Encyclopedia Astronautica
Delta 3000



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Delta 3924 no. 167
Delta 3924 no. 167 - COSPAR 1983-030
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Delta 3910 no. 151
Delta 3910 no. 151 - COSPAR 1980-014
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Delta 3925
Credit: Boeing
American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 3000 series upgraded the boosters to Castor 4 solid propellant strap-ons, while retaining the Extended Long Tank core with RS-27 engine. The 3910 series used the TRW Lunar Module engine in the second stage, while the 3920 series reintroduced the Aerojet AJ110 Delta engine.

During the production run of the Delta 3000 series, production gradually transitioned from the 3910 model (with the TRW engine) to the 3920 model (with the Aerojet engine).

Payload: 954 kg (2,103 lb) to a GTO. Launch Price $: 16.300 million in 1977 dollars.

Stage Data - Delta 3000

  • Stage 0. 9 x Castor 4. Gross Mass: 10,534 kg (23,223 lb). Empty Mass: 1,269 kg (2,797 lb). Thrust (vac): 407.211 kN (91,545 lbf). Isp: 261 sec. Burn time: 54 sec. Isp(sl): 228 sec. Diameter: 1.02 m (3.34 ft). Span: 1.02 m (3.34 ft). Length: 9.07 m (29.75 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: Castor 4. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x Delta Thor RS27. Gross Mass: 84,368 kg (185,999 lb). Empty Mass: 4,360 kg (9,610 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,030.218 kN (231,602 lbf). Isp: 296 sec. Burn time: 223 sec. Isp(sl): 262 sec. Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Span: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Length: 22.37 m (73.39 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: RS-27. Other designations: Extended Length Thor RS-27. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x Delta P. Gross Mass: 5,434 kg (11,979 lb). Empty Mass: 820 kg (1,800 lb). Thrust (vac): 41.923 kN (9,425 lbf). Isp: 301 sec. Burn time: 322 sec. Isp(sl): 0.0000 sec. Diameter: 1.38 m (4.52 ft). Span: 1.38 m (4.52 ft). Length: 5.97 m (19.58 ft). Propellants: N2O4/Aerozine-50. No Engines: 1. Engine: TR-201. Other designations: TR-201. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 3. 1 x Burner 2. Gross Mass: 774 kg (1,706 lb). Empty Mass: 116 kg (255 lb). Thrust (vac): 43.551 kN (9,791 lbf). Isp: 285 sec. Burn time: 42 sec. Isp(sl): 220 sec. Diameter: 0.66 m (2.16 ft). Span: 0.66 m (2.16 ft). Length: 0.84 m (2.75 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: Star 37. Status: Out of Production. Burner II was a launch vehicle upper stage developed by Boeing for the Air Force Space Systems Division. It was the first solid-fuel upper stage with full control and guidance capability developed for general space applications. Burner II was designed for use with the Thor booster, but was readily adapted for use on the complete range of standard launch vehicles. Its general assignment was to place small- and medium size payloads into orbit. The Burner II motor, guidance system and reaction control system were integrated to provide attitude stability and precise control of flight rate and burnout velocity for orbital injection and earth-escape missions. Boeing had delivered 8 flight vehicles under its original contract. Under terms of a follow-on contract, it built 6 additional flight models. Four Thor-Burner II combinations were launched successfully from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The third launch placed 2 unclassified satellites in Earth orbit. A SECOR satellite, built for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by the Cubic Corporation, and an Aurora satellite, developed by Rice University for the Office of Naval Research, were placed in circular orbits 3,300 km above the Earth. As integration contractor for the Air Force Space Experiment Support Program (SESP) Office, Boeing designed, built and tested the injection stage, or "payload dispenser," which carried the 2 satellites on top of a standard Burner II stage and placed them in precise orbits. The satellites were mounted on opposite sides of the injection stage, which housed a640 kgf thrust, solid-propellant rocket motor. The Burner II was used as an upper stage by NASA for deep space probes. Prime Contractor: The Boeing Company. Major Subcontractors Thiokol Chemical Corporation (solid rocket motor); Honeywell Inc. (pre-programmed inertial guidance system); Walter Kidde Co. (reaction control system).

