Encyclopedia Astronautica
August 10


August 10 Chronology


1902 August 10 - .
  • Birth of Alfred Grevesmuehl - . Nation: Germany; Russia. Summary: German scientist in WW2, member of the Rocket Team in the Soviet Union, worked on rocket engine development in Glushko's design bureau from 1947 to 1952. Director of Manufacturing; Dept. 61/Shop 55..

1945 August 10 - .
  • Dr. Robert Goddard died in Baltimore. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Goddard.

1948 August 10 - . Launch Site: White Sands. Launch Complex: White Sands LC33. LV Family: Nike. Launch Vehicle: Nike. LV Configuration: Nike M.
  • Test mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Apogee: 10 km (6 mi).

1951 August 10 - .
  • XS-1 Flight 152 - . Crew: Crossfield. Payload: XS-1 # 2 flight 71. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Crossfield. Class: Manned. Type: Manned rocketplane. Spacecraft: XS-1. Summary: NACA flight 51. Wing loads and aileron effectiveness. Elevator and stabilizer pull-ups, clean stalls..

1952 August 10 - .
1954 August 10 - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Honest John. Launch Vehicle: Honest John. LV Configuration: Honest John 439C.
  • Test mission - . Nation: USA. Apogee: 10 km (6 mi).

1956 August 10 - . 15:22 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. Launch Complex: White Sands LC35. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee XASR-SC-1. LV Configuration: Aerobee XASR-SC-1 SC 35 (S/N 10).
  • Sampling Aeronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Apogee: 85 km (52 mi). Summary: Composition research. Launched at 0822 local time. Reached 85.9 km..

1957 August 10 - .
  • Claimed first manmade object to escape from earth - . Payload: Steel Metal Cover. Nation: USA. In the summer of 1957 physicist Bob Brownlee attempted to 'contain' the blast effects of an atomic explosion from a device placed at the bottom of a 500 foot vertical shaft in the Nevada desert. A four-inch-thick steel plate weighing 'several hundred pounds' is placed over the hole (diameter not specified). This blew off as expected in the blast and was seen in films to depart the area at six times escape velocity . Brownlee never publicly challenged the Soviet's claim (to having launched the 1st Earth satellite.

1957 August 10 - . 05:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Atlantic Ocean. Launch Pad: 74.3 N x 63.6 W. Launch Platform: LSD-29. LV Family: Rockoon. Launch Vehicle: Loki Rockoon. LV Configuration: Loki Rockoon II5.08F.
  • SUI 63 Aeronomy / aurora / chemical release mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: SUI. Apogee: 117 km (72 mi). Summary: Launched at IGY Rockoon Launch Site 1, Atlantic Ocean LP8 - - Latitude: 74.30 N - Longitude: 63.57 W..

1960 August 10 - . Launch Site: White Sands. Launch Complex: White Sands LC38. LV Family: Nike Zeus. Launch Vehicle: Nike Zeus. LV Configuration: Nike Zeus 9.
  • First Tactical launch - . Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Apogee: 150 km (90 mi).

1960 August 10 - . Launch Site: Eglin. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 300. LV Configuration: Aerobee 300 TATTLETALE PCC 5.
  • Signals intelligence test - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Apogee: 383 km (237 mi).

1960 August 10 - . 01:31 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC6. LV Family: Redstone. Launch Vehicle: Redstone. LV Configuration: Redstone 2023. FAILURE: Erroneously destroyed during boost by range personnel.. Failed Stage: G.
  • - . Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Apogee: 10 km (6 mi). Summary: Missile test failure..

1960 August 10 - . 10:35 GMT - . Launch Site: Eglin. LV Family: Cajun. Launch Vehicle: Nike Cajun. LV Configuration: Nike Cajun AA6.418.
  • Firefly JEANNIE Aeronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Apogee: 104 km (64 mi).

1960 August 10 - . 10:35 GMT - . Launch Site: Woomera. Launch Complex: Woomera LA2. Launch Pad: LA2 SL. LV Family: Skylark. Launch Vehicle: Skylark 2. LV Configuration: Skylark-2 SL61.
  • Grenades / Chaff test - . Nation: Australia. Agency: WRE; RAE. Apogee: 171 km (106 mi).

1960 August 10 - . 20:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC1E. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Thor Agena A. LV Configuration: Thor Agena A 231 / Agena A 1057.
  • Discoverer 13 - . Payload: KH-1 prototype / Agena A 1057. Mass: 850 kg (1,870 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: KH-1. Decay Date: 1960-11-14 . USAF Sat Cat: 48 . COSPAR: 1960-Theta-1. Apogee: 683 km (424 mi). Perigee: 258 km (160 mi). Inclination: 82.8000 deg. Period: 94.00 min. Summary: KH-1 prototype; designed to test capsule recovery system; did not carry camera; capsule successfully recovered from ocean..

1960 August 10 - . 22:46 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC19. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 1. LV Configuration: Titan I J-7.
  • Mk 4 re-entry vehicle test - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi). Summary: Titan 1 J (Mk 4 RV).

1961 August 10 - . 18:27 GMT - . Launch Site: Silver Lake DZ. Launch Pad: 35.3 N x 116.1 W. Launch Platform: NB-52 003. LV Family: X-15. Launch Vehicle: X-15. LV Configuration: X-15 1-22-37.
  • X-15A XLR-99, beta-dot test - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA; USAF. Apogee: 23 km (14 mi). Summary: Maximum Speed - 4401 kph. Maximum Altitude - 23830 m. Lost cabin pressure..

