Encyclopedia Astronautica
Chelomei


Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Chelomei Design Bureau, Reutov, Russia.

Controversially we have combined together several industrial enterprises and design bureaux as 'Chelomei' that in the post-Soviet Union period were exploiting products developed under his leadership. Due to Chelomei's rapid acquisition and absorption of other design bureaux during his boom years (1958-1965), followed by a spin-off of those same enterprises after he fell from grace with Khrushchev's overthrow, the picture is very complicated.

The core enterprise was founded as OKB-52 (Experimental Design Bureau) in 1954 and located in Reutov, a suburb of Moscow at the northeast corner of the ring road. This was redesignated TsKBM (Central Design Bureau for Machine Building) in 1965, and then NPO Mashinostroyenia (Scientific Production Organization for Machine Building) in 1976. It retained design responsibility throughout its life for the Chelomei ballistic and cruise missiles, the Proton launch vehicle, and the Almaz and TKS military space stations.

In the process of expansion and collapse, Chelomei's bureau acquired, then lost the following subsidiaries:

  • Filial 1 was created in October 1960 when Chelomei absorbed Myasishchev's OKB-23, located in Moscow. In 1976 it was acquired by Glushko's NPO Energia and became the KB Salyut design bureau, devoting itself primarily to development of modules for the Mir space station. In 1985 it became the independent NPOEM (NPO for Experimental Machine Building) to devote itself fully to Star Wars projects. Finally in 1994 it jointed again with Khrunichev GKNPTs (see next entry) to expedite international marketing of the Proton launch vehicle and International Space Station modules. It acquired design responsibility for Almaz and TKS derived space station modules for the Mir and International Space Stations from about 1980. It also designed the Polyus space battle station for launch by the Energia booster.

  • Filial 2 was originated in 1958 when Chelomei acquired NII-642 (scientific research institute). This filial, devoted primarily to development of containerized launch systems and silos for Chelomei's missiles, remained part of the core Chelomei enterprise until 1990. It was then spun off as the independent NPO Vympel.

  • At the time of taking in Myasishchev's design bureau, the Khrunichev factory, previously occupied with manufacture of Myasishchev bombers, became a production facility for OKB-52. It was separated again in 1965 and became an independent production facility reporting directly to the Ministry of General Machine Building (MOM). In 1994 it was reunited with Chelomei's Filial 1 into the Khrunichev GKNPTs (State Space Science and Production Center). Nevertheless throughout the period it was involved primarily with production of Chelomei products (UR-100 ICBM's and follow-ons; Proton launch vehicles; Almaz and TKS-derived space stations).

  • In December 1962, Lavochkin's OKB-301 became a part of Chelomei and was evidently incorporated into Filial 2. In 1965 it was spun off again and assigned future development and manufacture of lunar and planetary probes for Korolev.

  • The Tsybin bureau was closed down and transferred to the Myasishchev bureau in October 1959. When the Myasishchev bureau was in turn closed and the staff transferred to Filial 1 of Chelomei's OKB-52 bureau in 1960. Chelomei stopped work on Tsybin's RSR/R-020 trisonic aircraft in April 1961.

AKA: V N Chelomei; OKB-52; NPO Mashinostroyeniya; GKNPTs Khrunichev.
Location: Reutov.

More... - Chronology...


Associated People
  • Chelomei Chelomei, Vladimir Nikolayevich (1914-1984) Soviet Chief Designer 1955-1984 of OKB-52. Leading designer of cruise missiles and ICBMs. Fought for lead role in space launchers and manned spacecraft. Led work on UR-100, UR-200 ICBM's, Proton LV, Raketoplan, Almaz, TKS manned spacecraft. More...
  • Yefremov Yefremov, Gerbert Aleksandrovich (1933-) Russian engineer. Chief Designer, Chelomei design bureau, 1971-2000 More...
  • Grechanik Grechanik, Aleksei Anatoliyevich (1939-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1978-1987. Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB. Trained for a flight to the Almaz space station. Engineer at the Kosmos Pavillon in Moscow. More...
  • Makrushin Makrushin, Valeri Grigoryevich (1940-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1972-1987. Studied from 1957 to 1963 at Leningrad Institute of Aircraft Design (LIAP). Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB. Returned to NPO Mashinostroenniye. More...
  • Yuyukov Yuyukov, Dmitri Andreyevich (1941-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1973-1987. Graduated from MAI, 1965 Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB. Trained for a TKS flight to the Almaz military space station. Sector Head, NPO Mashinostroyeniye. From worked at GKNPTs Khrunishchev. More...
  • Romanov Romanov, Valeri Aleksandrovich (1946-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1978-1987. Graduated from Bauman-Higher School, Moscow, 1970 Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB. Worked with NPO Salyut. More...
  • Khatulev Khatulev, Vladimir Aleksandrovich (1947-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1973-1980. Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB More...
  • Gevorkyan Gevorkyan, Vladimir Mkrtychovich (1952-2008) Armenian-Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1978-1987. Graduated from Bauman Technical Higher School, Moscow, 1975 Civilian Engineer, Chelomei OKB. From 1991 General Director of Science Corporation "Terra". More...
  • Moshchenko Moshchenko, Sergey Ivanovich (1954-) Russian engineer cosmonaut, 1996-2009. More...

Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Kosmoplan Russian Mars orbiter. Cancelled 1965. Beginning in the late 1950's, Chelomei began studying use of his encapsulated cruise missile technology for spacecraft. A whole family of unmanned spacecraft, dubbed Kosmoplans, would be built using modular elements. More...
  • Raketoplan Russian manned spaceplane. Developed from 1959, including suborbital hardware tests, before cancellation in 1964. More...
  • LK-1 Russian manned lunar flyby spacecraft. Cancelled 1965. The LK-1 was the spacecraft designed by Chelomei for the original Soviet manned lunar flyby project. More...
  • LK-700 Russian manned lunar lander. Chelomei's direct-landing alternative to Korolev's L3 manned lunar landing design. Developed at a low level 1964 to 1974, reaching mockup and component test stage. More...
  • Polyot Russian military anti-satellite system. 2 launches, 1963.11.01 (Polet 1; Polyot 1) to 1964.04.12 (Polet 2; Polyot 2). First prototype model of Chelomei's ASAT, used in an interceptor control and propulsion test. More...
  • TGR Russian military surveillance satellite. Study 1963. Two new directions were pursued in the Soviet Union for space optical reconnaissance systems in the mid-1960's: automated systems with television transmission of pictures, and manned systems. More...
  • Almaz APOS Russian manned space station. Cancelled 1966. The initial Almaz program planned in 1965 consisted of two phases. More...
  • KLE Complex Lunar Expedition Russian manned lunar base. Chelomei's design for a lunar base, studied 1964 to 1974 as a UR-700-launched predecessor or alternative to Barmin's DLB. More...
  • N-4 Russian cosmic ray astronomy satellite. 4 launches, 1965.07.16 (Proton 1) to 1966.07.06 (Proton 3). Physics experiments. Space station "Proton 1". Investigation of ultra-high-energy cosmic particles. More...
  • IS-A Russian military anti-satellite system. 22 launches, 1967.10.27 (Cosmos 185) to 1982.06.18 (Cosmos 1379). First operational ASAT. Tested in 1967-1971 and deployed through the late 1970's. Design as revised by Yangel and Korolev from Chelomei's original. More...
  • IS-P Russian military anti-satellite system target satellite. 4 launches, 1968.04.24 (Cosmos 217) to 1970.10.20 (Cosmos 373). ASAT Target, launched by R-36. Evidently a derivative of the first IS-A ASAT itself. More...
  • N-6 Russian cosmic ray astronomy satellite. One launch, 1968.11.16, Proton 4. Cosmic ray measurements. Study of the nature of high and ultra-high energy cosmic rays and their interaction with atomic nuclei. Mass announced at time of launch 17,000 kg. More...
  • Lunar Orbit OPS Russian manned lunar orbiter. Study 1968. In Chelomei's draft project for the UR-700, he proposed that lunar versions of the Almaz OPS be placed in lunar orbit to conduct detailed reconnaissance of the surface using manned assistance. More...
  • MK-700 Russian manned Mars flyby. Study 1972. Chelomei was the only Chief Designer to complete an Aelita draft project and present it to the Soviet government. More...
  • Almaz OPS-2 Russian manned space station. Cancelled 1979. The initial Almaz military space station program planned in 1965 consisted of two phases. More...
  • LK-3 Russian manned lunar lander. Reached mock-up stage, 1972. The LK-3 was Chelomei's preliminary design for a direct-landing alternative to Korolev's L3 manned lunar landing design. More...
  • Almaz Russian manned space station. 3 launches, 1973.04.03 (Salyut 2) to 1976.06.22 (Salyut 5). Chelomei's Almaz space station was designed to conduct orbital research into the usefulness of manned observation of the earth. More...
  • Almaz OPS Russian manned space station. 3 launches, 1973.04.03 (Salyut 2) to 1976.06.22 (Salyut 5). Vladimir Chelomei's Almaz OPS was the only manned military space station ever actually flown. More...
  • OPS + TKS Russian manned space station. Cancelled 1976. Designation give to combined TKS+OPS Almaz station. More...
  • KSI Russian logistics spacecraft. Study 1977. Capsule designed to return film and data materials from the Almaz military space station. More...
  • TKS Russian manned spacecraft. 4 launches, 1977.07.17 (Cosmos 929) to 1985.09.27 (Cosmos 1686). More...
  • NPG Russian manned space station. Cancelled 1986. A later version of the 37K design for military experiments, the NPG Retained Payload, would be mounted in the payload bay of Buran and connected to the orbiter's cockpit area by an access tunnel. More...
  • LKS Russian manned spaceplane. Mock-up stage when cancelled in 1983. The LKS was a Chelomei design for a reusable manned winged spacecraft, similar to the later European Hermes spaceplane. More...
  • Mir Modules-FGB Russian manned space station. Study 1985. Space station modules derived from the Chelomei TKS ferry. See entries for Kvant-2, Priroda, Spektr, and Kristal for details on each. More...
  • Kvant Russian manned space station. One launch, 1987.03.31 (Kvant 1). The Kvant spacecraft represented the first use of a new kind of Soviet space station module, designated 37K. More...
  • Polyus Russian military anti-satellite system. One launch, 1987.05.15. The Polyus military testbed was put together on a crash basis as an answer to America's Star Wars program. More...
  • Kvant-2 Russian manned space station. One launch, 1989.11.26, Kvant 2. Kvant-2 was a utility module launched to the Mir station. It provided an airlock, additional electric power, and additional gyrodynes for orienting the station. More...
  • Kristall Russian manned space station. One launch, 1990.05.31. Kristal was a dedicated zero-gravity materials and biological science research module for the Mir space station, launched in January 1990 More...
  • IS-MU Russian military anti-satellite system. Reportedly deployed in 1990. Improved modernized ASAT/ABM. Reportedly deployed in 1980's without flight test, replacing IS-A. Accepted into military service in 1991. More...
  • Teknologia Russian materials science satellite. Study 1990. In 1990 KB Salyut proposed an unmanned derivative of the TKS to conduct zero-gravity materials production experiments. More...
  • Tellura Russian earth land resources satellite. Study 1990. In 1990 KB Salyut proposed an unmanned derivative of the TKS manned ferry to conduct earth resources experiments. More...
  • Bioteknologiya Russian materials science satellite. Study 1992. In 1991 the Salyut Design Bureau proposed a satellite based on a derivative of the class of spacecraft which serve as the heavy add-on modules for the Mir space station, e.g., Kvant 2 and Kristal. More...
  • Spektr - Original Russian military anti-satellite system. Study 1989. Chelomei designed a spacecraft bus for space based weapons based on his TKS space tug. This was an alternate / competitive design to the NPO Energia USB. More...
  • Skif-DM Russian materials science satellite. Cancelled 1992. In 1990 KB Salyut proposed using the back-up of the Polyus 'star wars' test bed as a huge zero-gravity materials production facility. More...
  • Space Biotechnological Complex Russian materials science satellite. Study 1992. In 1991 the Salyut Design Bureau proposed a Space Biotechnological Complex, for production of pharmaceutical products in zero gravity. More...
  • TMP Russian materials science satellite. Study 1992. The enormous 88 metric ton Engineering Production Module (TMP) was proposed by the Salyut Design Bureau in the early 1990's. More...
  • Spektr Russian manned space station. One launch, 1995.05.20. Spektr was a module of the Mir space station. It began life as a dedicated military research unit. More...
  • Priroda Russian manned space station. One launch, 1996.04.23. Priroda was the last Mir module launched. It was originally an all-Soviet remote sensing module for combined civilian and military surveillance of the earth. More...
  • Alpha Lifeboat Russian manned rescue spacecraft. Study 1995. 1995 joint Energia-Rockwell-Khrunichev design for space station Alpha lifeboat based on the Zarya reentry vehicle with a solid retrofire motor, cold gas thruster package. Five years on-orbit storage. More...
  • Kondor Russian communications satellite. Study 1997. The Khrunichev State Space Research and Production Center (including the Salyut Design Bureau), proposed the Kondor communications system for mobile users. More...
  • Simsat Russian technology satellite. 2 launched, 2000.05.16. 660 kg dummy satellite. More...
  • PK Russian manned spacecraft. Study 2018. This conical, six-crew space capsule represented the Russian Space Agency's preferred design to support Russian spaceflight in the 2018-2068 period. More...