Status: Out of production.
Gross mass: 185,382 kg (408,697 lb).
Payload: 954 kg (2,103 lb).
Height: 35.00 m (114.00 ft).
Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft).
Thrust: 3,046.20 kN (684,813 lbf).

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • GOES American earth weather satellite. 8 launches, 1975.10.16 (GOES 1) to 1987.02.26 (GOES 7). Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. More...
  • AS 1000 American communications satellite. 3 launches, 1975.12.13 (Satcom 1) to 1979.12.07 (RCA Satcom 3). More...
  • NATO 3 British military communications satellite. 4 launches, 1976.04.22 (NATO 3A) to 1984.11.14 (NATO 3D). Military communications. More...
  • ECS/OTS European communications satellite. 20 launches, 1977.09.13 (OTS 1) to 2001.02.07 (Skynet 4F). More...
  • Anik Canadian communications satellite. 2 launches, 1978.12.15 (Anik B1 (Telesat 4)) and (DRIMS). Function - telecommunications. Operating entity - Telesat Canada. More...
  • SMM American solar satellite. One launch, 1980.02.14. The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) was intended primarily to study solar flares and related phenomena. More...
  • HS 376 American communications satellite. 56 launches, 1980.11.15 (SBS 1) to 2003.09.27 (E-Bird). Mass 654 kg at beginning-of-life in geosynchronous orbit. Spin stabilized at 50 rpm by 4 hydrazine thrusters with 136 kg propellant. More...
  • Insat 1 Indian communications satellite. 5 launches, 1981.06.19 (Apple) to 1990.06.12 (Insat-1D; Insat 1D). Experimental communications satellite. More...
  • Dynamics Explorer American earth magnetosphere satellite. 2 launches, 1981.08.03 (Dynamics Explorer 1) and (Dynamics Explorer 2). Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space. More...
  • MicroSat SSTL British technology satellite. 3 launches, 1981.10.06 (CERISE) to 1990.01.22 (Oscar 14). Original version of the Surrey Microsat bus. More...
  • AS 3000 American communications satellite. 25 launches, 1981.11.20 (RCA Satcom 4; RCA Satcom 3R) to 1996.01.14 (Koreasat 2). More...
  • Landsat 4-5 American earth land resources satellite. 2 launches, 1982.07.16 (Landsat 4) to 1984.03.01 (Landsat 5). More...
  • IRAS American infrared astronomy satellite. 2 launches, 1983.01.26 (IRAS) and (PIX 2). All-sky survey of astronomical IR bodies. More...
  • Exosat European x-ray astronomy satellite. One launch, 1983.05.26. EXOSAT was a space research satellite of the European Space Agency. More...
  • AMPTE American earth magnetosphere satellite. 4 launches, 1984.08.16 (CCE-1) to (Solar Cell Experiment). Charge Composition Explorer; detected tracer ions released into magnetosphere by IRM. More...
  • SDI American military strategic defense satellite. 18 launches, 1986.09.05 (USA 19) to 1989.03.24 (USA 36). SDIO sensor tests. More...

Associated Engines
  • AJ10-118K Aerojet N2O4/Aerozine-50 rocket engine. 43.4 kN. Isp=321s. Pressure-fed engine, optimized for altitude operation, used in Delta K stage from 1989. Not regeneratively cooled; used a rubber modified silica phenolic ablative at the combustion flame front. More...
  • RS-27 Rocketdyne Lox/Kerosene rocket engine. 1023 kN. Out of production. Isp=295s. Consisted of RS2701A/B main engine, and twin LR101-NA-11 verniers. Introduced in 1974 on the McDonnell Douglas' Delta 2000 series launcher; replaced the MB-3. First flight 1972. More...
  • Star 37 Thiokol solid rocket engine. 43.5 kN. Total impulse 161,512 kgf-sec. Motor propellant mass fraction 0.899. Isp=260s. First flight 1963. More...
  • TR-201 TRW N2O4/Aerozine-50 rocket engine. 41.9 kN. Apollo lunar module ascent stage engines. Surplus engines used on Delta P stage. Isp=301s. First flight 1972. More...

See also
  • Delta The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Development began in 1955 and it continued in service in the 21st Century despite numerous candidate replacements. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Douglas American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Boeing Huntington Beach, Huntington Beach, CA, USA. More...

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