1962 August 10 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC25A. LV Family: Polaris. Launch Vehicle: Polaris A2. LV Configuration: Polaris A2TF-2.
  • Test mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: USN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1962 August 10 - . 21:11 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg OSTF2. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F. LV Configuration: Atlas F 57F. FAILURE: Failure. Failed Stage: 1.
  • Research and development launch - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Apogee: 10 km (6 mi).

1963 August 10 - . 03:17 GMT - . Launch Site: Niijima. LV Family: Lambda. Launch Vehicle: LS-A. LV Configuration: LS-A Sustainer.
  • Test mission - . Nation: Japan. Agency: STA. Apogee: 50 km (31 mi).

1963 August 10 - . 04:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Niijima. LV Family: S. Launch Vehicle: S-A. LV Configuration: S-A1.
  • Test mission - . Nation: Japan. Agency: STA. Apogee: 50 km (31 mi).

1964 August 10 - . Launch Site: Pacific Ocean. Launch Pad: 34.0 N x 123.0 W. Launch Platform: T-AGM-8. LV Family: Iris. Launch Vehicle: Hydra-Iris. LV Configuration: Hydra-Iris GSP-1.
  • LRL GSP-1 Magnetospheric mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: USN NMC. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1965 August 10 - . LV Family: CZ-1. Launch Vehicle: CZ-1.
  • Project 651 - . Nation: China. Related Persons: Tsien. Spacecraft: DFH-1. Summary: Zhou En Lai approves the plan for the construction and launch of China's first satellite..

1965 August 10 - . 17:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. Launch Complex: Wallops Island LA3A. LV Family: Scout. Launch Vehicle: Scout B. LV Configuration: Scout B S131R.
  • SECOR 5 (EGRS 5) - . Payload: SEV / FW4S. Mass: 24 kg (52 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Langley. Class: Earth. Type: Geodetic satellite. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1506 . COSPAR: 1965-063A. Apogee: 2,419 km (1,503 mi). Perigee: 1,134 km (704 mi). Inclination: 69.2000 deg. Period: 122.20 min. Summary: Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space (US Cat B). .
  • Secor 5 - . Payload: Secor 5. Nation: USA. Agency: USA. Spacecraft: SECOR. USAF Sat Cat: 1502 . COSPAR: 1965-063B. Apogee: 2,424 km (1,506 mi). Perigee: 1,136 km (705 mi). Inclination: 69.2000 deg. Period: 122.22 min.

1965 August 10 - . 19:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Delamar Dry Lake DZ. Launch Pad: 37.3 N x 114.9 W. Launch Platform: NB-52 003. LV Family: X-15. Launch Vehicle: X-15. LV Configuration: X-15 3-46-70.
  • X-15A Northrop Scan,BLN test - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA; USAF. Apogee: 82 km (50 mi). Summary: Maximum Speed - 5712 kph. Maximum Altitude - 82601 m. Astronaut wings flight (USAF definition)..

1965 August 10 - . 23:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Salto di Quirra. LV Family: Skylark. Launch Vehicle: Skylark 7C. LV Configuration: Skylark-7C ESRO S05/1.
  • Ultraviolet photometer Ultraviolet astronomy mission - . Nation: Europe. Agency: ESRO. Apogee: 215 km (133 mi).

1966 August 10 - .
  • Soyuz schedule has been delayed again - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Mishin; Demin; Tereshkova; Gagarin; Tyulin. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 1; Soyuz 2A; Soyuz s/n 3/4; Soyuz s/n 5/6. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. Soyuz s/n 1 and 2 will be flown unpiloted by October 1966 Manned flights aboard Soyuz s/n 3, 4, 5, 6 will not take place until the first quarter of 1967. Later Mishin tours the cosmonaut training centre - the first time in his life he has visited the place. Mishin admires the new construction from Demin's balcony on the 11th floor of cosmonaut dormitory, then goes to Tereshkova's apartment on the seventh floor, and then Gagarin's apartment. Mishin insists on drinking a toast of cognac on each visit. Tyulin reveals this is a peace mission - they want to normalize relations and get on with cosmonaut training. At Fedosiya the auxiliary parachute of a Soyuz capsule failed to open during a drop test. Kamanin believes that the Soyuz parachute system is even worse than that of Vostok. His overall impression of the Soyuz is poor: the entire spacecraft looks unimpressive. The small dimensions of hatch, antiquated communication equipment, and inadequate emergency recovery systems are only the most noticeable of many discrepancies. If the automatic docking system does not function, then the entire Soviet space program will collapse in failure.

1966 August 10 - . Launch Site: Tonopah. LV Family: Sandhawk. Launch Vehicle: Sandhawk. LV Configuration: Sandhawk Sandia 281-1. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Test mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: Sandia. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1966 August 10 - . 12:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Kagoshima. LV Family: Kappa. Launch Vehicle: Kappa 9M. LV Configuration: Kappa 9M K-9M-19.
  • VLF Doppler Ionosphere / aeronomy mission - . Nation: Japan. Agency: ISAS. Apogee: 330 km (200 mi).

1966 August 10 - . 19:26 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC13. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Agena D SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 Agena D 5801 (AA17) / Agena D 6630.
  • Lunar Orbiter 1 - . Payload: Lunar Orbiter A. Mass: 386 kg (850 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Langley. Class: Moon. Type: Lunar probe. Spacecraft: Lunar Orbiter. Decay Date: 1966-10-29 . USAF Sat Cat: 2394 . COSPAR: 1966-073A. Lunar Orbiter I was launched from Cape Kennedy Launch Complex 13 at 3:26 p.m. EDT August 10 to photograph possible Apollo landing sites from lunar orbit. The Atlas-Agena D launch vehicle injected the spacecraft into its planned 90-hour trajectory to the moon. A midcourse correction maneuver was made at 8 p.m. the next day; a planned second midcourse maneuver was not necessary. A faultless deboost maneuver on August 14 achieved the desired initial elliptic orbit around the moon, and one week later the spacecraft was commanded to make a transfer maneuver to place it in a final close-in elliptic orbit of the moon.