Associated Engines
  • R6-117 Chelomei N2O4/UDMH rocket engine. 132 kN. LK-1 Blok A. Developed 1964-66. Developed in cooperation with OKB-117 on the basis of the latter's main engine for the UR-100 stage II. More...

See also
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Kh-101 Russian air-to-surface missile. Chelomei mobile-launched version of V-1 More...
  • Kh-102 Russian air-to-surface missile. Chelomei mobile-launched version of V-1 More...
  • MKR Russian intercontinental cruise missile. A wide range of MKR (intercontinental winged missiles) were studied in 1957-1960 in accordance with a decree of the General Staff. The trade-off studies encompassed long-range air-breathing aircraft, winged rockets, and aircraft launchers for air-breathing missiles. More...
  • 10Kh Chelomei mobile-launched short range cruise missile derived from the German V-1. Did not reach production. More...
  • Initial UR-500 Russian orbital launch vehicle. While Chelomei's OKB was still preparing the UR-200 draft project, it was proposed to use this as the basis for the UR-500 heavy universal rocket, with five times the payload capacity. These initial 1961 studies consisted of 4 two-stage UR-200 rockets lashed together, the first and second stages working in parallel in clusters. A third stage would be modified from the UR-200 second stage. However analysis indicated that the payload capacity could not meet the military's requirements. More...
  • Monoblock UR-500 Russian orbital launch vehicle. During UR-500 design studies, two variants of the first stage were considered: polyblock and monoblock. The monoblock approach was that the first stage be assembled from two separate modules with the same diameter: an upper oxidiser module and a lower fuel and engine block. In assembly trials of this design it proved difficult, because of the height of the first stage, to obtain access to the upper stages and payload atop the rocket. Although there was a payload advantage compared to the more compact polyblock design, this was relatively small and outweighed by the operational difficulties. More...
  • Polyblock UR-500 Russian orbital launch vehicle. UR-500 design studies considered two variants of the first stage: polyblock and monoblock. The polyblock variant consisted of a centre large diameter oxidizer tank surrounded by several smaller diameter fuel tanks. This version could be assembled in a special rig with the lateral blocks being sequentially mounted on the centre. In January 1962 this design was chosen as most advantageous, following studies that indicated improved wind loads and bending moment characteristics compared to the monoblock design. The developed version of the design would become known as the Proton. More...
  • UR-700 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. The UR-700 was the member of Vladimir Chelomei's Universal Rocket family designed in the 1960's to allow direct manned flight by the LK-700 spacecraft to the surface of the moon. However Korolev's N1 was the selected Soviet super-booster design. Only when the N1 ran into schedule problems in 1967 was work on the UR-700 resumed. The draft project foresaw first launch in May 1972. But no financing for full scale development was forthcoming; by then it was apparent that the moon race was lost. More...
  • UR-200 Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. Universal rocket designed by Chelomei to cover the ICBM, FOBS, satellite launch vehicle, and spaceplane booster roles. Flight tested in 1963-1964 but cancelled in favour of Yangel's R-36. More...
  • UR-200A Russian intercontinental boost-glide missile. Version that would boost the Raketoplan combat re-entry vehicle, which would use aerodynamic horizontal and vertical manoeuvring to penetrate enemy space defences and be practically invulnerable. More...
  • UR-200B Russian orbital missile. Global rocket version. Would place nuclear warhead into orbit, which would approach United States from any direction at low altitude and be deorbited with little warning time on on enemy targets. More...
  • Taran Russian anti-ballistic missile. Anti-ballistic missile design that was part of the basic capability of the UR-100. Studied in 1962-1964 but abandoned. More...
  • UR-100M SLBM Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100M designation was used for a naval version of the UR-100, developed by Chelomei in 1962-1964. This would fit in the Navy's D-8 launch system. It was rejected in favour of the R-29 from Makeyev, who became the Navy's traditional supplier of SLBM's. More...
  • UR-100 Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100 lightweight ICBM was the Soviet answer to the US Minuteman and was deployed in larger numbers than any other in history. It remained an enigma outside of intelligence circles in the West until after the collapse of the Soviet Union. It allowed the Soviet Union to match, and then surpass the United States in strategic deterrent capability. As such it was Vladimir Chelomei's crowning legacy to his country. More...
  • UR-500 Russian orbital launch vehicle. The original UR-500 two stage configuration was designed as a monster ICBM. It was flown four times from 1965, but never deployed as an operational missile. The design was succeeded by three and four stage versions for launching of large payloads into space. More...
  • Proton The Proton launch vehicle has been the medium-lift workhorse of the Soviet and Russian space programs for over forty years. Although constantly criticized within Russia for its use of toxic and ecologically-damaging storable liquid propellants, it has out-lasted all challengers, and no replacement is in sight. Development of the Proton began in 1962 as a two-stage vehicle that could be used to launch large military payloads or act as a ballistic missile with a 100 megaton nuclear warhead. The ICBM was cancelled in 1965, but development of a three-stage version for the crash program to send a Soviet man around the moon began in 1964. The hurried development caused severe reliability problems in early production. But these were eventually solved, and from the 1970's the Proton was used to launch all Russian space stations, medium- and geosynchronous orbit satellites, and lunar and planetary probes. More...
  • Proton-K/D Russian orbital launch vehicle. This four stage version of the Proton was originally designed to send manned circumlunar spacecraft into translunar trajectory. Guidance to the Block D stage must be supplied by spacecraft. The design was proposed on 8 September 1965 by Korolev as an alternate to Chelomei's LK-1 circumlunar mission. It combined the Proton 8K82K booster for the LK-1 with the N1 lunar Block D stage to boost a stripped-down Soyuz 7K-L1 spacecraft around the moon. The Korolev design was selected, and first flight came on 10 March 1967. The crash lunar program led to a poor launch record. Following a protracted ten year test period, the booster finally reached a level of launch reliability comparable to that of other world launch vehicles. More...
