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Triton
US Navy ship- and sub-to-surface cruise ramjet-powered supersonic missile. Development started in 1946. Program cancelled in 1957.

AKA: SSM-N-2. Status: Cancelled 1957. Gross mass: 9,070 kg (19,990 lb). Height: 14.63 m (47.99 ft). Diameter: 1.52 m (4.98 ft). Span: 1.52 m (4.98 ft). Apogee: 24 km (15 mi).

In September 1946 the US Navy began development of the Triton, a ramjet-powered, supersonic, long range, nuclear armed, strategic cruise missile. As with other supersonic cruise missile projects of this era, this ended up being beyond available technology. The 1950 design described a missile with 16,300 kg (36,000 lb) launch weight, a range of 3700 km (2000 nm) at Mach 2 with an 1800 kg thermonuclear warhead, using inertial guidance supplemented by stellar updates and precision terminal homing. And - it had to be launched using existing subsonic Regulus handling systems. In 1955 full scale development was approved of a more realistic design with a launch weight of 12,400 kg (27,300 lb), 2200 km (1200 nm) range, and 680 kg (1,500 lb) warhead. This was to be operational in 1965. The project was cancelled in 1957 when it was realized the Polaris submarine-launched ballistic missile, scheduled for deployment in 1960, would make all such cruise missiles obsolete.

Development Cost $: 19.400 million in 1953 dollars. Maximum range: 2,400 km (1,400 mi). Boost Propulsion: Solid rocket. Maximum speed: 4,520 kph (2,800 mph). Initial Operational Capability: 1957.


More at: Triton.

Family: IRCM, submarine-launched, US Cruise Missiles. Country: USA. Agency: Applied Physics Lab.

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