    During the spacecraft's stay in the final close-in orbit, the gravitational fields of the earth and the moon were expected to influence the orbital elements. The influence was verified by spacecraft tracking data, which showed that the perilune altitude varied with time. From an initial perilune altitude of 58 kilometers, the perilune decreased to 49 kilometers. At this time an orbit adjustment maneuver began an increase in the altitude, which was expected to reach a maximum after three months and then begin to decrease again. The spacecraft was expected to impact on the lunar surface about six months after the orbit adjustment.

    During the photo-acquisition phase of the flight, August 18 to 29, Lunar Orbiter I photographed the 9 selected primary potential Apollo landing sites, including the one in which Surveyor I landed; 7 other potential Apollo landing sites; the east limb of the moon; and 11 areas on the far side of the moon. Lunar Orbiter I also took photos of the earth, giving man the first view of the earth from the vicinity of the moon (this particular view has been widely publicized). A total of 207 frames (sets of medium- and high-resolution pictures) were taken, 38 while the spacecraft was in initial orbit, the remainder while it was in the final close-in orbit. Lunar Orbiter I achieved its mission objectives, and, with the exception of the high-resolution camera, the performance of the photo subsystem and other spacecraft subsystems was outstanding. At the completion of the photo readouts, the spacecraft had responded to about 5,000 discrete commands from the earth and had made about 700 maneuvers.

    Photographs obtained during the mission were assessed and screened by representatives of the Lunar Orbiter Project Office, U.S. Geological Survey, DOD mapping agencies, MSC, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft was deliberately crashed into moon after the mission was completed.


1968 August 10 - . LV Family: Saturn V. Launch Vehicle: Saturn V.
1968 August 10 - . 22:33 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC36A. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas Centaur SLV-3C. LV Configuration: SLV-3C Centaur AC-17 / Centaur D-1A 5104C. FAILURE: Centaur oxidizer leak. No restart.. Failed Stage: 2.
  • ATS 4 - . Payload: ATS D. Mass: 391 kg (862 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Greenbelt. Program: ATS. Class: Technology. Type: Communications technology satellite. Spacecraft: ATS-4. Decay Date: 1968-08-10 . USAF Sat Cat: 3344 . COSPAR: 1968-068A. Apogee: 769 km (477 mi). Perigee: 220 km (130 mi). Inclination: 29.1000 deg. Period: 94.50 min. Applications Technology Satellite that was to have been put into a geosynchronous transfer orbit, instead was left in a nearly-useless LEO orbit. ATS-4 included two cesium contact ion engines. Flight test objectives were to measure thrust and to examine electromagnetic compatibility with other spacecraft subsystems. The 5 cm diameter thrusters were designed to operate at 0.02 kW and provide about 89 microN thrust at about 6700 s specific impulse. The thrusters had the capability to operate at 5 setpoints from 18 to 89 microN. Thrusters were configured so they could be used for East-West station-keeping. Prior to launch, a 5 cm cesium thruster was life tested for 2245 hours at the 67 microN thrust level. However the Centaur upper stage did not achieve a second burn and the spacecraft remained attached to the Centaur in a 218 km by 760 km orbit. It was estimated that the pressure at these altitudes was between 10^-6 and 10^-8 Torr. Each of the two engines was tested on at least two occasions each over the throttling range. Combined test time of the two engines was about 10 hours over a 55 day period. The spacecraft re-entered the atmosphere on October 17, 1968. TheATS-4 flight was the first successful orbital test of an ion engine. There was no evidence of IPS electromagnetic interference related to spacecraft subsystems. Measured values of neutralizer emission current were much less than the ion beam current, implying inadequate neutralization. The spacecraft potential was about -132V which was much different than the anticipated value of about -40V.

1970 August 10 - .
  • Vacations in Russia. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Kutakhov; Borman. Summary: Kutakhov returns from Egypt. Borman will visit the USSR again tomorrow. Afterwards Kamnin will head for a holiday at the spa at Chemitokvadze in the Kavkaz region..

1970 August 10 - . 00:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Kiruna. Launch Complex: Kiruna C. LV Family: Belier. Launch Vehicle: Centaure. LV Configuration: Centaure C51/2.
  • ESRO C51 / 2 Aeronomy mission - . Nation: Europe. Agency: ESRO. Apogee: 154 km (95 mi).

1970 August 10 - . 06:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Atlantic Ocean. Launch Pad: 39.0 N x 30.0 W. Launch Platform: VISE. LV Family: MR-12. Launch Vehicle: MR-12.
  • Ionosphere mission - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 158 km (98 mi).

1970 August 10 - . 16:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Atlantic Ocean. Launch Pad: 39.0 N x 30.0 W. Launch Platform: VISE. LV Family: MR-12. Launch Vehicle: MR-12.
  • Ionosphere mission - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 150 km (90 mi).

1970 August 10 - . 19:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC133/1. LV Family: Kosmos 2. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K63.
  • Cosmos 356 - . Payload: DS-U2-MG s/n 2. Mass: 357 kg (787 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MO. Program: DS. Class: Earth. Type: Magnetosphere satellite. Spacecraft: DS-U2-MG. Completed Operations Date: 1970-10-03 . Decay Date: 1970-10-02 . USAF Sat Cat: 4487 . COSPAR: 1970-059A. Apogee: 573 km (356 mi). Perigee: 231 km (143 mi). Inclination: 82.0000 deg. Period: 92.60 min. Summary: Studed the Earth's magnetic poles..

