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Your Flight Has Been Cancelled....
Is what might have been better than what was? Would America have beaten the Russians into space or even into orbit? Could the Russians have beaten the United States in the Moon Race? Would China have put a man in space 30 years earlier? Would the Skylab space station have been saved, and America be operating a shuttle-serviced space station 20 years before the ISS? Decisions that changed the course of history…



Subtopics

Fast Solutions Phase I In 1956 Korolev drafted a plan for 'Fast Solutions for the Conquest of Space'. Phase I of the plan involved ballistic manned sub-orbital flights aboard an R-5A single-stage IRBM. Although R-5A tests with dogs began in 1958, manned flights on the R-5A were not taken to the flight stage (despite rumors in 1959 of cosmonaut deaths in suborbital flights). Korolev decided to move directly to manned orbital flights using the Vostok spacecraft and R-7 booster.

Adam Flight 1 In February 1958, building on the success of his Redstone putting America's first satellite into space, Wernher von Braun proposed Project Adam. This modest $12 million project promised to have an American in space by the end of 1959, a year sooner than the Air Force's $100 million MISS (Man-In-Space-Soonest). Originally dubbed "Man Very High", the idea was to use an Army Ballistic Missile Agency Redstone rocket to boost a USAF Man High balloon gondola with a human 'test subject' on a suborbital trajectory. The concept was opposed by both the USAF and NACA. It was finally killed in July 1958, but then roled into Project Mercury by NASA - with the first manned flight of Mercury-Redstone not coming until April 1961 - after the Soviets had orbited the first man in space.

MISS Flight 1 In the USAF Man-In-Space Soonest program plan issued on 15 June 1958 targeted the first manned flight for April 1960. Ten days later the first astronaut group was identified - consisting of Robert Walker, Scott Crossfield, Neil Armstrong, and Robert Rushworth. But a month later the project was stopped, and NASA was handed the program in September 1959. NASA's project Mercury wouldn't orbit an American until 1962.

Little Joe 5A In April 1959, plans were made for three or four Mercury-Little Joe flights with animal passengers. NASA secretly considered a manned mission but quickly dropped the idea when the dynamic pressures involved were reviewed.

Mercury Balloon Flight Tests In January 1959, balloon flights were planned for qualification of the Mercury spacecraft. These would occur from July 1959 to January 1961. Final flights would be manned tests of up to 24 hours duration, with recovery of the capsule at sea. Cancelled May 1959.

Mercury MR-3A Planned manned Mercury flight that would have put an American in space before the Russians. But after booster problems on Mercury MR-2, von Braun insisted on a further unmanned booster test. This proved to be unnecessary. If NASA had overruled Von Braun, Shepard would have been the first man in space, beating Gagarin's flight by three weeks.

Mercury MR-5 Planned Mercury suborbital flight. After Soviet full-day orbital flight in August 1961, NASA's suborbital hops looked pathetic. Further suborbital Mercury flights were cancelled.

Mercury MR-6 Planned Mercury suborbital flight. Cancelled July 1961; delays in Redstone flights meant Atlas orbital flights were imminent.

Mercury-Jupiter 2 (MJ-2) Planned manned Mercury long-range suborbital flights using the Jupiter IRBM as a booster. These were considered as an intermediary step in the Mercury program before use of the Jupiter booster in the program was cancelled in July 1959 on cost grounds.

Mercury MA-7 Delta 7 Planned second US manned orbital flight. Cancelled 18 March 1962 when astronaut's minor heart condition became public.

Mercury MA-9A Planned Mercury six-orbit mission. Canceled and NASA moved directly to an 18-orbit mission due to astronaut shortage and change in concept (flights no longer used just to train astronauts).

Vostok 6A Cancelled female cosmonaut flight. Originally Vostok 5/6 were to be dual female flights. Two capsules would be launched a day apart; each would remain aloft for three days. Changed by leadership to single female flight in March 1963.

Mercury MA-10 Planned second one-day Mercury flight. Cancelled as too risky after Mercury MA-9 achieved objective only after failure of many spacecraft systems.

Mercury MA-11 Planned third one-day Mercury flight. Cancelled as too risky after Mercury MA-9 achieved objective, but only after failure of many spacecraft systems.

Mercury MA-12 Planned fourth one-day Mercury flight. Cancelled mid-1962 in order to move on to Gemini.

