Encyclopedia Astronautica
Delta G



delg6614.jpg
Delta G no. 43
Delta G no. 43 - COSPAR 1966-114
American orbital launch vehicle. Three stage vehicle consisting of 3 x Castor + 1 x Thor DSV-2C + 1 x Delta E

Flyaway Unit Cost $: 10.150 million in 1985 dollars.

Stage Data - Delta G

  • Stage 0. 3 x Castor 1. Gross Mass: 3,852 kg (8,492 lb). Empty Mass: 535 kg (1,179 lb). Thrust (vac): 286.001 kN (64,296 lbf). Isp: 247 sec. Burn time: 27 sec. Isp(sl): 232 sec. Diameter: 0.79 m (2.59 ft). Span: 0.79 m (2.59 ft). Length: 5.92 m (19.42 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: M33-20-4. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x Delta Thor TA. Gross Mass: 49,442 kg (109,000 lb). Empty Mass: 3,175 kg (6,999 lb). Thrust (vac): 866.710 kN (194,844 lbf). Isp: 290 sec. Burn time: 150 sec. Isp(sl): 256 sec. Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Span: 2.44 m (8.00 ft). Length: 18.41 m (60.40 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: MB-3-3. Other designations: Thrust Augmented Thor. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x Delta E. Gross Mass: 6,009 kg (13,247 lb). Empty Mass: 785 kg (1,730 lb). Thrust (vac): 35.098 kN (7,890 lbf). Isp: 278 sec. Burn time: 400 sec. Isp(sl): 0.0000 sec. Diameter: 1.40 m (4.50 ft). Span: 1.40 m (4.50 ft). Length: 6.28 m (20.60 ft). Propellants: Nitric acid/UDMH. No Engines: 1. Engine: AJ10-118E. Status: Out of Production.

AKA: Thor Delta G; Thrust Augmented Thor.
Status: Retired 1967.
Gross mass: 55,451 kg (122,248 lb).
Height: 30.00 m (98.00 ft).
Diameter: 2.44 m (8.00 ft).
Thrust: 765.10 kN (172,001 lbf).
Apogee: 400 km (240 mi).
First Launch: 1966.12.14.
Last Launch: 1967.09.07.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Biosatellite American biology satellite. 3 launches, 1966.12.14 (Biosatellite 1) to 1969.06.29 (Biosatellite 3). Biosatellite was a NASA spacecraft designed in the early 1960's to study the effects of the space environment on living organisms in missions. More...

Associated Engines
  • AJ10-118E Aerojet Nitric acid/UDMH rocket engine. 35.1 kN. Isp=278s. Used on Delta E, Delta G, Delta J, Delta L, Delta M, Delta N upper stages. First flight 1965. More...
  • AJ10-118G Aerojet Nitric acid/UDMH rocket engine. 43.414 kN. Delta G. Isp=314s. More...
  • MB-3-3 Rocketdyne Lox/Kerosene rocket engine. 866.7 kN. Out of Production. License built in Japan for H-1. Isp=290s. First flight 1964. More...

See also
  • Delta The Delta launch vehicle was America's longest-lived, most reliable, and lowest-cost space launch vehicle. Development began in 1955 and it continued in service in the 21st Century despite numerous candidate replacements. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Douglas American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Boeing Huntington Beach, Huntington Beach, CA, USA. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC17B Delta launch complex. Part of a dual launch pad complex built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Upgraded over the decades for use with Thor, Delta, Delta II, and Delta III launch vehicles, it remained in use for over half a century. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC17A Delta launch complex. Part of a dual launch pad complex built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Pad 17A supported Thor, Delta, and Delta II launches into the 21st Century. More...

Associated Stages
  • Castor 1 Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 3,852/535 kg. Thrust 286.00 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 247 seconds. More...
  • Delta E Nitric acid/UDMH propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 6,009/785 kg. Thrust 35.10 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 278 seconds. More...
  • Delta Thor TA Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 49,442/3,175 kg. Thrust 866.71 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 290 seconds. More...

Delta G Chronology


1966 December 14 - . 19:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta G. LV Configuration: Thor Delta G 471/D43.
  • Biosatellite 1 - . Payload: Biosat 1. Mass: 425 kg (936 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Ames. Class: Biology. Type: Biology satellite. Spacecraft: Biosatellite. Decay Date: 1967-02-15 . USAF Sat Cat: 2631 . COSPAR: 1966-114C. Apogee: 309 km (192 mi). Perigee: 295 km (183 mi). Inclination: 33.5000 deg. Period: 90.40 min. Reentry into the Earth's atmosphere was not achieved because the retrorocket failed to ignite. The biosatellite was never recovered. Although the scientific objectives of the mission were not accomplished, the Biosatellite I experience provided technical confidence in the program because of excellent performance in most other areas.

1967 September 7 - . 22:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta G. LV Configuration: Thor Delta G 475/D51.
  • Biosatellite 2 - . Payload: Biosat 2. Mass: 507 kg (1,117 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Ames. Class: Biology. Type: Biology satellite. Spacecraft: Biosatellite. Decay Date: 1967-09-15 . USAF Sat Cat: 2935 . COSPAR: 1967-083A. Apogee: 318 km (197 mi). Perigee: 297 km (184 mi). Inclination: 33.5000 deg. Period: 90.70 min. Biological capsule recovered. The scientific payload, consisting of 13 select biology and radiation experiments, was exposed to microgravity during 45 hours of Earth-orbital flight. Experimental biology packages on the spacecraft contained a variety of specimens, including insects, frog eggs, microorganisms and plants. The planned three-day mission was recalled early because of the threat of a tropical storm in the recovery area, and because of a communication problem between the spacecraft and the tracking systems. The primary objective of the Biosatellite II mission was to determine if organisms were more, or less, sensitive to ionizing radiation in microgravity than on Earth. To study this question, an artificial source of radiation was supplied to a group of experiments mounted in the forward part of the spacecraft.

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use