Encyclopedia Astronautica
KSR-I



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KSR-I
Credit: © Mark Wade
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KSR-I
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S Korean LVs
South Korean indigneous rockets.
Credit: © Mark Wade
First South Korean sounding rocket, an unguided single solid propellant stage vehicle. Development began in 1990 and the rocket was flown two times in 1993.

Development began in 1990, which was the first domestic single-stage unguided solid-propellant scientific rocket with a length of 6.7m, a diameter of 0.42m and lift-off weight of 1.2tons. KSR-I was launched on June 4 and September 1, 1993, respectively carrying an ultraviolet radiometer with the mission to measure the vertical ozone distribution in the stratosphere over the Korean peninsular. Temperature, acceleration and the other parameters were also measured to examine the performance of the rocket throughout the test flights. KSR-I had the payload capacity of 150kg and could reach the altitude of 75km.

Payload: 150 kg (330 lb) to a 75 km altitude.

Stage Data - KSR-I

  • Stage 1. 1 x KSR-1. Gross Mass: 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). Empty Mass: 100 kg (220 lb). Thrust (vac): 86.200 kN (19,379 lbf). Isp: 250 sec. Burn time: 25 sec. Isp(sl): 220 sec. Diameter: 0.42 m (1.37 ft). Span: 0.42 m (1.37 ft). Length: 4.70 m (15.40 ft). Propellants: Solid. No Engines: 1. Status: Hardware 2002. Comments: All values except thrust estimated.

Status: Retired 1993.
Gross mass: 1,200 kg (2,600 lb).
Payload: 150 kg (330 lb).
Height: 6.70 m (21.90 ft).
Diameter: 0.42 m (1.37 ft).
Thrust: 86.00 kN (19,333 lbf).
Apogee: 75 km (46 mi).
First Launch: 1993.06.04.
Last Launch: 1993.09.01.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
  • Korea South South Korea became familiar with large-scale rocketry through maintenance and modification activities on American-supplied Honest John and Nike Hercules tactical missiles. By the 1990's Korea had developed an independent capability to manufacture solid propellant rocket motors of up to one tonne mass. In 1990 KARI was funded to build the first indigenous sounding rockets, flown as the KSR-I and KSR-II. In December 1997 KARI was allowed to proceed with development of liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket motor for an orbital launcher, but this was abandoned when the South Korean government decided it wanted to be among the top ten spacefaring nations by 2015. The existing program was too limited in growth potential to allow that. Therefore it was decided to leapfrog the technology by contracting with Russian companies. First launch of the KSLV-I launch vehicle from the new space centre took place in 2010. More...

See also
  • KSR South Korean indigenous sounding and test rocket family, using solid rocket motors and a test vehicle with a liquid oxygen/kerosene motor. Further development of the latter into the KSLV satellite launch vehicle was abandoned in 2005 in favor of licensed Russian technology. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • KARI South Korean agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Korea South. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Anhueng South Korean sounding rocket launch site, used from June 1993, known to have been used for 5 launches from 1993 to 2002, reaching up to 150 kilometers altitude. More...

Associated Stages
  • KSR-1 Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 1,000/100 kg. Thrust 86.20 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 250 seconds. All values except thrust estimated. More...

KSR-I Chronology


1993 June 4 - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-I. LV Configuration: KSR-I-1.
  • Ozone profile mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 39 km (24 mi). Summary: Ultraviolet radiometer to measure vertical ozone distribution in the stratosphere over the Korean peninsula. Rocket performance also monitored..

1993 September 1 - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-I. LV Configuration: KSR-I-2.
  • Ozone profile mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 49 km (30 mi). Summary: Ultraviolet radiometer to measure vertical ozone distribution in the stratosphere over the Korean peninsula. Rocket performance also monitored..

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