Vostok 7 Eight day manned flight planned for the last quarter of 1963, then June 1964. All further Vostok flights cancelled in favor of multi-crew Voskhod in February 1964.

Vostok 8 Planned ten day manned flight; second high altitude flight into the lower Van Allen radiation belt for radiological-biological studies. All further Vostok flights cancelled in favor of multi-crew Voskhod in February 1964.

Vostok 9 Proposed high altitude Vostok flight for extended scientific studies to be flown in 1963-1964; All further Vostok flights cancelled in favor of multi-crew Voskhod in February 1964.

Vostok 10 Planned ten-day flight, science plus engineering tests of ion flow sensors to be used for orientation of later Soyuz spacecraft. All follow-on Vostok missions cancelled in spring 1964.

Soyuz A-1 Planned Soyuz circumlunar mission. Soyuz would dock with a refueled rocket stage and be accelerated on a loop around the moon. Cancelled in mid-1964 due to delays in Soyuz and decision to race Americans to moon landing.

Vostok 11 Proposed Vostok flight to conduct extra-vehicular activity tests. All follow-on Vostok missions cancelled in spring 1964 and EVA moved to Voskhod 2.

Soyuz A-2 The planned second manned Soyuz circumlunar mission in 1965 would have been commanded by Bykovsky. The cosmonauts trained docking with the 9K and 11K rocket stages for months before the mission concept was dumped in August 1964.

Vostok 12 Proposed Vostok flight to conduct extra-vehicular activity tests. The Vostok would be modified by having the ejection seat removed and an airlock built into the spacecraft. All follow-on Vostok missions cancelled in Spring 1964.

Soyuz A-3 Planned manned circumlunar flight with a female cosmonaut. Popovich was to have been accompanied by female cosmonaut Ponomaryova in what would have been the first mixed crew flight to the moon in 1965. The program was cancelled in August 1964.

Soyuz A-4 Planned fourth Soyuz circumlunar mission. Cancelled August 1964.

Apollo SA-11 From September 1962 NASA planned to fly four early manned Apollo spacecraft on Saturn I boosters. Cancelled in October 1963 in order to fly all-up manned Apollo CSM on more powerful Saturn IB.

Apollo SA-12 From September 1962 NASA planned to fly four early manned Apollo spacecraft on Saturn I boosters. Cancelled in October 1963 in order to fly all-up manned Apollo CSM on more powerful Saturn IB.

Vostok 13 Proposed high altitude manned Vostok flight for extended scientific studies. All follow-on Vostok missions cancelled in spring 1964.

Apollo SA-13 From September 1962 NASA planned to fly four early manned Apollo spacecraft on Saturn I boosters. Cancelled in October 1963 in order to fly all-up manned Apollo CSM on more powerful Saturn IB.

Gemini 9A Planned mission, cancelled when prime crew killed in T-38 trainer crash. All subsequent crew assignments were reshuffled. This ended up determining who would be the first man on the moon.…

Voskhod 3 Manned space flight deferred just 15 days before launch in May 1966. It would have been a world-record 18-day space endurance mission, tasked primarily with testing ballistic missile detection equipment. Never formally cancelled, it just faded away in Brezhnev-era stagnation…

Dynasoar 3 Planned Dynasoar first manned single-orbit flight. The flight would have been devoted to demonstrating pilot control of the spacecraft and evaluation of the systems (this was to have followed two unmanned flight tests). Project cancelled December 1963.

Apollo SA-14 From September 1962 NASA planned to fly four early manned Apollo spacecraft on Saturn I boosters. Cancelled in October 1963 in order to fly all-up manned Apollo CSM on more powerful Saturn IB.

Voskhod 4 Planned second long-duration 20 day Voskhod flight. Cancelled in spring 1966 after near-disaster with Voskhod 2 and death of Korolev.

Dynasoar 4 Planned second manned Dynasoar single-orbit flight. Objectives were to demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and systems evaluation. Project cancelled in December 1963

Voskhod 5 Planned all-female ten day long-duration flight. Solovyova would have conducted the first female space walk. Cancelled in spring 1966, after death of Korolev, in order to concentrate on Soyuz and Lunar landing programs.

Voskhod 6 Planned Voskhod flight that would include EVA with test of the UPMK 'jet belt'. Cancelled in spring 1966.