1971 August 10 - . 02:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Syowa Base. LV Family: S. Launch Vehicle: S-210. LV Configuration: S-210JA-1.
  • Auroral mission - . Nation: Japan. Agency: NIPR. Apogee: 139 km (86 mi).

1971 August 10 - . 04:40 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 170. LV Configuration: Aerobee 170 NASA 13.18DG.
  • NRL NB4.243 Astronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1971 August 10 - . 05:30 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 170A. LV Configuration: Aerobee 170A NASA 13.08GG.
  • Astronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1972 August 10 - . 00:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Jiuquan. Launch Complex: Jiuquan LA2B. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: FB-1. LV Configuration: Feng Bao 1 701-02.
  • Shiyan Peizhong - . Nation: China. Agency: PRC. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi). Summary: Research and Development Suborbital Flight.

1972 August 10 - . 05:45 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 170. LV Configuration: Aerobee 170 NASA 13.38UG.
  • X-ray astronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1972 August 10 - . 06:59 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 170. LV Configuration: Aerobee 170 NASA 13.23UG.
  • Astronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1973 August 10 - . 10:52 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. Launch Complex: White Sands LC35. LV Family: Aerobee. Launch Vehicle: Aerobee 150. LV Configuration: Aerobee 150 CRL A03.211-1.
  • Bremstrahlung Plasma mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: AFCRL. Apogee: 168 km (104 mi).

1973 August 10 - . 15:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. LV Family: Apache. Launch Vehicle: Nike Apache. LV Configuration: Nike Apache NASA 14.514UI.
  • Ionosphere mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 188 km (116 mi).

1974 August 10 - .
  • Death of Wallace Reed Brode at Washington, District Of Columbia. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brode. Summary: American scientist. Associate director of the National Bureau of Standards 1947-1958..

1976 August 10 - . 21:06 GMT - . Launch Site: Kheysa. LV Family: M-100. Launch Vehicle: M-100.
  • - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 84 km (52 mi).

1977 August 10 - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg LF08. LV Family: Minuteman. Launch Vehicle: Minuteman 3.
  • FOT GT59GM-1 Follow-on Test launch - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF SAC. Apogee: 1,300 km (800 mi).

1977 August 10 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. FAILURE: Failure. Failed Stage: U.
  • Zenit-4MKM - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Zenit-4MKM. Decay Date: 1977-08-30 . COSPAR: F770810A. Summary: High resolution photo reconnaissance mission..

1977 August 10 - . 05:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. LV Family: Apache. Launch Vehicle: Nike Apache. LV Configuration: Nike Apache NASA 14.534UE.
  • Plasma mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).

1977 August 10 - . 12:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Syowa Base. LV Family: S. Launch Vehicle: S-210. LV Configuration: S-210JA-27.
  • NO airglow Aurora mission - . Nation: Japan. Agency: NIPR. Apogee: 120 km (70 mi).

1978 August 10 - . 14:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Kapustin Yar. Launch Complex: Kapustin Yar V-2. LV Family: M-100. Launch Vehicle: M-100B.
  • Aeron/Ionos - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 85 km (52 mi).

1979 August 10 - .
  • Ferry flight, KSC to Atlanta - . Nation: USA. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Spacecraft: Enterprise. Summary: Ferry flight, shuttle carrier aircraft/Enterprise (OV-101), KSC to Atlanta (1 hour, 55 minutes).

1979 August 10 - . Launch Site: Sriharikota. Launch Complex: Sriharikota SLV. LV Family: SLV. Launch Vehicle: SLV-3. LV Configuration: SLV-3 SLV-3-E1. FAILURE: Thrust vectoring of second stage failed.. Failed Stage: 2.
  • Rohini 1A - . Payload: Rohini RS-1. Nation: India. Agency: ISRO. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: Rohini 1A. Decay Date: 1979-08-19 . COSPAR: F790810A.

1979 August 10 - . 00:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: Delta 2914. LV Configuration: Delta 2914 638/D149.
  • Westar 3 - . Mass: 572 kg (1,261 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: WUTC. Program: Westar. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 333. Completed Operations Date: 1990-01-24 . USAF Sat Cat: 11484 . COSPAR: 1979-072A. Apogee: 35,883 km (22,296 mi). Perigee: 35,868 km (22,287 mi). Inclination: 10.2000 deg. Period: 1,440.60 min. Spacecraft engaged in practical applications and uses of space technology such as weather or communication (US Cat C). Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 91 deg W in 1979-1990 As of 2 September 2001 located at 7.26 deg W drifting at 1.139 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 158.25E drifting at 1.129W degrees per day.

1979 August 10 - . 17:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Kapustin Yar. Launch Complex: Kapustin Yar V-2. LV Family: MR-12. Launch Vehicle: MR-12.
  • Aeronomy/Ionosphere mission - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 160 km (90 mi).