  • Proton-K Russian orbital launch vehicle. Development of a three-stage version of the UR-500 was authorised in the decree of 3 August 1964. Decrees of 12 October and 11 November 1964 authorised development of the Almaz manned military space station and the manned circumlunar spacecraft LK-1 as payloads for the UR-500K. Remarkably, due to continuing failures, the 8K82K did not satisfactorily complete its state trials until its 61st launch (Salyut 6 / serial number 29501 / 29 September 1977). Thereafter it reached a level of launch reliability comparable to that of other world launch vehicles. More...
  • UR-700 / RD-350 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. UR-700 with high energy upper stage consisting of 3 x RD-350 LF2/LH2 engines with a total thrust of 450 tonnes. Usable third stage propellant 350 tonnes, payload increased to 215 tonnes More...
  • UR-700 / RO-31 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. UR-700 with high energy upper stage consisting of 7 x RO-31 Nuclear A engines using LH2+Methane propellants with a total thrust of 280 tonnes. Usable third stage propellant 196 tonnes, payload increased to 230 to 250 tonnes More...
  • UR-700 / 11D54 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. UR-700 with high energy upper stage consisting of 9 x RD-54 / 11D54 Lox/LH2 engines with a total thrust of 360 tonnes. Usable third stage propellant 300 tonnes, payload to a 200 km, 51.5 degree orbit increased to 185 tonnes More...
  • UR-100K Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100K was a version of the 8K84M with further improvements in accuracy and capable of delivering three separate (but not independently targeted) re-entry vehicles. More...
  • UR-900 Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. In 1962 Vladimir Chelomei proposed a family of modular launch vehicles. In January 1969, Chelomei was proposing the UR-900 for the Mars expedition. A garbled description of this launch vehicle appears in Chertok's memoirs. This would seem to be a version of the UR-700 moon rocket using 15 RD-270 modules in the first and second stages in place as opposed to the nine modules of the UR-700. The third and fourth stages were derived from the UR-500. The booster could deliver 240 tonnes to low earth orbit. More...
  • UR-700M Russian heavy-lift orbital launch vehicle. In 1969 the Soviet Union began project Aelita, studying the best method to beat the Americans in landing a man on Mars. Chelomei's team reached the conclusion that a Mars expedition would best be launched by an immense vehicle would allow their MK-700 Mars spacecraft to be orbited in two launches. The proposed UR-700M launch vehicle had a gross lift-off mass of 16,000 metric tons and could deliver 750 metric tons to orbit. By 1972 the Nixon administration had cancelled NASA's plans for manned Mars missions. Perhaps not coincidentally, a Soviet expert commission the same year concluded that the Mars project - and the UR-700M booster - were beyond the technical and economical capabilities of the Soviet Union and should be shelved indefinitely. More...
  • UR-100M Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The 8K84M was an improved version of the UR-100 with an improved empty mass fraction, a new guidance system, countermeasures capability, and post-boost manoeuvrability to defeat enemy anti-ballistic missile systems. More...
  • UR-100U Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100U was a development of the UR-100K with improved shock isolation in the silo. More...
  • UR-100N Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100N was designed as a replacement for the UR-100 at the end of its ten year storage life. Although it could be installed in the same silos, it was 50% heavier. The competing design of Yangel, the MR-UR-100, was also put into production when the Soviet hierarchy deadlocked and could not pick one design over the other. More...
  • Proton-K/DM Russian orbital launch vehicle. The original four stage Proton / Block D configuration was used until 1976, at which time it was replaced by a modernised version equipped with N2O4/UDMH verniers for precise placement of payloads in geosynchronous orbit and its own self-contained guidance unit. This was accepted into military service in 1978 with the first Raduga launch. The stage was first developed for launch of gesynchronous military communications and early warning satellites (Raduga, Ekran, Gorizont, Potok, SPRN). Its later versions continue in use for launch of MEO and geosynchronous comsats, and was Russia's most successful commercial launcher. More...
  • UR-500MK Russian orbital launch vehicle. In 1975 Chelomei proposed this version of the Proton powered by lox/kerosene NK-33 engines developed for the cancelled N1 moon booster. This would give the Soviet Union an equivalent to the all-new Zenit-2 booster being developed by Glushko, but at a fraction of the time and expense through the use of existing components. The proposal had no chance politically, and was never seriously considered. More...
  • Proton-K/D-1 Russian orbital launch vehicle. This derivative of the original four stage Block D / 11S824 version of the Proton was used from 1978 to launch Lavochkin OKB planetary probes (Mars, Venera) and high earth orbit astronomical observatories (Astron, Granat). Guidance to the Block D-1 stage must be supplied by spacecraft. Equipped with N2O4/UDMH verniers for precise placement of payloads in high orbits or planetary trajectories. More...
  • UR-100NU Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. Development of an improved version of the UR-100N was authorised on 16 April 1976 (UR-100NU; U = UTTKh = 'Improved Technical-Tactical Characteristics). Viktor Bugaisk at TsKBM headed the engineering team. The UR-100NU was to have a new warhead dispenser bus and improved guidance system by Vladimir Sergeyev of NII-692. The new system allowed up to six pre-programmed targets to be entered, any one of which could be selected at launch. This allowed deployment of better countermeasures and a considerable improvement in accuracy. More...
  • UR-530 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Design for an upgraded Proton, replacing the first stage with a cluster of six modular stages derived from the UR-100N first stage. Detail design to the draft project stage was undertaken in 1976-1977 but the much larger and more expensive Energia/Buran system was selected for development instead. More...
  • Proton-K/DM-2 Russian orbital launch vehicle. This improved four stage version uses the Block DM-2 / 11S861 fourth stage, which has its own guidance unit. This reduces payload but does not require the spacecraft's guidance system to provide steering commands to booster. Replaced the original Block DM / 11S86 version from 1982 to 1995. Used for launch of Glonass navigation satellites into medium earth orbit; and launch of Luch, Ekran-M, Potok, Raduga, Gorizont, Raduga-1, Elektro, and Gals communications satellites into geosynchronous orbit. Commercial version with Saab payload adapter-seperation system for Western payloads was dubbed 'Block DM1'. More...