Apollo 204 The planned first manned flight of the Apollo CSM, the Apollo C category mission. The crew was killed in a fire while testing their capsule on the pad on 27 January 1967, still weeks away from launch. Set back Apollo program by 18 months.

Dynasoar 5 Planned third manned Dynasoar single-orbit flight; would demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and systems evaluation. Project cancelled in December 1963.

Apollo 205 Planned second solo flight test of the Block I Apollo CSM on a Saturn IB. Cancelled after the Apollo 204 fire.

Soyuz 2A Soyuz 2 was planned to launch the day after Soyuz 1, to dock with it and transfer crew. Instead Soyuz 1 solar panel didn't deploy; manual reentry; tangled parachute lines; death of cosmonaut. Soyuz 2 cancelled.

Dynasoar 6 Planned fourth manned Dynasoar single-orbit flight; would demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and systems evaluation. Project cancelled in December 1963.

Soyuz s/n 3/4 Prior to the Soyuz 1 disaster, planned second dual Soyuz manned docking mission. Crew Komarov, Bykovsky, Khrunov, and Yeliseyev.

Dynasoar 7 Planned fifth manned Dynasoar single-orbit flight. Would demonstrate reuse of a minimally-refurbished spacecraft flown on an earlier mission. Project cancelled in December 1963

Apollo 207 Planned Apollo D mission. Two Saturn IB launches would put Apollo CSM and LM into orbit. CSM crew would dock with LM, test it in earth orbit. Cancelled after Apollo 204 fire.

Soyuz s/n 5/6 Prior to the Soyuz 1 disaster, planned third dual Soyuz manned docking mission.

Dynasoar 8 Planned sixth manned Dynasoar single-orbit flight. Would demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and a precision recovery. Project cancelled in December 1963

Soyuz s/n 7 Prior to Soyuz 1 disaster, planned solo Soyuz mission to test Vulkan space welding device. Commander was to be either Komarov, Bykovsky, Gagarin, Nikolayev, Beregovoi, or Shatalov. The other two crewmembers were to be either Lankin and Fartushny from the Paton Institute, VVS cosmonaut Kolodin, or an engineer from OKB-1.

Apollo 503 Cancelled Apollo E mission - test of the Apollo lunar module in high earth orbit. Lunar module was not ready. Instead mission flown only with CSM into lunar orbit as Apollo 8.

Dynasoar 9 Planned first multi-orbit flight and seventh manned flight of Dynasoar would have the objectives to demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and a precision recovery. Project cancelled in December 1963

Dynasoar 10 Planned eighth manned flight, second multi-orbit flight, and final flight of the Dynasoar program would have the objectives to demonstrate maneuver in orbit and during re-entry, and a precision recovery. Project cancelled in December 1963

Soyuz VI Flight 1 The planned first flight of the Soyuz VI combat spacecraft was planned for early 1969, beating America's equivalent Manned Orbiting Lab. The project was cancelled in 1968 in favor of Mishin's OIS (in turn cancelled in 1970) and Chelomei's Almaz stations.

Soyuz 7K-L1 mission 1 Planned first manned circumnavigation of the moon. It was decided after the American Apollo 8 lunar orbital flight in December 1968 to cancel any 'second place' Soviet manned circumlunar flights.

Soyuz sn 14 As of February 1969 Soyuz s/n 14 was set for a solo seven day mission in April-May 1969. The spacecraft and crew were reassigned to the three-spacecraft Soyuz 6/7/8 mission and flew as Soyuz 6.

Soyuz 7K-L1 mission 2 Planned second Soviet circumlunar flight. Cancelled after the success of the American Apollo 8.

Soyuz 7K-L1 mission 3 Planned third and final Russian circumlunar flight. Cancelled after the success of the American Apollo 8 in December 1968.

Soyuz s/n 15+16 As of February 1969 Soyuz s/n 15 and 16 were set for a mission with a total of 5 cosmonauts aboard in August-September 1969. They would have remained docked together for three days.

Soyuz n 17 Cancelled 16 day mission with Soyuz n 17 to conduct rendezvous and docking operations and demonstrate life support system for the LK manned lunar lander.

Soyuz n 18 Cancelled 16 day mission with Soyuz n 18 to conduct rendezvous and docking operations and demonstrate life support system for the LOK manned lunar orbiter.