1981 August 10 - . 20:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Tanegashima. Launch Complex: Tanegashima N. LV Family: Delta. Launch Vehicle: N-2. LV Configuration: N-2 N-8(F).
  • Himawari 2 - . Payload: GMS 2. Mass: 670 kg (1,470 lb). Nation: Japan. Agency: NASDA. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: GMS. Completed Operations Date: 1988-02-01 . USAF Sat Cat: 12677 . COSPAR: 1981-076A. Apogee: 36,034 km (22,390 mi). Perigee: 35,943 km (22,333 mi). Inclination: 12.9000 deg. Period: 1,446.40 min. Geostationary meteorological satellite. N launch vehicle flight number 8 (N-II launch vehicle). Launch time 2003 UT. Launching organization: National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Geostationary longitude 140 deg E. Function: 1) Observation of meteorological phenomena by the visible and infra-red spin scan radiometer. 2) Collection of weather data from various stations. 3) Distribution of weather data to earth stations. 4) Monitoring of solar particles. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 160 deg E in 1981; 140 deg E in 1981-1984; 145 deg E in 1984-1985; 120 deg E in 1985-1988 As of 31 August 2001 located at 33.93 deg E drifting at 2.598 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 153.66W drifting at 2.594W degrees per day.

1982 August 10 - . 17:16 GMT - . Launch Site: White Sands. LV Family: Black Brant. Launch Vehicle: Black Brant 8C. LV Configuration: Black Brant 8C NASA 27.76UL.
  • Extreme ultraviolet Absolute Calibration Solar extreme ultraviolet mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 323 km (200 mi).

1983 August 10 - . 13:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U.
  • Cosmos 1489 - . Payload: Yantar-4K1 s/n 252. Mass: 6,600 kg (14,500 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military surveillance satellite. Spacecraft: Yantar-4K1. Duration: 44.00 days. Decay Date: 1983-09-23 . USAF Sat Cat: 14256 . COSPAR: 1983-083A. Apogee: 299 km (185 mi). Perigee: 173 km (107 mi). Inclination: 64.7000 deg. Period: 89.20 min. Summary: High resolution photo reconnaissance; returned film in two small SpK capsules during the mission and with the main capsule at completion of the mission..

1983 August 10 - . 18:24 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/DM-2. LV Configuration: Proton-K/DM-2 317-01.
  • Cosmos 1490 - . Payload: Glonass s/n 12L. Mass: 1,250 kg (2,750 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass . USAF Sat Cat: 14258 . COSPAR: 1983-084A. Apogee: 19,160 km (11,900 mi). Perigee: 19,100 km (11,800 mi). Inclination: 65.9000 deg. Period: 675.70 min. Glonass test flight. Testing components and apparatus from the space navigation system being set up to determine the position of the Soviet civil aircraft and vessels in the Soviet navy and fishing fleet. Three satellites launched by a single carrier rocket.
  • Cosmos 1491 - . Payload: Glonass s/n 13L. Mass: 1,250 kg (2,750 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 14259 . COSPAR: 1983-084B. Apogee: 19,028 km (11,823 mi). Perigee: 18,863 km (11,720 mi). Inclination: 65.8000 deg. Period: 668.40 min. Glonass test flight. Testing components and apparatus from the space navigation system being set up to determine the position of the Soviet civil aircraft and vessels in the Soviet navy and fishing fleet. Three satellites launched by a single carrier rocket.
  • Cosmos 1492 - . Payload: Glonass Dummy. Mass: 1,250 kg (2,750 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Class: Navigation. Type: Navigation satellite. Spacecraft: Glonass. USAF Sat Cat: 14260 . COSPAR: 1983-084C. Apogee: 19,159 km (11,904 mi). Perigee: 19,156 km (11,902 mi). Inclination: 65.9000 deg. Period: 676.80 min. Glonass test flight. Testing components and apparatus from the space navigation system being set up to determine the position of the Soviet civil aircraft and vessels in the Soviet navy and fishing fleet. Three satellites launched by a single carrier rocket.

1984 August 10 - . 00:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78M. LV Configuration: Molniya 8K78M-ML.
  • Molniya 1-61 - . Payload: Molniya-1T. Mass: 1,800 kg (3,900 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Program: Molniya. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Molniya-1T. Decay Date: 2002-12-31 . USAF Sat Cat: 15182 . COSPAR: 1984-085A. Apogee: 38,330 km (23,810 mi). Perigee: 1,935 km (1,202 mi). Inclination: 64.2000 deg. Period: 716.00 min. Summary: Operation of the long-range telephone and telegraph radio communications system in the USSR; transmission of USSR Central Television programmes to stations in the Orbita network..

1985 August 10 - . 17:00 GMT - . Launch Site: ETR Launch Area. Launch Platform: SSBN 656. Launch Vehicle: Poseidon.
  • Demonstration and shakedown operations launch - . Nation: USA. Agency: USN. Apogee: 500 km (310 mi).

1987 August 10 - . 19:40 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. Launch Vehicle: Rocketsonde.
  • Arcasonde - . Nation: USA. Agency: MRN. Apogee: 61 km (37 mi).

1988 August 10 - . 11:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Thumba. LV Family: M-100. Launch Vehicle: M-100B.
  • - . Nation: USSR. Apogee: 81 km (50 mi).

1989 August 10 - . 12:33 GMT - . Launch Site: Point Mugu. Launch Vehicle: Rocketsonde. LV Configuration: AN/DMQ-9.
  • - . Nation: USA. Agency: MRN. Apogee: 62 km (38 mi).

1990 August 10 - .
  • Magellan, Venus Orbit Insertion - . Nation: USA. Spacecraft: Magellan.

1990 August 10 - . 20:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78M. LV Configuration: Molniya 8K78M-ML.
  • Molniya 1-78 - . Payload: Molniya-1T. Mass: 1,600 kg (3,500 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Program: Molniya. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Molniya-1T. Decay Date: 2007-07-06 . USAF Sat Cat: 20742 . COSPAR: 1990-071A. Apogee: 39,251 km (24,389 mi). Perigee: 1,099 km (682 mi). Inclination: 63.8000 deg. Period: 717.70 min. Summary: Operation of the long-range telephone and telegraph radio communications system in the USSR; transmission of USSR Central Television programmes to stations in the Orbita network and within the framework of international cooperation. .