  • Proton-K/DM-2 DM1 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of the 11S861 with adapter for Lockheed Martin AS 4000 bus spacecraft. More...
  • Proton-K/D-2 Russian orbital launch vehicle. This four stage version of the Proton was a modification of the original Block D / 11S824M for launch of late 1980's Lavochkin OKB probes on missions to Mars. Guidance to the Block D-2 stage must be supplied by spacecraft. More...
  • Meteorit Russian intermediate range cruise missile. Development of three variants of this cruise missile was authorised on 9 December 1976. The Meteorit-M strategic version would be deployed from 667M submarines with 12 launchers per boat. The air-launched Meteorit-A would be launched from Tu-95 bombers. The land-based version was designated Meteorit-N. The missile was also sometimes referred to by the code-name Grom. The first test launch, on 20 May 1980, was unsuccessful, as were the next three attempts. The first successful flight did not come until 16 December 1981. The first launch from a 667M submarine took place on 26 December 1983 from the Barents Sea. However all variants were cancelled in 1988 as a result of the INF Treaty. More...
  • Rokot Russian all-solid orbital launch vehicle, consisting of decommissioned UR-100N ICBMs with a Briz-KM upper stage. More...
  • Rokot K Russian all-solid orbital launch vehicle. Version with Briz-K upper stage. More...
  • Albatros ICBM Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. Albatros was an ICBM designed by NPO Mashinostroeniya under Chief Designer Gerbert Yefremov according to a decree of 9 February 1987. Like the Yuzhnoye Universal ICBM, it was to be built in enormous numbers in order to defeat any deployment by America of mass missile defences under their Strategic Defence Initiative. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and the abandonment of SDI by the United States, the missile was cancelled. More...
  • 17K-AM A small two stage to orbit horizontal takeoff / horizontal landing vehicle proposed for the Russian Air Force in 1993. More...
  • Proton-K/DM-2M This four stage version uses the Block DM-2M / 11S861-01 upper stage, which has its own self-contained guidance unit. This reduces payload but does not require the spacecraft's guidance system to provide steering commands to booster. Used for launches of Russian geosynchronous satellites from 1994 on. More...
  • Angara 1.1 Russian orbital launch vehicle. The initial flight version would be the Angara 1.1, featuring a single URM core module with the existing Briz upper stage. Payload would be 2.0 tonnes to a 200 km / 63 deg orbit). Other vehicle variants were numbered according to the number of URM's. More...
  • Proton-K/17S40 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of Proton using Block DM-5 / 17S40 fourth stage. This stage has a new payload adapter for use with heavier paylods launched into sub-synchronous orbits. Used for launch of Arkon reconnaisance satellite. More...
  • Proton-K/17S40 DM2 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of the 17S40 with payload adapter for deployment of multiple LM 700 (Iridium) spacecraft into medium earth orbit. More...
  • Angara 4A Russian orbital launch vehicle. The Angara 4A had the same configuration as the Angara 1.2 but with a winged, recoverable URM. The booster would have 158 tonnes lift-off mass, and could place a 2.7 tonne payload into a 200 km / 63 deg orbit). The winged URM would have two jet engines and fly back to the Mirniy airfield at Plesetsk for recovery. One problem was that some abort profiles would require overflight of Norway. First flight of this version was predicted for 2003 in 1998. More...
  • Proton/Briz K/M Earlier 8K82K model Proton, but Briz M storable propellant upper stage replaced the Block D cyrogenic stage. More...
  • Angara The Angara was a new all-Russian heavy launch vehicle designed to replace the Zenit (which was built by a Ukrainian company) and Proton (which had launch pads only on Kazakh territory). The booster was sized for rail transport of modular manufactured components to cosmodromes at Plesetsk and Svobodniy. The design featured a single modular core that could be clustered for large payloads or used as a first stage with a variety of existing upper stages. All plans for the Angara were dependent on financing and subject to constant change. More...
  • Angara 1.2 Russian orbital launch vehicle. First planned upgrade of Angara, the 1.2 version would use a new Block I lox/kerosene upper stage. Payload would be 3.7 tonnes to a 200 km / 63 deg orbit. More...
  • Angara 5A Russian orbital launch vehicle. The Angara 5A was a proposed variant of the modular launch vehicle that would use four universal rocket modules (URM's) as boosters surrounding one URM in the core, with a Lox/LH2 upper stage. It could put 5.0 tonnes into geosynchronous orbit, or 8.0 tonnes into geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Angara 3A Russian orbital launch vehicle. The Angara 3A was a proposed variant of the modular launch vehicle that would use two universal rocket modules (URM's) as boosters flanking one URM in the core, with a Lox/Kerosene upper stage. It could put 14 tonnes into low earth orbit More...
  • Proton/Briz M Improved Proton orbital launch vehicle. Improvements in lower stages to reduce structural mass, increase thrust, and fully utilize propellants (reducing release of toxic chemicals in stage impact areas). Briz M storable propellant upper stage replaces Block D cyrogenic stage. More...
  • Strela Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. Launch vehicle by NPO MASH based on UR-100N's decommissioned from Ukrainian missile fields. 106 tonne liftoff mass. More...
  • Proton-M/DM-2 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Improved Proton-M stages, mated to the older 11S861 upper stage for certain payloads. More...
  • Angara Orel Russian orbital launch vehicle. The Orel, consisted of the Angara 3I plus an MKK spaceplane, similar to the MAKS. This would have a 431 tonne gross lift-off mass, with the spacecraft weighing 13.5 tonnes including a 4.2 tonne payload. This could be an eventual replacement of the Soyuz spacecraft for ferry of crews to space stations. More...
  • Proton-K/DM-2M DM3 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of the 11S861-01 with Saab payload adapter-seperation system for insertion of Hughes HS-601 bus spacecraft into geosynchronous orbit. More...
  • Proton-K/DM-2M DM4 Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of the 11S861-01 with Saab payload adapter-seperation system for insertion of FS-1300 bus spacecraft into geosynchronous orbit. More...