Soyuz n 19 The active spacecraft in the second planned test of the Kontakt lunar rendezvous/docking system. These would have been 15 to 16 day missions to demonstrate both the new SZhO life support system for the L3, to conduct rendezvous and docking operations using the L3's Kontakt system, and to conduct EVA transfer of one cosmonaut.

Soyuz n 20 Passive spacecraft in the second planned test of the Kontakt lunar rendezvous/docking system. One or two of the crew would have spacewalked to the Soyuz 11 Kontakt and returned in the other spacecraft.

Soyuz 12 / DOS 1 If the Soyuz 11 crew had not perished during return to the earth, the Leonov crew would have been sent for a second visit to the Salyut 1 space station. A 30-day mission duration was planned.

DOS 2-1 Null

DOS 2-2 Null

DOS 2-3 Null

Soyuz sn 18 Soyuz s/n 18 would have been the active spacecraft of the first dual-spacecraft test of the Kontakt docking system. A crew transfer using the Krechet spacesuit would presumably have taken place.

Soyuz sn 19 Soyuz s/n 19 was to have been equipped with the passive Kontakt rendezvous/docking system of the LK lunar lander. It would have been the docking target for Soyuz s/n 18. A crew transfer using the Krechet spacesuit would presumably have taken place.

MOL 3 At the time of the cancellation of the MOL program in June 1969, the first manned mission was planned for early 1972. A crew of two would have spent thirty days in orbit operating sophisticated military reconnaissance equipment and other experiments.

Soyuz sn 20 Soyuz s/n 20 would have been the active spacecraft of the second dual launch to test the Kontakt lunar orbit rendezvous system. A crew transfer using the Krechet spacesuit would presumably have taken place.

Soyuz sn 21 Soyuz s/n 21 equipped with the passive Kontakt rendezvous/docking system of the LK lunar lander. Would have served as a docking target for Soyuz s/n 20 . A crew transfer using the Krechet spacesuit would presumably have taken place.

DOS 2-4 Null

Soyuz sn 22 Soyuz s/n 22 would have been the active spacecraft of the second dual launch to test the Kontakt lunar orbit rendezvous system. A crew transfer using the Krechet spacesuit would presumably have taken place.

Soyuz sn 23 Soyuz s/n 23 would have been equipped with the passive Kontakt rendezvous/docking system of the LK lunar lander. The spacecraft would have served as a docking target for Soyuz s/n 22.

Soviet Lunar Landing The Russians were never able to have enough success with the N1 booster to have a serious schedule for the first Soviet lunar landing. In January 1969, before the first N1 launch, it was not expected that a Soviet landing would take place until 1972 at the earliest.

Soyuz (Almaz) 12 Planned first crew to the first Almaz space station. Cancelled after the loss of control of Almaz OPS 1 (Salyut 2) in orbit.

Soyuz (Almaz) 13 Planned second crew to the first Almaz space station. Cancelled after the loss of control of Almaz OPS 1 (Salyut 2) in orbit.

Soyuz 12 / DOS 2 Planned first mission to the Salyut DOS 2 space station. Cancelled after DOS 2 was destroyed during launch.

Soyuz 13 / DOS 2 Planned second mission to the Salyut DOS 2 space station. Cancelled after DOS 2 was destroyed during launch.

MOL 4 Planned date of second manned MOL mission at time of the program cancellation.

Soyuz Kontakt A Final crews selected for a dual Soyuz mission in Earth orbit to test the Kontakt docking system to be used on the lunar landing LOK and LK spacecraft. The Kontakt-A Soyuz would have been the active spacecraft, simulating the LOK lunar orbiter.

Soyuz Kontakt P Final crews selected for a dual Soyuz mission in Earth orbit to test the Kontakt docking system to be used on the lunar landing LOK and LK spacecraft. The Kontakt-P Soyuz would have been the passive spacecraft, simulating the LK lunar lander.

Soyuz 12 / DOS 3 Planned first mission to the Salyut DOS 3 space station (Cosmos 557). Cancelled after Cosmos 557 failed in orbit.

Apollo 18 Apollo 18 was originally planned in July 1969 to land in the moon's Schroter's Valley, a river-like channel-way. The original February 1972 landing date was extended when NASA cancelled the Apollo 20 mission in January 1970. Apollo 18 in turn cancelled on 2 September 1970 because of congressional cuts in FY 1971 NASA appropriations.