1991 August 10 - .
  • China accepts nuclear nonproliferation treaty - . Nation: China.

1991 August 10 - . LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Shuttle.
  • Shuttle Columbia overhauled at Palmdale - . Nation: USA. Program: STS. Spacecraft: Columbia. The orbiter returned to service on 9 February 1992. 62 modifications were made, including replacement of the nose cap; removal of the SEADS and SUMS experiment packages; new Auxiliary Power Units installed; carbon brakes and a drag chute installed; Orbiter 6.0 structural modifications made; AP-101S General Purpose Computers replaced the older AP-101P's; and the Thermal Protection System was reworked.

1992 August 10 - . 23:08 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 42P. LV Configuration: Ariane 42P V52.
  • Topex/Poseidon - . Mass: 2,402 kg (5,295 lb). Nation: France. Agency: JPL; CNES. Class: Earth. Type: Sea satellite. Spacecraft: Topex/Poseidon. USAF Sat Cat: 22076 . COSPAR: 1992-052A. Apogee: 1,344 km (835 mi). Perigee: 1,331 km (827 mi). Inclination: 66.0000 deg. Period: 112.40 min. Summary: Ocean sensing, mapping. Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space (US Cat B)..
  • S80/T - . Mass: 50 kg (110 lb). Nation: France. Agency: CNES. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-70. USAF Sat Cat: 22078 . COSPAR: 1992-052C. Apogee: 1,322 km (821 mi). Perigee: 1,308 km (812 mi). Inclination: 66.1000 deg. Period: 111.90 min. An industrial research microsatellite built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) for Matra and CNES to carry out 'Little LEO' communications service experiments. Still operational in 2000. S80/T was designed to investigate the technical feasibility of using a constellation of small satellites placed in near-Earth orbit to provide global communications and position location using only hand-held terminals. S80/T was the first fully commercial application of the SSTL multi-mission, modular microsatellite platform developed at the University of Surrey. The same basic platform was also used for the Korean KITSAT-A microsatellite, which accompanied S80/T into orbit on the same launch. The S80/T mission was completed, from concept to launch, within one year and SSTL delivered the platform, associated groundstation equipment and would be providing operations support during the mission within a contract of less than 1M.
  • Oscar 23 - . Payload: Kitsat-A. Mass: 50 kg (110 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KAIST. Manufacturer: Surrey. Program: Oscar. Class: Communications. Type: Amateur radio communications satellite. Spacecraft: MicroSat-70. USAF Sat Cat: 22077 . COSPAR: 1992-052B. Apogee: 1,322 km (821 mi). Perigee: 1,310 km (810 mi). Inclination: 66.1000 deg. Period: 111.90 min. Summary: Korean's first satellite achieved via a technology transfer programme with Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. Carried store and forward communications, DSP and Earth observation payloads. Still operational in 2000..

1992 August 10 - .
  • Landing of Soyuz TM-14 - . Return Crew: Kaleri; Tognini; Viktorenko. Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Kaleri; Tognini; Viktorenko. Program: Mir. Flight: Mir EO-11; Mir Antares; Mir EO-12. Summary: The Soyuz TM-14 crew, Aleksandr Viktorenko and Aleksandr Kaleri, returned to Earth together with French astronaut Michel Tognini. The Soyuz TM-14 undocked from Mir at 21:47 GMT on August 9, and landed in Kazakhstan at 01:07 GMT on August 10..

1993 August 10 - . 14:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC16/2. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78M. LV Configuration: Molniya 8K78M-2BL.
  • Cosmos 2261 - . Payload: Oko #74. Mass: 1,900 kg (4,100 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: MOM. Class: Military. Type: Early warning satellite. Spacecraft: Oko. USAF Sat Cat: 22741 . COSPAR: 1993-051A. Apogee: 35,967 km (22,348 mi). Perigee: 4,370 km (2,710 mi). Inclination: 66.6000 deg. Period: 717.40 min. Summary: Covered Oko constellation plane 9 - 235 degree longitude of ascending node..

1993 August 10 - . 22:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511U. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A511U N15000-634.
  • Progress M-19 - . Payload: Progress M s/n 219. Mass: 7,250 kg (15,980 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: MOM. Program: Mir. Class: Manned. Type: Manned logistics spacecraft. Flight: Mir EO-14. Spacecraft: Progress M. Duration: 69.08 days. Completed Operations Date: 1993-10-20 00:17:41 . Decay Date: 1993-10-20 00:17:41 . USAF Sat Cat: 22745 . COSPAR: 1993-052A. Apogee: 223 km (138 mi). Perigee: 179 km (111 mi). Inclination: 51.8000 deg. Period: 88.50 min. Summary: Unmanned resupply vessel to Mir. Docked with Mir at the Kvant rear port on 13 Aug 1993 00:00:06 GMT. Undocked on 13 Oct 1993 17:59:06 GMT. Destroyed in reentry on 19 Oct 1993 00:22:14 GMT. Total free-flight time 7.33 days. Total docked time 61.75 days..

