Encyclopedia Astronautica
100 inch solid


Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 115,350/12,000 kg. Thrust 3,330.00 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 260 seconds. Three-segment solid motor proposed for the Solid Titan II in the SLV-4 competition. Aerojet test fired motors with up to five segments, producing an average thrust of 268,000 kgf for 120 seconds.

The 100 inch diameter was dictated by the diameter of Aerojet's existing heat treating furnace. The segmented motor approach was dictated by the Air Force, since they required the motors to be moved by rail to Vandenberg, and a full-length motor could not be handled by the rail system. Aerojet fired four test motors, with the graphite nozzles disintegrating at 45 and 55 seconds into the burn in the last tests.

Status: Study 1961.
Gross mass: 115,350 kg (254,300 lb).
Unfuelled mass: 12,000 kg (26,000 lb).
Height: 15.60 m (51.10 ft).
Diameter: 2.54 m (8.33 ft).
Span: 2.54 m (8.33 ft).
Thrust: 3,330.00 kN (748,610 lbf).
Specific impulse: 260 s.
Specific impulse sea level: 235 s.
Burn time: 80 s.

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Associated Countries
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Soltan American orbital launch vehicle. The progenitor of the Titan 3 was this design, which used two, 3 segment, 100 inch diameter solid rocket boosters. The 100 inch segmented boosters had already been ground-fired by Aerojet. However the final decision was to develop the more-capable Titan 3C with 5 segment, 120 inch diameter solid rocket boosters. More...

Associated Propellants
  • Solid Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. More...

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