MOL 5 Planned date of third manned MOL mission at time of the program cancellation.

Soyuz 13 / DOS 3 Planned second mission to the Salyut DOS 3 space station (Cosmos 557). Cancelled after Cosmos 557 failed in orbit.

Skylab Rescue Influenced by the stranded Skylab crew portrayed in the book and movie 'Marooned', NASA provided a crew rescue capability for the only time in its history. Prepared for launch during Skylab 3. Scrubbed, Skylab 3 made landing with faulty thrusters instead.

Shuguang Flight 1 Development of China's first manned spacecraft, the two-crew Shuguang-1, began in 1966. By November 1971 19 astronauts were in training and first flight was expected in in 1966; 19 astronauts were selected in 1971; and first manned flight was expected by the end of 1973. However the project was starved of resources in the chaos of the Cultural Revolution and the managers of the astronaut training group were purged in the aftermath of the attempted overthrow of Mao Zedong by Lin Biao. The project was killed by Mao in 1972, citing priorities on earth. China would not orbit a man in space until thirty years later.

Apollo 19 Apollo 19 was originally planned to land in the Hyginus Rille region, which would allow study of lunar linear rilles and craters. Apollo 19 in turn cancelled on 2 September 1970 because of congressional cuts in FY 1971 NASA appropriations.

Skylab 5 After completion of the three programmed Skylab flights, NASA considered using the remaining backup Saturn IB and Apollo CSM to fly a fourth manned mission to Skylab. It would have been a short 20 day mission - the CSM systems would not have powered down.

MOL 6 Planned date of fourth manned MOL mission at time of the program cancellation. From the beginning of the project, the Navy had demanded that this be an all-Navy crew, which would limit the crew to Truly, with either Overmyer or Crippen as co-pilot.

Apollo 20 Apollo 20 was originally planned in July 1969 to land in Crater Copernicus, a spectacular large crater impact area. Later Copernicus was assigned to Apollo 19, and the preferred landing site for Apollo 20 was the Marius Hills, or, if the operational constraints were relaxed, the bright crater Tycho. The planned December 1972 flight was cancelled on January 4, 1970, before any crew assignments were made.

Soyuz 16A Planned but cancelled third mission to the Salyut 3 space station.

Skylab B After the completion of Apollo, Skylab, and ASTP programs there was still significant Apollo surplus hardware. Plans to use it were cancelled; an opportunity to launch an International Space Station, at a tenth the cost and twenty years earlier, was lost.

MOL 7 Planned date of fifth manned MOL mission. This mission was already deleted from the FY 1970 budget request in April 1969, two months before the entire project was cancelled.

Soyuz 25A Mission to the Salyut 5 space station, cancelled when fuel reserves aboard the station were 70 kg below those required for the planned 14 day mission.

Soyuz 26A Planned mission to Salyut 6 that would make first docking with rear docking port and be the first crew to swap spacecraft and return in the spacecraft that ferried the Soyuz 25 crew. But Soyuz 25 failed to dock with Salyut 6.

Cosmos 997 Planned manned single-orbit flight aboard the TKS space capsule during a series of two-TKS-launched-by-one-Proton flight tests. Flown unmanned due to inability to demonstrate two consecutive failure-free launches.

TKS VA s/n 008 Planned manned single-orbit flight aboard the TKS space capsule during a series of two-TKS-launched-by-one-Proton flight tests. Flown unmanned due to inability to demonstrate two consecutive failure-free launches.

Cosmos 1100 Planned manned single-orbit flight aboard the TKS space capsule during a series of two-TKS-launched-by-one-Proton flight tests. Flown unmanned due to inability to demonstrate two consecutive failure-free launches.

STS-2A Planned shuttle mission to reboost Skylab space station to higher orbit for use by shuttle. Before the first shuttle flew, Skylab burned up in the atmosphere and crashed into the Australian outback on July 11, 1979.

Soyuz T-3A Planned but cancelled manned flight. Crew dissolved when Lazarev failed physical in early 1981.

TKS-1 Planned first test manned flight of the TKS large ferry craft. Would have docked with the Almaz OPS 4 military space station. Flight cancelled with the rest of the Almaz program in 1981. Flown later unmanned to Salyut 6 as Cosmos 1267.

TKS-2 Second TKS flight that would have docked with the cancelled Almaz OPS 4 military space station. The spacecraft was instead flown unmanned to Salyut 7 as Cosmos 1443.