1994 August 10 - . 23:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44LP. LV Configuration: Ariane 44LP+ V66.
  • Brasilsat B1 - . Mass: 1,765 kg (3,891 lb). Nation: Brazil. Agency: Tele Mex. Program: Brasilsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: HS 376W. USAF Sat Cat: 23199 . COSPAR: 1994-049A. Apogee: 35,791 km (22,239 mi). Perigee: 35,782 km (22,233 mi). Inclination: 0.0300 deg. Period: 1,436.12 min. 28 C-band transponders, 1 X-band transponder (military). Stationed at 70.05 deg W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 70 deg W in 1994-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 70.00 deg W drifting at 0.003 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 71.44W drifting at 0.304W degrees per day.
  • Turksat 1B - . Mass: 1,779 kg (3,922 lb). Nation: Turkey. Agency: Turk Tel. Manufacturer: Cannes. Program: Turksat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Spacebus 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 23200 . COSPAR: 1994-049B. Apogee: 35,798 km (22,243 mi). Perigee: 35,774 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. 16 Ku-band transponders. Stationed at 41.92 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 42 deg E in 1994-1996; 31 deg E in 1996-1999 As of 4 September 2001 located at 31.29 deg E drifting at 0.000 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 6 located at 144.60E drifting at 4.406W degrees per day.

1997 August 10 - . 13:36 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. LV Family: Viper. Launch Vehicle: Viper 3A. LV Configuration: Viper 3A Falling Sphere.
  • CRISTA Aeronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 123 km (76 mi).

1997 August 10 - . 21:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Wallops Island. LV Family: Loki. Launch Vehicle: Super Loki. LV Configuration: Super Loki Falling Sphere.
  • CRISTA Aeronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Apogee: 111 km (68 mi).

1999 August 10 - .
  • Mir News 465: Computer failure on board Mir-space station - . Nation: Russia. Program: Mir. Flight: Mir EO-27; Mir EO-26/-27. During a radio-amateur conversation on 30.07.99 at 1450 UTC (orb. 76824) Haignere said that they had a minor problem with the attitude control of the station, but that all was well and he expected that the problem would soon be solved. During the pass in orb. 76825 (1627 UTC) TsUP gave Afanasyev computer commands related to the correction of the attitude with the use of steering rockets and the VDU-thruster, and in that way restoring the efficiency of the solar batteries. One orbit later (76826) at 1935 UTC TsUP told Avdeyev that he could use the means of the 'ship' (Soyuz-TM29) to secure the power supply.

    The cause of the computer failure was a wrong command from TsUP. The crew was not very impressed and apart from the operation to restore the functioning of the gyrodynes, they continued a number of experiments and Haignere remained busy with his radio-amateur passion. TsUP altered the working schedule for the next days, using the interruption in the functioning of the attitude control to put forward the integration of the new control and navigation system (BUPO) in the Propulsion Control System of the complex. To make this integration possible, much of propulsion system had to be switched off, and so this 'failure' was utilised in a positive way.

    BUPO: This is the Russian abbreviation for the new control unit. The name is Unit for Control, Docking and Orientation (Blok Upravleniya Prichalivaniya i Orientatsii). As far as I could derive from radio traffic, they concluded this work already on 31.07.99. On 2.08.1999 the crew conducted tests of the new system. That day the gyrodynes were spinning again at full speed.

    It always lasts some time to gather the necessary details to know how a new system works. Several news bulletins gave the impression that the BUPO replaced the old central computer TsVM-1. But this computer, and also the SUD (movements control system), which controls the functioning of the gyrodynes, are still operational. BUPO has to secure a safe flight when the station has no crew on board.

    According to the modest information at my disposal at this point, BUPO can replace the crew when the attitude control by gyrodynes fails. Thus far the crew used to take over that control by commanding steering rockets and the VDU roll control thruster, thus restoring the attitude and the correct angles of the solar batteries towards the sun. One of the first actions of the crew when the normal attitude control fails, has been the switching off of all energy consuming systems. BUPO should be able to do that when there is no crew on board.

    The 'P' is an indication that this system will enable TsUP to control approach and docking operations. It stands for 'mooring' or 'docking' (Prichalivaniye). This might mean that BUPO can replace the crew when during docking operations, the automatic Kurs system fails. In the beginning of the year 2000 such an operation has to be executed. Then the 'tanker' Progress-M43, containing 4 fuel tanks, has to be docked at Mir for the final operation: giving the impulse to put the Mir-complex on a destruction course into the atmosphere. So if the Russians can not find the funds to send an extra crew (eventual Mir's Main expedition nr. 28, by Soyuz-TM30), TsUP might via BUPO secure the docking of the tanker.

    Mir-routine: The cosmonauts energetically continue to execute experiments. If you did not know better, you might get the impression that Mir's exploitation would still last for a long time. Haignere does all what is necessary to conclude the Perseus program, he still executes experiments like Alice-2 and Genesis.

    A few days ago Avdeyev installed equipment for the execution of the experiment Volna for the study of the efficiency of capillary intake gadgets in fuel tanks. Afanasyev worked on an experiment named Linza. Apart from these technological experiments the normal series were mentioned, giving all kinds of spectrometers and other devices the opportunity to sing their swan song.

    But the fact that the crew will leave the space station before long more and more emerges in the radio traffic. The crew already is training in the Chibis suit, always a standard training for crews about to return to earth and they undergo extra medical checks, especially of the cardio-vascular system. Meanwhile they are replacing equipment, for instance a few days ago some accumulator batteries.

    During radio-amateur conversations Haignere told that they have to do a lot of work during the last weeks of their mission. One of the main tasks is to prevent that an eventual extra crew will arrive in a chaos.

    They will load all waste, especially human waste and garbage, in the Progress-M42 and they will have to prepare all on board systems for the flight of Mir in the unmanned status. He also spoke about the extra exercises they have to do to be ready to meet the earthly gravity conditions.

