Encyclopedia Astronautica
H-2



h294007.jpg
H-2
H-2 - COSPAR 1994-007
h2lifto.jpg
H-2 Liftoff
Credit: NASDA
h2cutway.jpg
H-2 Cutaway view
Credit: NASDA
Heavy lift Japanese indigenous launch vehicle. The original H-2 version was cancelled due to high costs and poor reliability and replaced by the substantially redesigned H-2A.

3 stage vehicle consisted of 2 x H-II SRB + 1 x H-II stage 1 + 1 x H-II stage 2

LEO Payload: 10,060 kg (22,170 lb) to a 200 km orbit at 30.40 degrees. Payload: 3,930 kg (8,660 lb) to a GTO. Failures: 3. Success Rate: 86.36%. First Fail Date: 1994-08-28. Last Fail Date: 2003-11-29. Launch data is: continuing. Development Cost $: 2,300.000 million. Launch Price $: 190.000 million in 1994 dollars in 1998 dollars.

Stage Data - H-2

  • Stage 0. 2 x H-2-0. Gross Mass: 70,400 kg (155,200 lb). Empty Mass: 11,250 kg (24,800 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,539.997 kN (346,205 lbf). Isp: 273 sec. Burn time: 94 sec. Isp(sl): 237 sec. Diameter: 1.81 m (5.93 ft). Span: 1.81 m (5.93 ft). Length: 23.36 m (76.64 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Engine: H-2-0. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x H-2-1. Gross Mass: 98,100 kg (216,200 lb). Empty Mass: 11,900 kg (26,200 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,077.996 kN (242,343 lbf). Isp: 446 sec. Burn time: 346 sec. Isp(sl): 349 sec. Diameter: 4.00 m (13.10 ft). Span: 4.00 m (13.10 ft). Length: 28.00 m (91.00 ft). Propellants: Lox/LH2. No Engines: 1. Engine: LE-7. Other designations: LE-7. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x H-2-2. Gross Mass: 16,700 kg (36,800 lb). Empty Mass: 2,700 kg (5,900 lb). Thrust (vac): 121.500 kN (27,314 lbf). Isp: 452 sec. Burn time: 600 sec. Diameter: 4.00 m (13.10 ft). Span: 4.00 m (13.10 ft). Length: 10.60 m (34.70 ft). Propellants: Lox/LH2. No Engines: 1. Engine: LE-5A. Other designations: LE-5EC. Status: In Production.