TKS-3 Third TKS flight that would have docked with the cancelled Almaz OPS 4 military space station. The spacecraft was instead flown unmanned to Salyut 7 as Cosmos 1686.

Salyut 7/TKS-2 Planned TKS manned mission to Salyut 7 station. Cancelled December 1981; TKS-2 flew unmanned to Salyut 7 as Cosmos 1443.

Soyuz Almaz 4 Planned Soyuz flight to dock with the Almaz OPS 4 space station. The mission was cancelled together with the Almaz program in 1981.

Salyut 7/TKS-3 Planned second manned flight of TKS ferry to the Salyut 7 space station. The crews were assigned in September/October 1979. But in December 1981 Ustinov finally killed Chelomei's plans for manned TKS flights. The TKS training group was dissolved and TKS-3 flew unmanned to Salyut 7 as Cosmos 1686.

STS-10 Planned Department of Defense shuttle mission. Cancelled due to payload delays.

STS-12 Planned TDRS/IUS deployment shuttle mission. Cancelled after IUS failures.

STS-41-E Planned Department of Defense shuttle mission. Cancelled due to IUS failure.

STS-41-F Canceled after the STS-10 launch abort required reshuffling of the shuttle schedule. Planned shuttle mission for deployment of commercial communications satellites. The STS-41F payload was added to STS-41D.Officially "cancelled due to payload delays".

STS-41-H Planned Department of Defense or TDRS deployment shuttle mission. Cancelled due to IUS failure.

STS-51-E Planned TDRS/IUS deployment shuttle mission. Cancelled due to IUS failure.

Soyuz T-13A Planned mission to operate military experiments aboard Salyut 7. Cancelled due to technical and personnel problems aboard station.

STS-51-AA Planned shuttle mission. Cancelled due to payload delays.

STS-51-DA Planned TDRS/IUS deployment shuttle mission. Cancelled due to IUS failure.

STS-51-H Planned EOM-1/2 shuttle mission. Cancelled due to payload delays.

Soyuz T-15A Final 'civilian' expedition to Salyut 7 station with Buran pilot aboard for spaceflight familiarization was cancelled when control of the station was lost.

STS-61-E Planned Astro-1 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-61-F Planned shuttle mission for deployment of Ulysses spacecraft. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-61-G Planned shuttle mission for deployment of Galileo spacecraft. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

Soyuz T-15B Cancelled second crew to operate TKS-3 military experiments aboard Salyut 7. These had been left uncompleted with the early return of the EO-4-2 crew due to Vasyutin's illness.

STS-61-H Planned shuttle mission for deployment of commercial communications satellites. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-62-A Planned Department of Defense shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster. Would have been first launch from the ill-fated SLC-6 launch site at Vandenberg, California.

STS-61-M Planned TDRS/IUS deployment shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-61-J Planned shuttle mission for deployment of Hubble space telescope. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-61-N Planned Department of Defense shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

Soyuz T-15C To have docked with Mir. Cancelled all-female flight to be launched on International Woman's Day. Breakdown of Salyut 7, exhaustion of stock of Soyuz T spacecraft, and official resistance led to cancellation of the mission.

STS-61-I Planned shuttle LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) recovery mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-62-B Planned Department of Defense shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-61-K Planned EOM-1 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster. No crew named, later combined with STS-61K

STS-61-L Planned shuttle mission for deployment of commercial communications satellites. Would have launched the first American journalist in space from Launch Complex 39B. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-B Planned shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-C Planned shuttle mission for deployment of commercial communications satellites. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-A Planned Astro-2 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-D Planned shuttle mission for deployment of commercial communications satellites. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-E Planned SLS-1 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-71-F Planned shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

Soyuz-Almaz-T-1 Planned launch to tend Almaz-T-1 station. Cancelled after the station's booster exploded on the way to orbit on 29 November 1986.

STS-71-M Planned Astro-3 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-81-G Planned Spacelab-J shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-81-M Planned SLS-2 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster.

STS-51-K Planned Spacelab-D1 shuttle mission. Cancelled after Challenger disaster. No crew selected; renamed STS-61A

Soyuz TM-8A Planned flight to ensure continuous occupation cancelled due to budget cutbacks and delay in launching Kvant 2 and Kristall modules.