    Communications: During the last weeks the radio traffic is very dense. The crew regularly uses 2 different channels: 143.625 and 130.165 mc. Via one channel they speak with TsUP, via the other channel they exchange Packet Radio traffic or hold a second conversation. The transceiver for radio-amateur traffic is almost always red-hot, especially when Haignere is using it. He continues to express his displeasure about the lack of discipline among radio-amateurs who fail to listen before calling.

    If the dense working schedule of the cosmonauts makes this possible, there will be a lot of radio-amateur activities during the last 2 weekends, possibly also with SSTV images.

    Eventual extra expedition next year: Optimists are sure that such a mission will take place. If so this will be the 28th Main Expedition to Mir, the crew of which will fly to Mir on the Soyuz-TM30. The members of the present crew are not optimistic: Avdeyev and Haignere are not sure that such a mission is possible. At TsUP there is some hope, but the most used expression there is: 'ne veroyatno' (unlikely).

    For Russia another mission is more important. Nowadays 2 crews are training for a flight to the International Space Station in December 1999 to be there when the Service Module (Zvezda) will arrive there.

    That crew must be there for the eventual manual docking of Zvezda if the automatic mode fails. The first crew consists of Padalka and Budarin, the stand-in crew of Korzun and Treshchov.

    The return flight of the present and probably last crew with the Soyuz-TM29 is scheduled for 28.08.1999. Regretfully this decision is irreversible.

    Chris van den Berg, NL-9165/A-UK3202


2001 August 10 - . 21:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Shuttle. LV Configuration: Space Shuttle STS-105.
  • STS-105 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Horowitz; Sturckow; Barry; Forrester; Culbertson; Dezhurov; Tyurin. Payload: Discovery F30 / Leonardo. Mass: 116,914 kg (257,751 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Horowitz; Sturckow; Barry; Forrester; Culbertson; Dezhurov; Tyurin. Agency: NASA Houston. Manufacturer: Boeing. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-105; ISS EO-3. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 11.88 days. Decay Date: 2001-08-22 . USAF Sat Cat: 26888 . COSPAR: 2001-035A. Apogee: 402 km (249 mi). Perigee: 373 km (231 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.30 min. STS 105 was an American shuttle that carried a crew of ten (including three crew for the ISS - one American and two Russian), five tonnes of supplies, hardware, and a bedroom suite to accommodate a third astronaut in the Destiny module. The crew installed in the station two new science experiment racks that were carried in the Leonardo container which was first lifted out of the shuttle and bolted to the Unity module. Leonardo then carried back all the trash from the ISS back to the shuttle. They crew installed the MISSE (Materials International Space Station Experiment) container outside the ISS to test the effect of radiation on materials and some low-cost science experiments such as microgravity cell growth studies inside the station.

    The 15,107 kg payload consisted of:

    • Bay 1-2: Orbiter Docking System/External Airlock and 3 EMU spacesuits - 2160 kg
    • Bay 4P: Adapter beam with G-780 (Mayo High School, Rochester, Minnesota experiment to study germination of faba beans) and PSP-1 (NASA-GSFC canister with passive experiments and ballast) - 200 kg
    • Bay 5: Integrated Cargo Carrier/KYD - 1280 kg, with the Early Ammonia Servicer for the station's P6 truss- 640 kg and two small exposure experiments PEC-1 and PEC-2, to be installed on the be installed on the ISS Quest module as part of the MISSE materials exposure program
    • Bay 7-12: MPLM FM1 (Leonardo) module - 9800 kg total including 3300 kg of payload to be transferred to the Station
    • Bay 13P: Adapter beam with G-774 (Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment) and SEM-10 (canister with 11 school experiments) - 410 kg
    • Bay 13S: Adapter beam with Simplesat and ACE avionics - 355 kg
    • Sill: RMS arm - 410 kg
    STS-105 main engine cutoff was at 2118 GMT placed Discovery and external tank ET-110 into a 58 x 234 km x 51.6 deg orbit. At 2148 GMT Discovery reached apogee and fired its OMS engines to enter a 155 x 233 km x 51.6 deg orbit; another burn at 0100 GMT raised the orbit to 198 x 277 km. Discovery docked at the Station's PMA-2 port at 1842 GMT on August 12. After some problems aligning the docking system, the docking ring was retracted and latched at 1905 GMT and the hatch was opened to ISS at 2042 GMT. Expedition 3 began on August 13 at 1915 GMT when the new crew's seat liners were installed on the Soyuz transport ship. The formal EX-2/EX-3 change-of-command ceremony was held on August 17 in Destiny.

    The Leonardo MPLM module was lifted out of Discovery's payload bay at 1326 GMT on August 13 and docked to Unity's nadir at 1554 GMT. 3300 kg of cargo from Leonardo was transferred to the Station. Then 1700 kg of station garbage and materials were loaded into Leonardo. It was unberthed from Unity at 1816 GMT on August 19 and returned to the payload bay for the return to Earth at 1917 GMT.

    Discovery undocked at 1452 GMT on August 20 with the Expedition 2 crew aboard, leaving Expedition 3 at the Station.

    At 1830 GMT on August 20 the Simplesat test satellite was ejected from a GAS canister in the cargo bay. Discovery landed at Kennedy Space Center at 1822:58 GMT on August 22 on runway 15, after a deorbit burn at 1715 GMT. The Expedition Two crew of Usachyov, Voss and Helms had been in space for 167 days. Discovery was taken out of service after the flight for structural inspections. Its last maintenance down period was in 1995-1996.


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