAMEO American earth magnetosphere satellite. One launch, 1978.10.13. Released barium cloud. More...
  • SCATHA American communications technology satellite. One launch, 1979.01.30. More...
  • SME American solar satellite. One launch, 1981.10.06. The Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite was developed to investigate the processes that create and destroy ozone in the Earth's upper atmosphere. More...
  • MicroSat SSTL British technology satellite. 3 launches, 1981.10.06 (CERISE) to 1990.01.22 (Oscar 14). Original version of the Surrey Microsat bus. More...

Associated Engines
  • RS-27 Rocketdyne Lox/Kerosene rocket engine. 1023 kN. Out of production. Isp=295s. Consisted of RS2701A/B main engine, and twin LR101-NA-11 verniers. Introduced in 1974 on the McDonnell Douglas' Delta 2000 series launcher; replaced the MB-3. First flight 1972. More...
  • Star 37 Thiokol solid rocket engine. 43.5 kN. Total impulse 161,512 kgf-sec. Motor propellant mass fraction 0.899. Isp=260s. First flight 1963. More...
  • TR-201 TRW N2O4/Aerozine-50 rocket engine. 41.9 kN. Apollo lunar module ascent stage engines. Surplus engines used on Delta P stage. Isp=301s. First flight 1972. More...

See also
  • Delta The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Development began in 1955 and it continued in service in the 21st Century despite numerous candidate replacements. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Douglas American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Boeing Huntington Beach, Huntington Beach, CA, USA. More...

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