Associated Programs
  • ISS Finally completed in 2010 after a torturous 25-year development and production process, the International Space Station was originally conceived as the staging post for manned exploration of the solar systrem. Instead, it was seemed to be the death knell of manned spaceflight. More...

Associated Stages
  • Briz-KM N2O4/UDMH propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 6,700/1,700 kg. Thrust 19.60 kN. Briz KM differs from Briz K in having 'compact' components, special payload truss for Globalstar dispenser. The truss is 1.8 m in diameter and has a volume of 8.8 m3. More...

Chelomei Chronology


1961 August 15 - . LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton.
  • Chelomei begins UR-500 Proton design studies. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Chelomei. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: GR-2. At first the launch vehicle was simply to consist of 4 two-stage UR-200 rockets lashed together, the first and second stages working in parallel in clusters. A third stage would be modified from the UR-200 second stage. However study of this configuration, which included manufacturing of a dynamic test article, indicated that the payload capacity could not meet the military’s requirements.

1961 November 15 - . LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton.
  • Development of RD-253 engine begun. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Glushko; Korolev. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: GR-2. OKB-52 began to collaborate with V P Glushko’s OKB-456 in developing a high thrust storable propellant engine for the UR-500 Proton launch vehicle. Glushko had completed a storable liquid engine design of 150 tonnes for use in Korolev’s N1. However Korolev refused to accept this design, due to his categorical refusal to use toxic propellants in his rockets and his belief that such propellants could never deliver the required specific impulse. Korolev insisted on development of an oxygen-kerosene engine; Glushko categorically refused to do so. As a result, the two leading Soviet rocket designers irrevocably split. Korolev had to turn for development of his N1 engines to the aviation engine design OKB of N D Kuznetsov.

1962 January 15 - . LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton.
  • Proton configuration selected. - . Nation: USSR. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: GR-2. Summary: The 'polyblock' design was chosen as most advantageous, following studies that indicated improved wind loads and bending moment characteristics compared to the conventional 'monoblock' design..

1962 May 15 - . LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton.
  • UR-500 advanced project published. - . Nation: USSR. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: GR-2.

1962 July 15 - . LV Family: UR-200. Launch Vehicle: UR-200.
  • UR-200 draft project is completed. - . Nation: USSR. Manufacturer: Chelomei.

1963 June 15 - . LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton.
  • First tests of RD-253 engine cluster for Proton. - . Nation: USSR. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: GR-2. Summary: Ground tests of the clustered engine assembly ran from June 1963 to January 1965..

1998 November 20 - . 06:40 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/23. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K. LV Configuration: Proton-K 395-01.
  • Zarya - . Payload: FGB 77KM s/n 175-01. Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned space station. Spacecraft: ISS Zarya. USAF Sat Cat: 25544 . COSPAR: 1998-067A. Apogee: 403 km (250 mi). Perigee: 374 km (232 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.30 min. This was the first launch in the assembly of the International Space Station. The Zarya FGB was funded by NASA and built by Khrunichev in Moscow under subcontract from Boeing for NASA. Its design from the TKS military station resupply spacecraft of the 1970’s and the later 77KS Mir modules. Zarya included a multiple docking adapter, a pressurised cabin section, and a propulsion/instrument section with a rear docking port. Initial orbit was 176 lm x 343 km x 51.6 degrees. By November 25 it had manoeuvred to a 383 km x 396 km x 51.7 degree orbit, awaiting the launch of Shuttle mission STS-88 which docked the Unity node to it.

