Encyclopedia Astronautica
OAM


Hydrazine propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 714/360 kg. Thrust 0.88 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 222 seconds. Monopropellant final stage providing precise orbital injection. Pressure-fed, indefinite number of restarts.

No Engines: 4.

Status: Out of production.
Gross mass: 714 kg (1,574 lb).
Unfuelled mass: 360 kg (790 lb).
Height: 1.00 m (3.20 ft).
Diameter: 2.30 m (7.50 ft).
Span: 2.30 m (7.50 ft).
Thrust: 882 N (198 lbf).
Specific impulse: 222 s.
Burn time: 1,500 s.
Number: 10 .

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Associated Countries
Associated Engines
  • MR-107 Redmond hydrazine monopropellant rocket engine. 0.257 kN. Spacecraft and upper stage attitude control and dV corrections, Delta 2, Titan 2, PAM D, SICBM, HAS/Peace Courage, Atlas roll control module, STEP, Pegasus. Isp=236s. First flight 1990. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Athena-3 American all-solid orbital launch vehicle. Planned but never flown heavier-lift version of Athena. More...
  • Athena-1 American all-solid orbital launch vehicle. Basic version of the Athena with a Castor 120 first stage, Orbus second stage, and OAM Orbital Adjustment Module. More...
  • Athena-2 American all-solid orbital launch vehicle. The Athena-2 version featured a Castor 120 first stage, Castor 120 second stage, Orbus third stage, and OAM Orbital Adjustment Module. More...
  • Satellite Launch Vehicle American orbital launch vehicle. Orbital version. Selected by NASA under the COTS program in January 2008 in place of the cancelled Kistler for post-shuttle ISS resupply missions. Uses half-length shuttle SRB as first stage; proven Castor-120 as second stage; new Castor-30 as third stage; and Oribtal Adjusment Module from Lockheed's cancelled Athena launcher as a fourth stage. More...

Associated Propellants
  • Hydrazine Hydrazine (N2H4) found early use as a fuel, but it was quickly replaced by UDMH. It is still used as a monopropellant for satellite station-keeping motors. Hydrazine (N2H4) found early use as a fuel, but it was quickly replaced by UDMH. It is still used as a monopropellant for satellite station-keeping motors. More...

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