AKA: H-II.
Status: Active.
Gross mass: 260,000 kg (570,000 lb).
Payload: 10,060 kg (22,170 lb).
Height: 49.00 m (160.00 ft).
Diameter: 4.00 m (13.10 ft).
Thrust: 3,970.00 kN (892,490 lbf).
Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).
First Launch: 1994.02.03.
Last Launch: 2009.01.23.
Number: 20 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • ETS Japanese technology satellite. 7 launches, 1975.09.09 (Kiku 1) to 2006.12.16 (Kiku 8). More...
  • GMS Japanese earth weather satellite. 5 launches, 1977.07.14 (Himawari 1) to 1995.03.18 (Himawari 5). The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite series were spin-stabilized satellites. More...
  • HTV Japanese unmanned spacecraft designed for launch by the H-IIB launch vehicle for International Space Station resupply. The HTV carried International Standard Payload Racks, and was docked using the ISS robot arm after rendezvous with the station. First launched 2009.09.10. More...
  • FS-1300 American communications satellite bus. Operational, first launch 1989.06.05. More...
  • OREX Japanese re-entry vehicle technology satellite. One launch, 1994.02.03. NASDA ballistic capsule used to test materials and acquire data related to atmospheric re-entry for use in design of Japanese HOPE spaceplane. Launch vehicle H-2. More...
  • VEP Japanese technology satellite. 2 launches, 1994.02.03 (VEP) and 2001.08.29 (VEP-2). Monitored H-2 launch vehicle performance. National name MYOJO. More...
  • SFU Japanese materials science satellite. One launch, 1995.03.18. Carried materials, astronomy, biological experiments; released and later retrieved by space shuttle. More...
  • Fuji Japanese amateur radio communications satellite. One launch, 1996.08.17, JAS-2. Japanese amateur radio satellite. More...
  • ADEOS Japanese earth atmosphere satellite. 2 launches, 1996.08.17 (ADEOS) and 2002.12.14 (Adeos 2). The polar orbiting ADEOS spacecraft was to perform Earth, atmospheric, and oceanographic remote sensing. More...
  • TRMM American earth atmosphere satellite. One launch, 1997.11.27. TRMM was an international mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall. More...
  • ETS-7 Target Japanese rendezvous technology satellite. One launch, 1997.11.27, Orihime. Attached to Hikoboshi. Docking target for ETS-7. More...
  • ETS-7 Japanese rendezvous technology satellite. One launch, 1997.11.27, Hikoboshi. Technology satellite, to accomplish remote automatic rendezvous and docking. More...
  • Kakehashi Japanese communications satellite. One launch, 1998.02.21. Name means 'Bridge', was called Communications and Broadcasting Experimental Test Satellite (COMETS) before launch. It contained Ka-band communications and inter-satellite data relay payloads. More...
  • LRE Japanese earth geodetic satellite. One launch, 2001.08.29. The 87 kg Laser Ranging Experiment was a passive mirror ball of diameter 51 cm and carried 24 glass sheets and 126 prisms on its surface. More...
  • DASH 2002 Japanese re-entry vehicle technology satellite. One launch, 2002.02.04, DASH. DASH (Demonstrator of Atmospheric Reentry System and Hypervelocity) was a small secondary payload built by ISAS, the scientific space agency which was to merge with NASDA. More...
  • MDS Japanese technology satellite. One launch, 2002.02.04. MDS (Mission Demonstration Satellite) was a technology demonstrator to flight-qualify commercial subsystems. More...
  • DRTS Japanese geostationary communications satellite. One launch, 2002.09.10. DRTS (Data Relay Transponder Satellite) relayed images and data procured by the ADEOS 2 and ALOS satellites, and the KIBO module on ISS. More...
  • USERS Japanese materials science satellite. One launch, 2002.09.10. USERS (Unmanned Space Experiment Recovery System) was a Japanese microgravity experimental satellite. More...
  • FedSat Australian communications satellite. One launch, 2002.12.14. FedSat contained high-tech communication, space science, navigation and computing equipment and was intended to help bring broadband Internet services to remote parts of Australia. More...
  • Mu-Labsat Japanese technology satellite. One launch, 2002.12.14. Technology satellite, which released two tiny subsatellites in an experiment to test an onboard tracking imager for inspector satellites. More...
  • WEOS Kanta-Kun Japanese earth land resources satellite. One launch, 2002.12.14. Ecology satellite. More...
  • IGS Japanese military surveillance satellite. Operational, first launched 2003.03.28. Japan's first military reconnaissance satellites, launched in optical and radar versions. More...
  • Daichi Japanese civilian surveillance radar satellite. One launch, 2006.01.24. Advanced Land Observing Satellite, which carried an L-band synthetic aperture radar, an optical 2. More...
  • DS2000 Japanese communications satellite bus. Operational, first launch 2006.02.18. Mitsubishi Electric developed the DS2000 standard satellite platform based on a design originally created for the DRTS and ETS-8 platforms for NASDA. More...
  • Kizuna Japanese communications satellite. One launch, 2008.02.23. More...
  • Ibuki Japanese earth atmosphere satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite, renamed Ibuki after launch. More...
  • PRISM Japanese military surveillance radar satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Remote sensing picosatellite built by the University of Tokyo, with a 10-cm aperture Earth imager on a 1-meter deployable boom. More...
  • Kukai Japanese tether technology satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Also named STARS, a Kagawa University picosatellite demonstrating a tethered space robot. It consisted of two tethered box-shaped packages, dubbed Ku and Kai. More...
  • SpriteSat Japanese science. One launch, 2009.01.23. Microsatellite stabilized by a gravity gradient boom to study atmospheric sprites, built by by Tohoku University, Sendai. More...
  • Kagayaki Japanese technology satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Technology satellite built by Sorun Corporation, Tokyo, with several technology payloads. More...
  • JAXA SDS Japanese technology satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23, SDS-1. JAXA Small Demonstration Satellite, a microsatellite with a camera, GPS receiver and sun sensor. More...
  • KKS Japanese military surveillance radar satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Picosatellite built by Kouku-kosen, the Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautical Engineering, carrying an Earth imager. More...
  • SOHLA Japanese military surveillance radar satellite. One launch, 2009.01.23. Satellite built by the Space Oriented Higashi-osaka Leading Association, Osaka, carrying a cloud cover imager. More...

Associated Engines
  • H-2-0 Nissan solid rocket engine. 1540 kN. Isp=273s. Used as strap-on booster on H-2, first stage on J-1. First flight 1994. More...
  • LE-5A Mitsubishi lox/lh2 rocket engine. 121.5 kN. Isp=452s. Used on H-2 launch vehicle. First flight 1994. More...
  • LE-7 Mitsubishi lox/lh2 rocket engine for H-2 upper stage. 1078 kN. Staged combustion turbopump. No throttle capability. Isp=446s. First flight 1994. More...

See also
  • H-2 Heavy lift Japanese indigenous launch vehicle. The original H-2 version was cancelled due to high costs and poor reliability and replaced by the substantially redesigned H-2A.

    3 stage vehicle consisted of 2 x H-II SRB + 1 x H-II stage 1 + 1 x H-II stage 2 More...


Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Mitsubishi Japanese manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Mitsubishi Electric Corp, Japan. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • JPL Mission and Spacecraft Library, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1997. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Isakowitz, Steven J,, International Reference to Space Launch Systems Second Edition, AIAA, Washington DC, 1991 (succeeded by 2000 edition).
  • Wilson, Andrew, editor,, Jane's/Interavia Space Directory, Jane's Information Group, Coulsdon, Surrey, 1992 et al.
  • NASA GSFC Orbital Parameters,
  • National Space Science Center Planetary Page, As of 19 February 1999.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Isakowitz, Steven J, Hopkins, Joshua B, and Hopkins, Joseph P, International Reference to Space Launch Systems, AIAA, Washington DC, 2004.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

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