Soyuz TM-13A Soyuz TM-13 and TM-14 crews were reshuffled extensively due to commercial considerations and necessity of flying a Kazakh cosmonaut. This was the original crew assignment. Kaleri and Avdeyev were replaced by Kazakh researchers in the final crew.

Soyuz TM-14A Soyuz TM-13 and TM-14 crews were reshuffled extensively due to commercial seat bookings by Austria and Germany and the necessity of flying a Kazakh-born cosmonaut as part of the Baikonur rental agreement. This was the original crew assignment. The Kazakh researchers were moved to the earlier Soyuz TM-13 flight.

Soyuz Buran Support Planned Soyuz flight to Mir. Main purpose was to provide spaceflight experience to Bachurin and Borodai, who had been selected as back-up crew of the first manned Buran flight (the original back-up crew of Levchenko and Shchukin both died in 1988). Cancelled in cut-backs after fall of the Soviet Union.

Soyuz TM-14B Soyuz TM-13 and TM-14 crews were reshuffled extensively due to commercial seat bookings by Austria and Germany and the necessity of flying a Kazakh-born cosmonaut as part of the Baikonur rental agreement. This was the second crew assignment. The Kazakh researchers were moved to the earlier Soyuz TM-13 flight and paying German researchers took their place in the final crew.

Buran 5 Cancelled Buran Flight 5 (3K1) would have been the first flight of the third orbiter. It would be the first manned Buran flight; the third orbiter was the first outfitted with life support systems and ejection seats.

Soyuz TMA-2A Soyuz TMA-2 was originally to switch lifeboats on the ISS. After the loss of Columbia, and grounding of the remaining shuttles, it was instead flown by a two-man skeleton crew to keep the station alive until shuttle flights could resume.

Soyuz TMA-3A Soyuz TMA-3 was originally to switch lifeboats on the ISS. After the Columbia disaster, the remaining shuttles were grounded. Soyuz TMA-3 instead flew with a skeleton crew to provide minimal manning of space station while shuttle was grounded.

STS-119A Flight delayed after the Columbia disaster. STS-119 was to have flown ISS Assembly mission ISS-15A. It would have delivered the fourth and final set of U.S. solar arrays along with the S6 fourth starboard truss segment.

STS-120A Flight delayed, then completely reorganized with a different crew and different orbiter after the Columbia disaster. STS-120 would have delivered to the station the second of three station connecting modules, Node 2, on ISS Assembly mission ISS-10A.

Soyuz TMA-4A Soyuz TMA-4 was originally to switch lifeboats on the ISS. After the Columbia disaster, the remaining shuttles were grounded. Soyuz TMA-4 instead flew with a skeleton crew to provide minimal manning of space station while shuttle was grounded.

STS-121A Cancelled after Columbia disaster; would have flown ISS Assembly mission ISS-9A.1, delivering the SPP with 4 Solar Arrays to the station.

STS-123A Cancelled after Columbia disaster; would have flown ISS resupply mission ISS-UF4. It would have delivered the contents of an Express Pallet, plus the SPDM and AMS to the station

STS-126A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS resupply mission ISS-UF3; carried an MPLM module and Express Pallet for delivery of equipment and supplies

STS-128A Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Flight 5. Flight delayed, then cancelled after the Columbia disaster. No crew had been named at the time of the loss of Columbia. Resurrected later after Congressional pressure.

STS-130A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS resupply mission ISS-UF5. Equipment and supplies would have been delivered to the station aboard an MPLM and Express Pallet.

STS-131A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-14A. 4 SPP Arrays and the MMOD would have been delivered to the station.

STS-132A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS resupply mission ISS-UF6. Supplies and equipment would have been delivered via an MPLM and EXPRESS Pallet in the cargo bay.

STS-133A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-20A. Node 3 would have been delivered to the station.

STS-134A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-16A. The Habitation module would have been delivered to the station.

STS-138A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS resupply mission ISS-UF7. The Centrifuge Accommodations Module (CAM) would have been delivered to the station.

STS-135A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-17A. An MPLM would have delivered Destiny lab racks and a CBA to the station.

STS-136A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-18A. The first US Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) would have been delivered to the station.

STS-137A Flight cancelled after the Columbia disaster. Would have flown ISS assembly mission ISS-19A. An MPLM and other station hardware would be delivered.



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