2000 May 16 - . 08:27 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC133/1. Launch Pad: LC133/pad?. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: Rokot.
  • Simsat-1 - . Mass: 657 kg (1,448 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Eurockot. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: Simsat. USAF Sat Cat: 26365 . COSPAR: 2000-026A. Apogee: 562 km (350 mi). Perigee: 543 km (337 mi). Inclination: 86.3707 deg. Period: 95.62 min. First Rokot flight from Plesetsk, using a launch pad originally used for Kosmos rockets. The two-stage modified UR-100NUTTKh ICBM, delivered a Briz-KM upper stage to a suborbital trajectory. The first Briz burn was to an approximately 200 x 550 km transfer orbit; the second burn circularized at apogee. It placed two 660 kg dummy satellites in orbits similar to the parking orbit was used for the defunct Iridium program. The Briz-KM stage then made a third burn to lower its perigee to a 178 x 556 km x 86.4 deg disposal orbit.
  • Simsat-2 - . Mass: 657 kg (1,448 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Eurockot. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: Simsat. USAF Sat Cat: 26366 . COSPAR: 2000-026B. Apogee: 557 km (346 mi). Perigee: 545 km (339 mi). Inclination: 86.3670 deg. Period: 95.59 min.

2000 July 12 - . 04:56 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/23. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K. LV Configuration: Proton-K 398-01.
  • Zvezda - . Mass: 20,295 kg (44,742 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Chelomei; Korolev. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned space station. Spacecraft: ISS Zvezda. USAF Sat Cat: 26400 . COSPAR: 2000-037A. Apogee: 332 km (206 mi). Perigee: 179 km (111 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Years behind schedule, the Zvezda living module of the International Space Station, built and financed by Russia, finally reached orbit. Zvezda's initial orbit was 179 x 332 km x 51.6 deg. On July 14 the orbit was raised to 288 x 357 km. ISS was then in a 365 x 372 km orbit. After matching orbits with the ISS, Zvezda then became the passive docking target for the Russian-built, US-financed Zarya module already attached to the station. The Zarya/Unity stack docked with the Zvezda module at 00:45 GMT on July 26, forming the basic core of the International Space Station. A flood of NASA missions would follow to bring the station into operation.

2002 July 25 - . 15:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/17S40. LV Configuration: Proton-K/17S40 (DM-5).
  • Cosmos 2392 - . Mass: 2,600 kg (5,700 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Arkon-1. USAF Sat Cat: 27470 . COSPAR: 2002-037A. Apogee: 1,774 km (1,102 mi). Perigee: 1,506 km (935 mi). Inclination: 63.5000 deg. Period: 119.10 min. This was the second launch of the Arkon-1 electro-optical reconnaissance. The 17S40 Blok DM5 upper stage and satellite were placed by the Proton into a parking orbit. The DM then made two burns to place the satellite in its 1500 x 1836 km x 64.4 deg operational orbit.

2002 October 17 - . 04:41 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/17S40. LV Configuration: Proton-K/17S40 (DM2) 409-01.
  • Integral - . Mass: 4,100 kg (9,000 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Astronomy. Type: Gamma ray astronomy satellite. Spacecraft: Integral. USAF Sat Cat: 27540 . COSPAR: 2002-048A. Apogee: 153,435 km (95,339 mi). Perigee: 9,283 km (5,768 mi). Inclination: 53.4000 deg. Period: 4,310.60 min. Summary: INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) was a European (ESA) astrophysics satellite. The orbit had a very high apogee to escape magnetospheric radiation..

2003 December 28 - . 23:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2M. LV Configuration: Proton-K/DM-2M 410-04.
  • Ekspress AM-22 - . Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Ekspress. USAF Sat Cat: 28134 . COSPAR: 2003-060A. Apogee: 35,796 km (22,242 mi). Perigee: 35,778 km (22,231 mi). Inclination: 0.0400 deg. Period: 1,436.11 min. Summary: The Ekspress AM-22 communications satellite was built by NPO PM and Alcatel Space for GPKS, the Russian Space Communications Company. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 52.99E drifting at 0.005W degrees per day..

2004 March 27 - . 03:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/23. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2. LV Configuration: Proton-K/DM-2 410-05.
  • Raduga-1 - . Mass: 2,000 kg (4,400 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Raduga-1. USAF Sat Cat: 28194 . COSPAR: 2004-010A. Apogee: 35,806 km (22,248 mi). Perigee: 35,768 km (22,225 mi). Inclination: 1.3000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Military communications satellite. Parked in geostationary orbit at 85.0 deg E, after being placed in unusual subsynchronous drift orbit. Original name Cosmos 2406. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 85.19E drifting at 0.029W degrees per day..

2005 August 26 - . 18:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC133/3. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: Rokot.
  • Monitor-E - . Mass: 700 kg (1,540 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RAKA. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Class: Earth. Type: Earth resources satellite. Spacecraft: Monitor. USAF Sat Cat: 28822 . COSPAR: 2005-032A. Apogee: 545 km (338 mi). Perigee: 522 km (324 mi). Inclination: 97.5000 deg. Period: 95.30 min. Summary: Delayed from June 30, July 30, August 18 2005. Prototype lightweight earth monitoring satellite with 8-meter and 20-meter resolution cameras..

2006 June 17 - . 22:44 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2M. LV Configuration: Proton-K/DM-2M (DM3) 410-12.
  • Kazsat 1 - . Mass: 1,380 kg (3,040 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: KazSat. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Yakhta. USAF Sat Cat: 29230 . COSPAR: 2006-022A. Apogee: 35,781 km (22,233 mi). Perigee: 35,381 km (21,984 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,425.60 min. Summary: As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 103.02E drifting at 0.000W degrees per day..

2007 December 9 - . 00:15 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton/Briz M. LV Configuration: Proton/Briz M s/n D330.
  • Cosmos 2434 - . Mass: 1,900 kg (4,100 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Raduga-1. USAF Sat Cat: 32373 . COSPAR: 2007-058A. Apogee: 35,802 km (22,246 mi). Perigee: 35,772 km (22,227 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Raduga-1 / Globus communications satellite..

2007 December 25 - . 19:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2435 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 21. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 32394 . COSPAR: 2007-065B. Apogee: 19,179 km (11,917 mi). Perigee: 19,081 km (11,856 mi). Inclination: 64.7000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2436 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 22. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 32395 . COSPAR: 2007-065C. Apogee: 19,150 km (11,890 mi). Perigee: 19,100 km (11,800 mi). Inclination: 64.7000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2437 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 23. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 32393 . COSPAR: 2007-065A. Apogee: 19,137 km (11,891 mi). Perigee: 19,123 km (11,882 mi). Inclination: 64.7000 deg. Period: 675.70 min. Summary: Three GLONASS-M satellites lofted in a single launch - inserted in GLONASS orbit plane 2. This was the second launch to populate this plane..

2008 June 26 - . 23:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2M DM3.
  • Cosmos 2440 - . Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Military. Type: Early warning satellite. Spacecraft: Prognoz SPRN. USAF Sat Cat: 33108 . COSPAR: 2008-033A. Apogee: 35,799 km (22,244 mi). Perigee: 35,780 km (22,230 mi). Inclination: 2.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min.

2008 September 25 - . 08:49 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2442 - . Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33378 . COSPAR: 2008-046A. Apogee: 19,144 km (11,895 mi). Perigee: 19,089 km (11,861 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.20 min. Summary: Continued replenishment of Glonass navigation satellite constellation..
  • Cosmos 2443 - . Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33379 . COSPAR: 2008-046B. Apogee: 19,142 km (11,894 mi). Perigee: 19,136 km (11,890 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 676.10 min.
  • Cosmos 2444 - . Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33380 . COSPAR: 2008-046C. Apogee: 19,145 km (11,896 mi). Perigee: 19,132 km (11,888 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 676.10 min.

2008 December 25 - . 10:43 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2447 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 727. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33466 . COSPAR: 2008-067A. Apogee: 19,139 km (11,892 mi). Perigee: 19,121 km (11,881 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.70 min. Summary: Three Glonass satellites launched as part of a continuing effort to reconstitute the full Russian navigation satellite constellation..
  • Cosmos 2449 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 729. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33467 . COSPAR: 2008-067B. Apogee: 19,138 km (11,891 mi). Perigee: 19,117 km (11,878 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.60 min.
  • Cosmos 2448 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 728. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 33468 . COSPAR: 2008-067C. Apogee: 19,143 km (11,894 mi). Perigee: 19,117 km (11,878 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.

2009 February 11 - . 00:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton/Briz M. LV Configuration: Proton/Briz M s/n P342.
  • Ekspress AM-44 - . Mass: 3,672 kg (8,095 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Ekspress. USAF Sat Cat: 33595 . COSPAR: 2009-007A. Apogee: 35,790 km (22,230 mi). Perigee: 35,783 km (22,234 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min.
  • Express MD1 - . Mass: 1,140 kg (2,510 lb). Nation: Russia. Manufacturer: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Ekspress. USAF Sat Cat: 33596 . COSPAR: 2009-007B. Apogee: 35,795 km (22,241 mi). Perigee: 35,779 km (22,231 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: C and L-band transponders..

2009 February 28 - . 04:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2. LV Configuration: Proton-K/DM-2 s/n P343.
  • Raduga 1-8 - . Mass: 2,300 kg (5,000 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Raduga-1. USAF Sat Cat: 34264 . COSPAR: 2009-010A. Apogee: 35,943 km (22,333 mi). Perigee: 35,635 km (22,142 mi). Inclination: 1.2000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min.

2009 December 14 - . 10:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2456 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 730. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36111 . COSPAR: 2009-070A. Apogee: 19,132 km (11,888 mi). Perigee: 19,129 km (11,886 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.80 min. Summary: Annual replenishment of GLONASS satellite constellation..
  • Cosmos 2457 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 733. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36112 . COSPAR: 2009-070B. Apogee: 19,133 km (11,888 mi). Perigee: 19,128 km (11,885 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.80 min.
  • Cosmos 2458 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 734. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36113 . COSPAR: 2009-070C. Apogee: 19,128 km (11,885 mi). Perigee: 18,991 km (11,800 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 672.90 min.

2010 January 28 - . 00:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton/Briz M. LV Configuration: Proton/Briz M s/n P352.
  • Raduga-1M - . Mass: 2,300 kg (5,000 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Spacecraft: Raduga-1. USAF Sat Cat: 36538 . COSPAR: 2010-002A. Apogee: 35,591 km (22,115 mi). Perigee: 35,567 km (22,100 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,425.50 min. Summary: Second new-generation Globus-M military communications satellite..

2010 March 1 - . 21:19 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2459 - . Payload: Uragan-M 24. Mass: 1,415 kg (3,119 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36400 . COSPAR: 2010-007A. Apogee: 19,217 km (11,940 mi). Perigee: 19,043 km (11,832 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2461 - . Payload: Uragan-M 26. Mass: 1,415 kg (3,119 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36401 . COSPAR: 2010-007B. Apogee: 19,137 km (11,891 mi). Perigee: 19,123 km (11,882 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2460 - . Payload: Uragan-M 25. Mass: 1,415 kg (3,119 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 36402 . COSPAR: 2010-007C. Apogee: 19,136 km (11,890 mi). Perigee: 19,124 km (11,883 mi). Inclination: 64.8000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.

2010 September 2 - . 00:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/24. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-M/DM-2.
  • Cosmos 2466 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 738. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 37137 . COSPAR: 2010-041A. Apogee: 19,184 km (11,920 mi). Perigee: 19,076 km (11,853 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2465 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 737. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 37138 . COSPAR: 2010-041B. Apogee: 19,221 km (11,943 mi). Perigee: 19,038 km (11,829 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 675.70 min.
  • Cosmos 2464 - . Payload: Uragan-M s/n 736. Nation: Russia. Agency: Chelomei. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 37139 . COSPAR: 2010-041C. Apogee: 19,181 km (11,918 mi). Perigee: 19,078 km (11,854 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 675.70 min. Summary: Replenishment of Glonass navigation satellite constellation..

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